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Showing posts from June 2, 2016

Coin of Zeus and Pan

Coin of Zeus and Pan
‎This silver stater, minted about 370 B.C. in Greece’s Arcadia region, depicts Zeus, king of gods (obverse). Pan, whose cult began in Arcadia, sits by his musical instrument, the Pan pipes or “syrinx” (reverse). Here he is the god of hunting, holding a throwing stick used for hunting hares. The monogram “ARK” stands for Arcadia. Worship of Zeus and Pan was widespread in Greece and Hellenized regions. The Lystrans mistook Paul for Zeus (Acts 14:12–13). Caesarea Philippi was a center of Pan worship (Matt 16:13). ‎Matt 16:13, Matt 17:27, Acts 14:12–13

Modern Mount Calvary

Modern Mount Calvary



‎Great authorities are marshaled in favor of both claimants—the church within and the mound without the walls. For a long time, the Church of the Holy Sepulchre was the only traditional spot pointed out as the place of burial. But with the growing influence of the Grotto of Jeremiah, the modern Mount Calvary, a picture of which we give, increased in favor. This whole discussion as to the place where Christ was crucified, and as to the tomb in which His body was placed, turns upon the direction which the walls about Jerusalem took at the time of the crucifixion. If the Church of the Holy Sepulchre was outside the wall at that time, as Dean Stanley thinks it might have been, the chances in favor of its being the place of crucifixion and burial are increased. If, however, the site of this church was inside the wall at that time it is sure that the place of burial and crucifixion was not there, for Christ was crucified outside of the walls of Jerusalem. And supposing…

Golgotha Skull Hill - Jerusalem

Golgotha Skull Hill - Jerusalem


Watch Out, You Need to Live a Godly Life

Watch Out, You Need to Live a Godly Life

Excerpt


The gospel is a doctrine according to godliness, 1Ti 6:3, and is so far from giving the least countenance to sin, that it lays us under the strongest obligation to avoid and subdue it. The apostle urges that all the law is fulfilled in one word, even in this, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. If Christians, who should help one another, and rejoice one another, quarrel, what can be expected but that the God of love should deny his grace, that the Spirit of love should depart, and the evil spirit, who seeks their destruction, should prevail? Happy would it be, if Christians, instead of biting and devouring one another on account of different opinions, would set themselves against sin in themselves, and in the places where they live.


Henry, Matthew, and Thomas Scott. Matthew Henry’s Concise Commentary. Oak Harbor, WA: Logos Research Systems, 1997. Print.

View of Jerusalem from Bethesda

View of Jerusalem from Bethesda

‎Bethesda (house of mercy) is generally supposed to be the pool now called Berkit Isrâêl, within the wall of the city. It is north of the temple and near the St. Stephen’s Gate, which is supposed to occupy the ancient site of the sheep market. It is an immense reservoir, 360 feet long, 130 feet wide and seventy-five feet deep to the rubbish which has accumulated at the bottom. It now rarely contains water. Whether this be the true Bethesda or not we know the true site is not far distant where “an angel went down at a certain season into the pool and troubled the water,” and that not far from this spot stood Jesus, and said: “Wilt thou be made whole?” “Rise, take up thy bed and walk.” Looking southward from this point one gets a magnificent view of that “Holy City which has now occupied a permanent position on the page of history for nearly thirty-eight long centuries. A high battlemented wall, in some places nearly eighty feet high, encompasses the cit…

The Twelve Memorial Stones

The Twelve Memorial Stones


‎Joshua did not immediately advance against Jericho. He had been commanded otherwise. As the people were crossing Jordan, he had appointed twelve men, one from each of the twelve tribes, to carry each a great stone and place it in the midst of the river where the priests had stood with the ark. These twelve stones were to remain in Jordan’s channel as a memorial forever. ‎Furthermore, twelve other stones were plucked out from the bed of the river where they had lain for ages and were borne ashore. With these stones, the Israelites proceeded in triumphant procession to the nearest high point on the western bank of the Jordan, a place called Gilgal. Here they set up the twelve stones as a monument to God’s power; and here at Gilgal, they made their first camp in the promised land. The tabernacle was reërected, and a week was devoted to religious ceremonies. The Passover was celebrated as it had not been celebrated all those forty years in the wilderness. The …

The Serpent

The Serpent

Genesis 3:1

Excerpt


Genesis 3:1 is connected with 2:25 by a Hebrew wordplay: Adam and Eve were “naked” (‘ărûmmîm); and the serpent was more crafty(‘ārûm, “shrewd”) than all. Their nakedness represented the fact that they were oblivious to evil, not knowing where the traps lay, whereas Satan did and would use his craftiness to take advantage of their integrity. That quality of shrewdness or subtleness is not evil in itself (indeed, one of the purposes of the Bible is to make believers so, according to Prov. 1:4, where ‘ārmâh, shrewdness, is trans. “prudence”). But it was used here for an evil purpose.

