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Showing posts from June 7, 2016

The Seventh Day, God Rested

The Seventh Day, God Rested

Excerpt


The seventh day was the day of rest, the Sabbath. The structure of verses 2 and 3 in the Hebrew is well ordered in its clauses with parallel emphases on the adjective seventh. The number “seven” often represents the covenant (the verb “swear” is related etymologically); thus, it is no surprise that the Sabbath became the sign of God’s covenant at Sinai (Ex. 31:13, 17).

God blessed the seventh day and made it holy (sanctified it) because it commemorated the completion or cessation of His creative work. God’s Sabbath rest became a predominant motif of Scripture. Here before the Fall it represented the perfect Creation, sanctified and at rest. After the Fall, this rest became a goal to be sought. The establishment of theocratic rest in the land, whether by Moses or by Joshua at the Conquest, demanded faith and obedience. Today believers enter into that Sabbath rest spiritually (Heb. 4:8-10) and will certainly share in its full restoration.


Ross, Allen…

Roman Theater, Scythopolis (Beth Shan)

Roman Theater, Scythopolis (Beth Shan)
‎A partly restored Roman theater at Scythopolis (Beth Shan).

A Prayer for Protection

A Prayer for Protection

John 17:15

Excerpt


The prayer of Jesus was not for God to send something like “rescue [plans]” to evacuate the disciples from their hostile setting in the world. Such a plan would destroy God’s mission through them. Nor was it to wrap them in some plastic, danger-free safety casing where they would never encounter evil. But the prayer of Jesus was to protect them from succumbing to the onslaught of evil or the evil one.


Borchert, Gerald L. John 12–21. Vol. 25B. Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 2002. Print. The New American Commentary.

Jesus and the Woman of Samaria

Jesus and the Woman of Samaria
Jesus and the Woman of Samaria
Fewell, Danna Nolan, and Gary A. Phillips. “Drawn to Excess, or Reading beyond Betrothal.” Ed. Dana Nolan Fewell and Gary A. Phillips. Semeia 77 (1998): 46. Print.

Be Humble Toward One Another

Be Humble Toward One Another

Excerpt


Humility preserves peace and order in all Christian churches and societies; pride disturbs them. Where God gives His grace to be humble, He will give wisdom, faith, and holiness. To be humble, and subject to our reconciled God, will bring greater comfort to the soul than the gratification of pride and ambition. But it is to be in due time; not in thy fancied time, but God’s own wisely appointed time. Does He wait, and wilt not thou? What difficulties will not the firm belief of His wisdom, power, and goodness get over! Then be humble under his hand. Cast “all you care;” personal cares, family cares, cares for the present, and cares for the future, for yourselves, for others, for the church, on God. These are burdensome, and often very sinful, when they arise from unbelief and distrust, when they torture and distract the mind, unfit us for duties, and hinder our delight in the service of God. The remedy is, to cast our care upon God, and leave every e…

Meekness

Meekness

Matthew 5:5

Excerpt


In the NT meekness (prautēs and adjective praus) refers to an inward attitude, whereas *gentleness is expressed rather in outward action. It is part of the fruit of Christlike character produced only by the Spirit (Gal. 5:23, AV). The meek do not present adversity because they accept everything as being the effect of God’s wise and loving purpose for them, so that they accept injuries from men also (as Moses above), knowing that these are permitted by God for their ultimate good (cf. 2 Sa. 16:11). The meekness and gentleness of Christ was the source of Paul’s own plea to the disloyal Corinthians (2 Cor. 10:1). He enjoined meekness as the spirit in which to rebuke an erring brother (2 Tim. 2:25, AV), and when bearing with one another (Eph. 4:2). Similarly, Peter exhorted that the inquiring or arguing heathen should be answered in meekness (1 Pet. 3:15, AV). Supremely meekness is revealed in the character of Jesus (Mt. 11:29, AV; 21:5, av), demonstrated in supe…

Assyrian Soldiers Impale Captives

Assyrian Soldiers Impale

‎In Bible times, victorious armies sometimes impaled defeated enemies on stakes to punish them painfully and to make stark examples of them. The victors exposed these victims at highly visible places to deter others from resisting the conqueror. This detail of a relief from Sennacherib’s Palace in Nineveh shows Assyrian soldiers impaling three Jewish captives outside the gate of Lachish in 701 B.C. The relief is now in the British Museum in London. ‎Deut 21:22–23, 1 Sam 31:10, 2 Chr 32:9, Ezra 6:11, Isa 36:1–2 ‎Image by user Attilios, from Wikimedia Commons. License: Public Domain

Morning and Evening

Morning, June 7                                         Go To Evening Reading

         “Ye that love the Lord hate evil.” —Psalm 97:10
Thou hast good reason to “hate evil,” for only consider what harm it has already wrought thee. Oh, what a world of mischief sin has brought into thy heart! Sin blinded thee so that thou couldst not see the beauty of the Saviour; it made thee deaf so that thou couldst not hear the Redeemer’s tender invitations. Sin turned thy feet into the way of death, and poured poison into the very fountain of thy being; it tainted thy heart, and made it “deceitful above all things, and desperately wicked.” Oh, what a creature thou wast when evil had done its utmost [to thee] before divine grace interposed! Thou wast an heir of wrath even as others; thou didst “run with the multitude to do evil.” Such were all of us; but Paul reminds us, “but ye are [cleanse], but ye are sanctified, but ye are justified in the name of the Lord Jesus, and by the Spirit of our God.” We …

My Utmost for His Highest

June 7th
Don’t slack off

Whatever ye shall ask in My name, that will I do. John 14:13.

Am I fulfilling this ministry of the interior? There is no snare or any danger of infatuation or pride in intercession, it is a hidden ministry that brings forth fruit whereby the Father is glorified. Am I allowing my spiritual life to be frittered away, or am I bringing it all to one centre—the Atonement of my Lord? Is Jesus Christ more and more dominating every interest in my life? If the one central point, the great exerting influence in my life is the Atonement of the Lord, then every phase of My life will bear fruit for Him.
I must take a time to realize what is the central point of power. Do I give one minute out of sixty to concentrate upon it? “If ye abide in Me”—continue to act and think and work from that centre—“ye shall ask what ye will, and it shall be done unto you.” Am I abiding? Am I taking a time to abide? What is the greatest factor of power in my life? Is it work, service, sacrif…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

June 7

  As many of you as have been baptized into Christ have put on Christ
Gal. 3:27
Not simply the righteousness of our Saviour, not simply the beauty of His holiness or the graces of His character, [that] we to put on as a garment. The Lord Himself is our vesture. Every Christian is not only a Christ-bearer but a Christ-wearer. We are so to enter into Him by communion, to be so endued with His presence and imbued with His Spirit that men shall see Him when they behold us, as they see our garments when they look upon our bodies.

A. J. Gordon

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.