Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from May 23, 2016

It was the Lord’s Will...

It was the Lord’s Will...

Isaiah 53:10
Excerpt


The suffering and death of the Servant was clearly the Lord’s will. In that sense He was “slain from the Creation of the world” (Rev. 13:8). The statement, the Lord made the Servant’s life a guilt offering, does not mean that Jesus’ life satisfied the wrath of God but that His life which culminated in His death was the sacrifice for sins. As indicated in Isaiah 53:7-8 He had to die to satisfy the righteous demands of God. The word for “guilt offering” is’āšām, used in Leviticus5:15; 6:5; 19:21 and elsewhere of an offering to atone for sin.

His death and burial appeared to end His existence (He was “cut off, ” Isa.53:8), but in actuality because of His resurrection Jesus will see His offspring(those who by believing in Him become children of God, John 1:12) and He will prolong His days (live on forever as the Son of God). He will be blessed (prosper; cf. Isa. 53:12a) because of His obedience to the will (plan) of theLord.


Martin, John A. “Isai…

The Setting for the Sign

The Setting for the Sign

Excerpt


Like the name of Lazarus, the sisters, Mary and Martha, also are mentioned in the Gospel of Luke (10:38–42). In both contexts Martha is represented primarily as a rather determined worker (Luke 10:41: cf. John 12:2) and Mary as the worshipful one (Luke 10:39, 42; cf. John 11:2; 12:3). In this present context an interesting technique of storytelling is employed. Mary the sister of Lazarus is identified here before the event as the one who anointed the Lord and wiped his feet with her hair (11:2; cf.12:3).That loving, sacrificial event must have seared itself into the minds of the early Christians, as both Mark 14:9) and Matthew26:13 bear witness. For John, who constantly had in mind the death of the Lamb, this reference serves as a window into Jesus’ acceptance of his death (cf. John 12:7). But perhaps there is more to this remark. John generally avoided the post resurrection confessional use of kyrios, “Lord,” up to this point (cf. however, my remarks at…

Walking With Jesus

Walking With Jesus

Excerpt


In the Bible, “walking” is a frequent figure of behavior or lifestyle. Since Jesus lives in the believer, a person who is living close to Him will have a Christlike lifestyle. Christ loved and gave Himself for us. Anyone who hates his brother is still in darkness. Love for others is one way that Jesus expresses Himself in our lives.


Richards, Lawrence O. The Bible Reader’s Companion. electronic ed. Wheaton: Victor Books, 1991. Print.

Introduction

Introduction

Excerpt


‎Jehovah has been pleased to give us the revelation of His mind and will in words. It is therefore absolutely necessary that we should understand not merely the meanings of the words themselves, but also the laws which govern their usage and combinations.

‎All language is governed by law; but, in order to increase the power of a word, or the force of an expression, these laws are designedly departed from, and words and sentences are thrown into, and used in, new forms, or figures.

‎The ancient Greeks reduced these new and peculiar forms to science, and gave names to more than two hundred of them. …


Bullinger, Ethelbert William. Figures of Speech Used in the Bible. London; New York: Eyre & Spottiswoode; E. & J. B. Young & Co., 1898. Print.

Minister to One Another in the Church

Minister to One Another in the Church

Romans 12:3

Excerpt


When our thinking has truly been transformed and renewed by the Spirit, it is impossible to have an exaggerated view of our own worth. Instead, we will humbly use all our gifts and strengths to minister to each other. This is Paul’s concern here as he calls for sober judgment regarding our place in God’s community. So he begins with the grace given to me, probably a reference to his Damascus Road experience (Acts 9) where he encountered God’s gracious call to be his apostle to the Gentiles; thus he is appealing to his apostolic authority.


Osborne, Grant R. Romans. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2004. Print. The IVP New Testament Commentary Series.

The Synagogue at Capernaum

The Synagogue at Capernaum


‎Luke’s Gospel says the synagogue in Capernaum was built by the centurion of whom Jesus later said, “I have not found such faith in Israel” (Luke 7:5, 9). It was destroyed and rebuilt in the fourth century.