Ross, Allen P. “Genesis.” The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures. Ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck. Vol. 1. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985. 32. Print.

John’s Imprisonment

John’s Imprisonment

Excerpt


Scholars debate the dates of John the Baptist’s imprisonment and death. It is likely that John began his ministry about a.d. 29 (cf. v. 1), that he was imprisoned the following year, and that he was beheaded not later than a.d. 32. His entire ministry lasted no more than three years—about one year out of prison and two years in prison. (For details on John’s imprisonment and death by beheading see Matt. 14:1-12; Mark 6:14-29; Luke 9:7-9, 19-20.)


Martin, John A. “Luke.” The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures. Ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck. Vol. 2. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985. 212. Print.

Connect the Testaments

June 2: Transformers
2 Chronicles 4:1–6:11; Titus 1:5–9; Psalm 92:1–93:5

Some people are like spectators in their faith communities—they simply watch while others interact, serve, and reach out. But Paul’s instructions to Titus about overseers show us that communities need people who will do more than just show up.
“For it is necessary for the overseer to be blameless as God’s steward, not self-willed, not quick-tempered, not addicted to wine, not violent, not greedy for dishonest gain, but hospitable, loving what is good, prudent, just, devout, self-controlled, holding fast to the faithful message according to the teaching” (Titus 1:7–9).
Titus was counteracting the harm false teachers had caused in the Cretan community (Titus 1:11). He needed the leaders’ assistance to succeed. At first, Paul describes this type of leader as someone who doesn’t commit certain actions—anger, desire for personal gain, drunkenness, or violence. But Paul also realized that leaders did need to take certai…

Morning and Evening

Morning, June 2      Go To Evening Reading

         “For the flesh lusteth against the Spirit, and the Spirit against the flesh.”
         —Galatians 5:17

In every believer’s heart there is a constant struggle between the old nature and the new. The old nature is very active, and loses no opportunity of plying all the weapons of its deadly armoury against newborn grace; while on the other hand, the new nature is ever on the watch to resist and destroy its enemy. Grace within us will employ prayer, and faith, and hope, and love, to cast out the evil; it takes unto it the “whole armour of God,” and wrestles earnestly. These two opposing natures will never cease to struggle so long as we are in this world. The battle of “Christian” with “Apollyon” lasted three hours, but the battle of Christian with himself lasted all the way from the Wicket Gate in the river Jordan. The enemy is so securely entrenched within us that he can never be driven out while we are in this body: but although we …

My Utmost for His Highest

June 2nd
What are you haunted by?


What man is he that feareth the Lord? Psalm 25:12.

What are you haunted by? You will say—‘By nothing,’ but we are all haunted by something, generally by ourselves, or, if we are Christians, by our experience. The Psalmist says we are to be haunted by God. The abiding consciousness of the life is to be God, not thinking about Him. The whole of our life inside and out is to be absolutely haunted by the presence of God. A child’s consciousness is so mother-haunted that although the child is not consciously thinking of its mother, yet when calamity arises, the relationship that abides is that of the mother. So we are to live and move and have our being in God, to look at everything in relation to God because the abiding consciousness of God pushes itself to the front all the time.
If we are haunted by God, nothing else can get in, no cares, no tribulation, no anxieties. We see now why Our Lord so emphasized the sin of worry. How can we dare be so utterly…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

June 2

  A fountain … for sin and for uncleanness
        Zech. 13:1
You that have faith in the Fountain, frequent it. Beware of two errors which are very natural and very disastrous. Beware of thinking any sin too great for it; beware of thinking any sin too small. There is not a sin so little but it may be the germ of everlasting perdition; there is not a sin so enormous but a drop of atoning, blood will wash it away as utterly as if it were drowned in the depths of the sea.

James Hamilton

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.