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Showing posts from June 16, 2016

The Final Pilgrimage

The Final Pilgrimage

‎Even in the face of that last outcry, Pilate did not wholly yield to the Jewish priests. He was impressed, awed, by this conflict between such deep malignity on the one side, such patient endurance on the other. Again he questioned Jesus but was told with a gentle rebuke that all Rome’s power was only such as God saw fit to give it. Again Pilate pleaded with the Jews until their crafty leaders threatened to accuse him also if he refused to punish this rebel against Rome. ‎Poor, easy-minded man of intellect rather than of force, Pilate yielded then. “Shall I crucify your king?” he asked the rabble. And the priests answered for them with false lip-loyalty, “We have no king but Cæsar.” “Then delivered he him therefore unto them to be crucified. And they took Jesus, and led him away.” ‎The aim of the priesthood was accomplished. The plot of Caiaphas was successful. One man was to die that many might be saved. It was not yet noon on Friday, “Good Friday” to be called…

Acropolis at Sunrise

Acropolis at Sunrise

‎A sunrise view of the Athens Acropolis from the Areopagus (Mars Hill).

Patmos, the Place of Exile

Patmos, the Place of Exile

Revelation 1:9

Excerpt


In Revelation 1:9 John says that he was on the island of Patmos “on account of the word of God and the testimony of Jesus.” He also indicates that he is a fellow participant in their “tribulations.” The Roman historian Tacitus informs us that the Romans used some of the Aegean islands as places of banishment and exile during the 1st century (Annals, 3:68; 4:30; 15:71). Thus the language of the author and the evidence of Tacitus, joined to Christian traditions from the 2nd and 3rd centuries about John’s banishment, support the likelihood that Patmos was a place of exile or political confinement.


Elwell, Walter A., and Barry J. Beitzel. Baker encyclopedia of the Bible 1988 : 1620. Print.

Garden of Gizeh Museum

Garden of Gizeh Museum

‎The Khedivial collection of Egyptian antiquities was formerly exhibited in the Museum at Bûlâk, but it now occupies a large number of rooms in the Palace at Gizeh. This priceless collection which gives us a better idea of the splendor of ancient Egyptian civilization than can be obtained elsewhere was opened to the public in the Palace at Gizeh by H. H. the Khedive on January 12, 1890. Our view is a scene in the garden surrounding the Museum. The walks through this magnificent garden are paved with a Mosaic of round pebbles obtained from the desert. As can be seen in the walk bordering the lakelet in the picture, these pebbles are arranged in the most exquisite designs. Flowers flourish in Egypt all the year round, and Cairene gardens are the admiration of all who visit this Oriental City. An Egyptian poet of the thirteenth century, translated by E. H. Palmer, thus sings of the Gardens of Cairo: ‎The flowers bloomed about the infant Jesus when he was in Egypt …

Roman Muscle Cuirass

Roman Muscle Cuirass

‎The muscle cuirass was a type of body armor designed to fit the wearer's torso, imitating an idealized human physique. It became widespread in Greece in about 400 B.C. Greek and Roman art often shows generals, emperors, and deities wearing such armor. In Roman sculpture, the muscle cuirass often portrays mythological scenes. Lower ranking officers sometimes wore simpler cuirasses in combat situations. The anatomy of muscle cuirasses might be either realistic or abstract. ‎1 Sam 17:38–39, 1 Chr 10:9, Eph 6:11–13

The Temple of Artemis

The Temple of Artemis

‎This temple, called Artemision, was one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. Construction began in the mid-sixth century BC; more than a century later, it was the largest building in Rome, Greece, or Asia. Roughly four times the size of the Parthenon in Athens, it featured 127 columns, each measuring 60 ft. in height. It made Ephesus the center of Artemis worship.

Quirinius

Quirinius

Luke 2:2

Excerpt


Roman consul who held the position of governor (legate) of Syria for several years, beginning in a.d. 6. He is the ‘Quirinius’ (KJV Cyrenius’) of Luke2:2, during whose administration the ‘enrollment’ took place and Jesus was born in Bethlehem. The historian Josephus tells of a census carried out under Quirinius’ authority in a.d. 6 or 7, after the banishment of Archelaus, the ethnarch of Judea, Samaria, and Idumea. The property of Judea’s Roman subjects, now to be governed directly by a Roman prefect, was assessed for the purpose of levying taxes. Apparently this is the census (‘enrollment’) of Luke 2:1-3. Two problems, however, await resolution. The first and most serious is the discrepancy of at least ten years between Luke’s dating of the events surrounding Jesus’ birth to the time of Herod the Great (Luke1:5; cf.Matt.2:1-22), who died in 4 b.c., and Josephus’ dating of Quirinius’ census. The second is the difference between Luke’s reference to ‘all the worl…

Connect the Testaments

June 16: Not Perfect?
Ezra 1:1–2:70; 1 John 3:5–10; Psalm 106:1–15

Sometimes sin can discourage us to the point that we loathe ourselves. At first glance, John’s letter seems to encourage this. Addressing a struggling church community, John seems to call for perfection: “And you know that that one was revealed in order that he might take away sins, and in him there is no sin. Everyone who resides in him does not sin. Everyone who sins has neither seen him nor known him” (1 John 3:5–6). Does this mean that people who struggle with sin are unable to know God?
In his letter, John is actually addressing the false idea that was rampant in the community he addressed—that Christ’s sacrifice had covered sin, and therefore it was permissible to keep sinning. This is an issue that Paul addresses in his letter to the Roman Christians: “Should we go on sinning then, that grace may increase? May it never be!” (Rom 6:2). John answers the same way. He’s not saying that any sin indicates an inability …

Morning and Evening

Morning, June 16                                       Go To Evening Reading

         “And I give unto them eternal life, and they shall never perish.”
         —John 10:28
The Christian should never think or speak lightly of unbelief. For a child of God to mistrust his love, his truth, his faithfulness, must be greatly displeasing to him. How can we ever grieve him by doubting his upholding grace? Christian! it is contrary to every promise of God’s precious Word that thou shouldst ever be forgotten or left to perish. If it could be so, how could he be true who has said, “Can a woman forget her sucking child, that she should not have compassion on the son of her womb? Yea, they may forget, yet will I never forget thee.” What were the value of that promise—“The mountains shall depart, and the hills be removed; but my kindness shall not depart from thee, neither shall the covenant of my peace be removed, saith the Lord that hath mercy on thee.” Where were the truth of Christ’s words—“I…

My Utmost for His Highest

June 16th
What do you make of this


Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friend … I have called you friends. John 15:13, 15.

Jesus does not ask me to die for Him, but to lay down my life for Him. Peter said—“I will lay down my life for Thy sake,” and he meant it; his sense of the heroic was magnificent. It would be a bad thing to be incapable of making such a declaration as Peter made; the sense of our duty is only realized by our sense of the heroic. Has the Lord ever asked you—“Wilt thou lay down thy life for My sake?” It is far easier to die than to lay down the life day in and day out with the sense of the high calling. We are not made for brilliant moments, but we have to walk in the light of them in ordinary ways. There was only one brilliant moment in the life of Jesus, and that was on the Mount of Transfiguration; then He emptied Himself the second time of His glory and came down into the demon-possessed valley. For thirty-three years Jesus …

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

June 16

  I know whom I have believed
    2 Tim. 1:12
Personal acquaintance with Christ is a living thing. Like a tree that uses every hour for growth, it thrives in the sunshine, it is refreshed by rain—even the storm drives it to fasten its grip more firmly in the earth for its support. So, troubled heart, in all experiences, says, “This comes that I may make closer acquaintance with my Lord.”

Selected

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.