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Showing posts from May 26, 2016

A Famine

A Famine

Excerpt


A famine occurred and the second son ran out of money so that he had to work for a foreigner feeding pigs, something detestable to a Jew. Perhaps the far country was east of the Sea of Galilee where Gentiles tended pigs (cf.8:26-37). In his hunger he longed for the pods—the food he fed the pigs. As a Jew, he could have stooped no lower. The pods were probably carob pods, from tall evergreen carob trees.

In this low condition, he came to his senses (15:17). He decided to go back to his father and work for him. Surely he would be better off to work for his father than for a foreigner. He fully expected to be hired by his father as a servant, not to be taken back as his son.


Martin, John A. “Luke.” The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures. Ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck. Vol. 2. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985. 245. Print.

Need of Endurance

Need of Endurance

Excerpt


The sacrifices which the Hebrews once made proved their confidence—confidence in an unseen future—which they boldly proclaimed; and at the same time they confirmed it. The lesson of the past therefore encouraged them to still further endurance. And such endurance God claims from His people.

Westcott, Brooke Foss, ed. The Epistle to the Hebrews the Greek Text with Notes and Essays. 3d ed. London: Macmillan, 1903. Print. Classic Commentaries on the Greek New Testament.

Canaan

Canaan

Excerpt


Though the land was God’s gift to Israel, it could be won only by hard fighting. The Lord gave them title to the territory but they had to possess it by marching on every part. The boundaries established by God and promised to Abraham (Gen. 15:18-21) and Moses (Deut. 1:6-8) were to extend from the wilderness on the south to the Lebanon mountain range on the north, and from the Euphrates River on the east to the Great Sea, the Mediterranean,on the west. The added expression, all the Hittite country, probably refers not to the extensive empire of that name north of Canaan but to the fact that in ancient times the whole population of Canaan or any part of it was sometimes called “Hittite” (cf. Gen. 15:20). “Pockets” of Hittite peoples existed here and there in Canaan.

Thirty-eight years earlier Joshua had explored this good and fruitful land as 1 of the 12 spies (Num. 13:1-16; there [Num. 13:8] he is called “Hoshea,” a variant spelling of his name). The memory of its beauty a…

“They Will Serve God on This Mountain”

“They Will Serve God on This Mountain”

Exodus 3:12

Excerpt


The verb תַּעַבְדוּן (ta’avdun, “you will serve”) is one of the foremost words for worship in the Torah. Keeping the commandments and serving Yahweh usually sum up the life of faith; the true worshiper seeks to obey him. The highest title anyone can have in the OT is “the servant of Yahweh.” The verb here could be rendered interpretively as “worship,” but it is better to keep it to the basic idea of serving because that emphasizes an important aspect of worship, and it highlights the change from Israel’s serving Egypt, which has been prominent in the earlier chapters. The words “and they” are supplied to clarify for English readers that the subject of the verb is plural (Moses and the people), unlike the other second person forms in vv. 10 and 12, which are singular.


Biblical Studies Press. The NET Bible First Edition; Bible. English. NET Bible.; The NET Bible. Biblical Studies Press, 2005. Print.

Bricks and Tablets with Cuneiform

Bricks and Tablets with Cuneiform 


‎The script shown here, called cuneiform from a Latin phrase meaning “wedge-shaped,” included many wedge-like characters. Though writing implements and surfaces varied, scribes usually used a reed stylus on a clay tablet. Other surfaces included stone, precious metals, and wax-coated wood or ivory. The script’s pictographic origins predate 3500 B.C. The Sumerians developed a distinctly cuneiform script around 3000 B.C., and many Mesopotamian languages adapted it. Babylonian cuneiform marks the objects in this picture. By the second century A.D., scripts based on the Phoenician alphabet had replaced cuneiform. ‎Ezra 1:1, Esth 8:8, Esth 9:30, Dan 5:5