The Sphinx

The Sphinx
‎ What is the Sphinx? It is the body of a lion couchant, with the head of a man—“a symbol of animal power and of human intellect.” The whole figure was typical of kingly royalty and set forth the power and wisdom of the Egyptian monarch. One traveler describes the present appearance of the great Sphinx as, “a ball of stone rising on a neck some forty feet above the sand.” Miss Edwards says, “the sphinx is purely an Egyptian monster and of immemorial antiquity. The great sphinx of Gizeh is probably the oldest monument in Egypt. There are thousands of sphinxes in Egypt of various sizes, but the great Sphinx is this one at the base of the pyramids. It is carved out of the summit of the original rock from which it has never been separated. Its body is over one hundred feet long; its head is thirty feet long and fourteen in width; the marks of paint still remain on the face—on the eye-brows and on the right cheek. The face is much mutilated; the body is hidden by drifting sands…

Connect the Testaments

May 23: Fear: The Fight against It
1 Chronicles 12:1–13:14; 1 Timothy 6:11–21; Psalm 81:1–82:8

Fear is poisonous. When it drives our decisions, it will slowly destroy us—causing us to make moves that are against God’s will and detrimental to ourselves and others. The antidote to fear is complete reliance on Yahweh, our God, and His work through the Spirit.
David is the epitome of someone who sets aside fear in favor of God’s work. He surrounds himself with “feared” men, his “mighty men.” The descriptions of their skills show the caliber of these warriors and thus the incredible character and skill it must have taken to lead them (1 Chr 12:1–15). It takes courage to be a leader and valor to be a leader of leaders. David was a man of valor—a man empowered by the Spirit’s work.
It would have been easy for David to worry or be concerned as a leader—especially when the Spirit comes upon a smaller group of men who oppose him. People rise up around him, and they are being chosen by God in a w…

Morning and Evening

Morning, May 23                                        Go To Evening Reading
         “The Lord will perfect that which concerneth me.”          —Psalm 138:8
Most manifestly the confidence which the Psalmist here expressed was a divine confidence. He did not say, “I have grace enough to perfect that which concerneth me—my faith is so steady that it will not stagger—my love is so warm that it will never grow cold—my resolution is so firm that nothing can move it; no, his dependence was on the Lord alone. If we indulge in any confidence which is not grounded on the Rock of ages, our confidence is worse than a dream, it will fall upon us, and cover us with its ruins, to our sorrow and confusion. All that Nature spins time will unravel, to the eternal confusion of all who are clothed therein. The Psalmist was wise, he rested upon nothing short of the Lord’s work. It is the Lord who has begun the good work within us; it is he who has carried it on; and if he does not finish it, it never wi…

My Utmost for His Highest

May 23rd
Careful infidelity


Take no thought for your life, what ye shall eat, or what ye shall drink; nor yet for your body what ye shall put on. Matthew 6:25.

Jesus sums up commonsense carefulness in a disciple as infidelity. If we have received the Spirit of God, He will press through and say—‘Now where does God come in in this relationship, in this mapped-out holiday, in these new books?’ He always presses the point until we learn to make Him our first consideration. Whenever we put other things first, there is confusion.
“Take no thought …”—don’t take the pressure of forethought upon yourself. It is not only wrong to worry, it is infidelity, because worrying means that we do not think that God can look after the practical details of our lives, and it is never anything else that worries us. Have you ever noticed what Jesus said would choke the word He puts in? The devil? No, the cares of this world. It is the little worries always. I will not trust where I cannot see, that is wher…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

May 23

  Hide thyself by the brook
1 Kings 17:3
Not by the river, but by the brook. The river would always contain an abundant supply, but the brook might dry up at any moment.
What does this teach us? God does not place His people in luxuriance here. The world’s abundance might withdraw their affections from Him. He gives them not the river, but the brook. The brook may be running today, tomorrow it may be dried up.
And wherefore does God act thus? To teach us that we are not to rest in His gifts and blessings, but in Himself. This is what our hearts are always doing—resting in the gift, instead of the Giver. Therefore God cannot trust us by the river, for it unconsciously takes up His place in the heart. It is said of Israel that when they were full they forgot God.

F. Whitfield

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.