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Showing posts from May 27, 2016

Forum excavations

Forum excavations


The Israelite Encampment

The Israelite Encampment
‎The Book of Numbers describes the layout of the encampment during Israel’s 40 years of wilderness wanderings (2:1–34). The tribes encamped around the tabernacle, both to stay close to the tent of meeting and to defend it against an attack. The four sides by four groups, led by Judah, Reuben, Ephraim, and Dan. The Levites—specially chosen to be close to God—camped around all sides of the tabernacle.

The wickedness of Man

The wickedness of Man

Excerpt


Very much sin was committed in all places, by all sorts of people. Any one might see that the wickedness of man was great: but God saw that every imagination, or purpose, of the thoughts of man’s heart, was only evil continually. This was the bitter root, the corrupt spring. The heart was deceitful and desperately wicked; the principles were corrupt; the habits and dispositions evil. Their designs and devices were wicked. They did evil deliberately, contriving how to do mischief. There was no good among them. God saw man’s wickedness as one injured and wronged by it.

Henry, Matthew, and Thomas Scott. Matthew Henry’s Concise Commentary. Oak Harbor, WA: Logos Research Systems, 1997. Print.

Cairo from the Citadel

Cairo from the Citadel

‎The Citadel of Cairo was built by Saladin in A. D. 1166. It was built of stone brought from the small pyramids of Gizeh. It formed a part of Saladin’s general plan for protecting the town from assault. In its selection, he showed a lack of wisdom, for the citadel is completely commanded by Mount Mokattam. The great ruler chose the spot because of the pure air since it was found, as a historian reports, that meat could be kept fresh at that high altitude twice as long as anywhere else in Cairo. The citadel itself is a small town with a palace built by Mohammed Ali, the mosque of Mohammed Ali, an older mosque built in the year 718 of the Hegira, and which was long the royal mosque of Cairo. From the citadel, a fine view is to be enjoyed. Just below are the arsenal, the Rumeleh—a beautiful public square, the fine mosque of Sultan Hassan, the numerous minarets of Cairo, the ancient windmills, the distant pyramids, and the green plain through which the Nile winds t…

Columned hall from Megiddo

Columned hall from Megiddo
‎ Three-part columned halls were discovered in several major cities in Palestine, mostly near the city gate. Initially, they were considered to be horse barns from the time of Solomon, but this assumption is now abandoned. The first of these structures already appear in the 11th century BCE, but most of them rather date back to the 9th/8th century BCE. These were probably storage rooms and trading centers.

‘Darkness’ in the Gospel of John

‘Darkness’ in the Gospel of John

John 3:19–20
Excerpt


... [darkness] quality regarded as less valuable than light (Eccles. 2:13). Imagery based on darkness is especially prominent in the poetic books where it represents destruction, death, and the underworld (Isa. 5:30;47:5; Ps. 143:3; Job 17:13; cf. Mark 15:33) in a manner similar to that known in other ancient Near Eastern cultures. Conceived as a curse or punishment (Deut. 28:29; Ps. 35:6), darkness characterizes the coming Day of the Lord (Joel 2:2; Amos 5:18). God’s appearance is often accompanied by darkness (1 Kings 8:12), which, according to Gen. 1:2, prevailed prior to creation, although Isa. 45:7 and Ps. 104:20 assert that it was created by God. The Dead Sea Scrolls contrast light and darkness as representing the forces of good and evil, both metaphysically and psychologically; a similar view has been noted in the Gospel of John.


Achtemeier, Paul J., Harper & Row and Society of Biblical Literature. Harper’s Bible dictionary …

Shiloh place of tabernacle

Shiloh place of tabernacle

Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser II

Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser II

‎Second row of bas-relief enlarged. ‎From a Photograph.

Invocation tablet(the so-called Large Amulet)

Invocation tablet(the so-called Large Amulet)

‎The bronze tablet from Mesopotamia (beginning of the 1st millennium BCE) is 13 cm high. The lion head of the Assyrian demon Pazuzu, who was feared as causing diseases but also could chase away other demons, peeks over the amulet’s upper edge. The top row shows the most important Mesopotamian deities with their symbols. The figures in the row beneath are wearing animal masks. They have a mediating function in the exorcism. The third row shows the exorcism procedure itself. The ill person is lying on a bed surrounded by figures in fish clothing; the are exercising a purification ritual. On the right, figures with lion masks are performing the actual exorcism. In the middle of the fourth row, the malicious demoness Lamashtu with lion head is nursing a piglet and a dog on her breasts. She rides an onager through the swamp (lowest row); the onager itself is standing on a two-headed snake. Lamashtu is an evil spirit believed to have caused the…

Philippi acropolis

Philippi acropolis

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

Guthrie







May 27

  Whatsoever ye do.… do all in the name of the Lord Jesus
Col. 3:17
Do little things as if they were great, because of the majesty of the Lord Jesus Christ, who dwells in thee; and do great things as if they were little and easy, because of His omnipotence.

Pascal

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.

Connect the Testaments

May 27: Math: Maybe Not a Mystic Language After All
1 Chronicles 21:1–22:19; 2 Timothy 2:14–26; Psalm 86:1–87:7

In a world of metrics, it’s easy to become obsessed with statistics and start to quantify every aspect of our lives. Stats can even become a type of scorekeeping between churches or pastors: “We have more members than you do.” We may never say those words out loud, but we think them; more than one person has made the mistake of measuring a ministry based on attendance. But God has His own method for measuring success.
Prompted by an adversary (“Satan” is often better translated as “adversary” or “accuser” in the Old Testament), David decides to seek metrics—to count the people of Israel. This account illustrates the harm of seeking gratification or understanding in numbers. In 1 Chronicles 21, major problems emerge from this: including placing an adversary’s will above God’s and predicting God’s will rather than seeking it regularly.
Rather than counting our successes, we sho…

Morning and Evening

Morning, May 27                                       Go To Evening Reading

         “So Mephibosheth dwelt in Jerusalem: for he did eat continually at the king’s table; and was lame on both his feet.”
         —2 Samuel 9:13
Mephibosheth was no great ornament to a royal table, yet he had a continual place at David’s board, because the king could see in his face the features of the beloved Jonathan. Like Mephibosheth, we may cry unto the King of Glory, “What is thy servant, that thou shouldst look upon such a dead dog as I am?” but still the Lord indulges us with most familiar intercourse with himself, because he sees in our countenances the remembrance of his dearly-beloved Jesus. The Lord’s people are dear for another’s sake. Such is the love which the Father bears to his only begotten, that for his sake he raises his lowly brethren from poverty and banishment, to courtly companionship, noble rank, and royal provision. Their deformity shall not rob them of their privileges. Lameness…

My Utmost for His Highest

May 27th
The life that lives


Tarry ye in the city of Jerusalem, until ye be endued with power from on high. Luke 24:49.

The disciples had to tarry until the day of Pentecost not for their own preparation only; they had to wait until the Lord was glorified historically. As soon as He was glorified, what happened? “Therefore being by the right hand of God exalted, and having received of the Father the promise of the Holy Ghost, He hath shed forth this, which ye now see and hear.” The parenthesis in John 7:39 (“For the Holy Ghost was not yet given; because that Jesus was not yet glorified”) does not apply to us; the Holy Ghost has been given, the Lord is glorified; the waiting depends not on God’s providence, but on our fitness.
The Holy Spirit’s influence and power were at work before Pentecost, but He was not here. Immediately Our Lord was glorified in Ascension, the Holy Spirit came into this world, and He has been here ever since. We have to receive the revelation that He is here. T…