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Showing posts from May 24, 2016

Ancient tree traditionally is known as Abraham’s Oak, near Hebron, Palestine

Ancient tree traditionally is known as Abraham’s Oak, near Hebron, Palestine






Denarius Featuring Coin-Making Tools

Denarius Featuring Coin-Making Tools


‎This silver Roman denarius, minted about 48 B.C., depicts ancient coin-making tools including an anvil, a hammer, and tongs (reverse). The conical object is either a coin die or the cap of the fire god Vulcan, patron deity of coin makers. The inscription “T. Carisius” names this coin’s maker. The obverse shows the goddess Juno Moneta, in whose temple complex on Rome’s Capitoline Hill many Roman coins were minted. Jesus referred to specific features of coins in Luke 20:24. ‎Matt 22:20, Mark 12:16, Luke 20:24

Mount Carmel: Carmelite Monastery

Mount Carmel: Carmelite Monastery

‎At the northern edge of Mount Carmel stands the largest monastery of the Carmelite Order and the center of its activities. Overlooking the sea, it is befittingly named Stella Maris—the Star of the Sea. The Carmelites believe that the cloud that rose from the sea “like a man’s hand” (I Kings 18:44) after a period of drought symbolizes the Virgin Mary, to whom the monastery is also dedicated. The present monastery, completed in 1836, was built over the remains of previous churches from the Byzantine and Crusader periods. In the courtyard, opposite the entrance, stands a monument commemorating French soldiers who died in the monastery when its first floor served as a hospital for Napoleon’s soldiers in 1799 during his siege of Acco.


Ships

Ships



‎This Assyrian relief shows a rowing boat at the top and beneath it a galley that can be propelled by either oarsmen or sail. The oars made the ship independent of the wind, but galleys without sail had to remain near the Mediterranean coast.
‎James 3:4

The Entrance of the Church of the Nativity

The Entrance of the Church of the Nativity


‎We enter the Church of the Nativity, which is known as the Church of St. Mary. It is situated in the western part of Bethlehem, overlooking a beautiful valley. The church and its neighboring convents seem more like a fortress or a prison than a sanctuary. We enter the church from the west. Its doors are heavy. They stand in an archway of stone not exceeding four feet in height and are very narrow. There was a time, and there have been many times in Palestine when it was perilous to enter this sacred edifice. The Church of St. Mary is the property of three leading sects—the Greeks, the Latins and the Armenians. It is a very ancient structure but has undergone many changes and restorations during the centuries of its history. Tradition carries us back to the third century, and trustworthy tradition finds a church built here by Constantine in the Sixth Century. It is said that the mother of Constantine, the Empress Helena, persuaded her son to…

Connect the Testaments

May 24: On a Mission
1 Chronicles 14:1–15:29; 2 Timothy 1:1–2; Psalm 83

“We’re on a mission from God.” Whenever the Blues Brothers delivered this line, they were met with a less-than-enthusiastic reception. While they had a different “mission” in mind, their famous line summarizes Paul’s ministry, and their reception is strangely related to a pressing problem in our Christian communities today: we’re hesitant to receive those who tell us they’re on God’s mission.
When we hear this “line,” we immediately begin to ask questions inside our heads: Are they offering a critique? Making a threat? Telling us they’re pursuing a ministry role in accordance with the gifts God has given them, or that they want to be directed toward such a role?
Nearly all the godly people in the Bible were appointed directly by God or His messengers to a mission, and they were given very particular (and often unique) gifts to fulfill those missions. So when someone says they’re on a mission from God, we should res…

Morning and Evening

Morning, May 24                                        Go To Evening Reading

         “Blessed be God, which hath not turned away my prayer.”
—Psalm 66:20
In looking back upon the character of our prayers, if we do it honestly, we shall be filled with wonder that God has ever answered them. There may be some who think their prayers worthy of acceptance—as the Pharisee did; but the true Christian, in a more enlightened retrospect, weeps over his prayers, and if he could retrace his steps he would desire to pray more earnestly. Remember, Christian, how cold thy prayers have been. When in thy closet thou shouldst have wrestled as Jacob did; but instead thereof, thy petitions have been faint and few—far removed from that humble, believing, persevering faith, which cries, “I will not let thee go except thou bless me.” Yet, wonderful to say, God has heard these cold prayers of thine, and not only heard, but answered them. Reflect also, how infrequent have been thy prayers unless thou hast be…

My Utmost for His Highest

May 24th
The delight of despair


And when I saw Him, I fell at His feet as dead. Rev. 1:17.

It may be that like the apostle John you know Jesus Christ intimately when suddenly He appears with no familiar characteristic at all, and the only thing you can do is to fall at His feet as dead. There are times when God cannot reveal Himself in any other way than in His majesty, and it is the awfulness of the vision which brings you to the delight of despair; if you are ever to be raised up, it must be by the hand of God.
“He laid His right hand upon me.” In the midst of the awfulness, a touch comes, and you know it is the right hand of Jesus Christ. The right hand not of restraint nor of correction nor of chastisement, but the right hand of the Everlasting Father. Whenever His hand is laid upon you, it is ineffable peace and comfort, the sense that “underneath are the everlasting arms,” full of sustaining and comfort and strength. When once His touch comes, nothing at all can cast you into f…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

May 24

  His kingdom ruleth over all
        Ps. 103:19

His kingdom ruleth over all—therefore thou canst find nothing which is not matter for praise since there is nothing which is not the matter of thy Lord’s gracious permission, or planning, or control. Overall—nowhere canst thou step outside His realm, nor in anything get beyond His care and government. Overall—therefore, take all as from God; hold all as from God; and by thy gratitude give all back to God again, and thus complete the circle, making Him the Alpha and Omega, the Beginning and the Ending of all things.

Mark Guy Pearse

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.