The Apostles Freed by Heaven

The Apostles Freed by Heaven
‎ So many miracles, especially of healing the sick, continued to be performed by the Apostles that “multitudes” were turned to the new Faith, not only in Jerusalem but in all the surrounding country. Crowds followed after Peter as once they had followed after Jesus. The sick were laid in the pathway of the new teacher in confidence that even his passing shadow would make them whole. ‎The chief priests, astonished and afraid because even their express command had not checked the preaching of the Apostles, now seized upon the entire twelve and cast them into prison. Another miracle followed; for the twelve were that same night liberated by an angel. When in the morning the jailers came to drag them before the council of the priests, their cells were empty; and the twelve were found in the Temple, once more preaching to the people. ‎At the command of the soldiers, the Apostles went readily before the council. But when they were again and with threatenings fo…

Connect the Testaments

May 26: A Longsuffering God
1 Chronicles 18:1–20:8; 2 Timothy 2:1–13; Psalm 85

God is longsuffering, but sometimes we take this for granted. How often have we given into temptation, expecting to be obedient at a later date?
Psalm 85 gives a testimony of God’s faithfulness in the past: “O Yahweh, you favored your land. You restored the fortunes of Jacob. You took away the guilt of your people; you covered all their sin. You withdrew all your wrath; you turned from your burning anger” (Psa 85:1–3).
As he experiences that judgment, the psalmist remembers God’s past restoration, and he hopes for it once more: “I will hear what God, Yahweh, will speak, because he will speak peace to his people, even his faithful ones”; he also sets a condition: “but let them not return to folly” (Psa 85:8).
Do we wait until bad times before we realize God’s amazing grace for us?
God’s faithfulness is also expressed in surprising moments in the New Testament, like Paul’s exhortation to Timothy. Paul tells him…

Morning and Evening

Morning, May 26                                        Go To Evening Reading

         “Cast thy burden upon the Lord, and he shall sustain thee.”
         —Psalm 55:22
Care, even though exercised upon legitimate objects, if carried to excess, has in it the nature of sin. The precept to avoid anxious care is earnestly inculcated by our Saviour, again and again; it is reiterated by the apostles; and it is one which cannot be neglected without involving transgression: for the very essence of anxious care is the imagining that we are wiser than God, and the thrusting ourselves into his place to do for him that which he has undertaken to do for us. We attempt to think of that which we fancy he will forget; we labour to take upon ourselves our weary burden, as if he were unable or unwilling to take it for us. Now this disobedience to his plain precept, this unbelief in his Word, this presumption in intruding upon his province, is all sinful. Yet more than this, anxious care often leads to a…

My Utmost for His Highest

May 26th
Think as Jesus taught


Pray without ceasing. 1 Thess. 5:17.

We think rightly or wrongly about prayer according to the conception we have in our minds of prayer. If we think of prayer as the breath in our lungs and the blood from our hearts, we think rightly. The blood flows ceaselessly, and breathing continues ceaselessly; we are not conscious of it, but it is always going on. We are not always conscious of Jesus keeping us in perfect joint with God, but if we are obeying Him, He always is. Prayer is not an exercise, it is the life. Beware of anything that stops ejaculatory prayer. “Pray without ceasing,” keep the childlike habit of ejaculatory prayer in your heart to God all the time.
Jesus never mentioned unanswered prayer; He had the boundless certainty that prayer is always answered. Have we by the Spirit the unspeakable certainty that Jesus had about prayer, or do we think of the times when God does not seem to have answered prayer? “Every one that asketh receiveth.” We …

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

May 26

  Keep thy heart with all diligence: for out of it are the issues of life
Prov. 4:23
He who would keep his heart pure and holy must plant a sentinel at every avenue by which sin may find access there, guarding against none more than the “little” sins, as they are called.
The man of God has his eyes to keep, and so Job said, “I have made a covenant with mine eyes”—his tongue, and hence the exhortation, “Keep thy tongue from evil, and thy lips from speaking guile”—his ears, and hence the warning, “Cease, my son, to hear the instruction that causeth to err”—his feet, and hence David says, “I have refrained my feet from every evil way, that I might keep thy word.” And since there is no gate of the five senses by which the enemy may not come in like a flood, unless the Spirit lift up a standard against him, we have need to guard every port, and write over every portal, “Here there entereth nothing to hurt or to defile.”

Guthrie

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for…