Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from June 21, 2016

Floor, Ephesus Theater

Floor, Ephesus Theater

‎The floor of Ephesus theater, where the anti-monotheism riot of Acts 19:29–41 occurred.


Fire as Symbol and Imagery

Fire as Symbol and Imagery

Exodus 3:2, 4

Excerpt


Fire is a common symbol of holiness and in some cases of protection (cf. Zech. 2:5). It represents divine action, with God himself presented as ‘a consuming fire’ (Heb. 12:29; cf. Deut. 4:24). Fire is God’s servant (Ps. 104:4; Heb. 1:7), and his word is like fire (Jer. 23:29). In reference to God’s action, fire is most frequently a symbol of destruction associated with the wrath of God and his jealousy. As a metaphor of God’s holiness, however, it may also purge or purify. The Babylonian exile is described as purification by fire (Ps. 66:12; Isa. 43:2), and certainly the Day of the Lord will purify Israel (Zech. 13:9; cf. 1 Cor. 3:13-15).

Fire is a central element of the description of theophany throughout biblical literature. God’s appearance for covenant with Abraham (Gen. 15:17), the appearance in the burning bush (Exod. 3:2), the leading of Israel with the pillar of fire by night (Exod. 13:21-22), and the appearance in fire on Mount …

The Purpose of Christ’s Death

The Purpose of Christ’s Death

Ephesians 5:26

Excerpt


The purpose of Christ’s death was to make the church holy (hagiasē, “to set apart” for Himself as His own forever; cf. Heb. 2:11; 10:10, 14; 13:12) which He did by cleansing her by the washing with water through the Word. This is not baptismal regeneration for that would be contrary to Paul’s teaching in this book as well as all his other writings and the entire New Testament. Metaphorically, being regenerated is pictured as being cleansed by water (cf. “the washing of rebirth” in Titus 3:5). The “Word” (rhēmati) refers to the “preached Word” that unbelievers hear (cf. rhēma in Eph. 6:17; Rom. 10:8, 17; 1 Peter 1:25).


Hoehner, Harold W. “Ephesians.” The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures. Ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck. Vol. 2. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985. 641. Print.

Summary and Conclusion

Summary and Conclusion

Excerpt


‎When viewed carefully, those sections of the Bible are obviously not arbitrarily put together. Instead, they form a meaningful and purposeful whole, as they convey the progressive unfolding of the theme of the Bible in the person of Christ. The law gives the foundation for Christ, history shows the preparation for Him. In poetry, there is an aspiration for Christ and in prophecy an expectation of Him. The Gospels of the New Testament record the historical manifestation of Christ, the Acts relate the propagation of Christ, the Epistles give the interpretation of Him, and in Revelation is found the consummation of all things in Christ. …


Geisler, Norman L., and William E. Nix. A General Introduction to the Bible. Rev. and expanded. Chicago: Moody Press, 1986. Print.

Athens from Mars Hill

Athens from Mars Hill


‎There is nowhere else such a multitude of commanding positions as in the city of Athens. The site of Athens embraces several lofty hills. One of these is the Areopagus. A city more favorable to a high display of oratory and too powerful effects certainly never existed. Here the “philosophers of fashion,” who taught philosophy and religion, not as a faith, but as a system, came into contact with the thorough earnestness, the profound conviction, the red-hot zeal, of the Apostle Paul. From Mars Hill, the whole city was spread out like a map before the speaker. In the above picture, we are looking toward the northwest, in which we have a view of the whole plain on which Athens was situated with the mountains in the distance. The houses of Athens are for the most part white—some of a marble, some of the firm, fine-grained limestone with which the region abounds, but most of them are stuccoed. The streets are of a respectable width, a few of the old-fashioned narrow…

Visions

Visions

Excerpt


[Visions are] things normally hidden from human eyes. Visions, dreams, and heavenly journeys are closely related phenomena through which secrets are thought to be revealed. These media of revelation are especially characteristic of apocalyptic literature. Visions can be distinguished from theophanies and epiphanies of angels or of Jesus. In theophanies and epiphanies, the emphasis is on the appearance or presence of a heavenly being and often on the message conveyed by that being. In visions, the emphasis is on an object, a scene, or a sequence of events that is enacted.

Accounts of visions have certain typical formal features. They are usually in the first person: the visionary describes his or her experience. The setting is often given near the beginning: the date, place, and time at which the vision occurred. Then follows the content of the vision, usually introduced by the words ‘I saw.’ Sometimes the account concludes with remarks about how the visionary reacted to t…

Tiberias

Tiberias

‎Tiberias. This city on the western shore of the Sea of Galilee, 212 meters below sea level, was built in the years 17–22 A.D. by Herod Antipas, who named the city after his patron, the Roman Emperor Tiberius. For a few hundred years it became the major Jewish spiritual center in the land, where the Jerusalem Talmud was completed and the six books of Mishnah were compiled. From the 5th century, many Christians settled in the city. In 1099 Tiberias was captured by the Crusaders and in 1187 it was destroyed in the war between the Moslems and the Crusaders, after which it remained almost forgotten for some 400 years. In the 18th century, the town’s Jewish community started to grow again until it became the capital of Galilee. Today it is a resort town famous for its hot mineral springs, its beautiful scenery and the many historic sites in the area.

Mt Nebo view of plains of Moab and Dead Sea

Mt Nebo view of plains of Moab and Dead Sea

Connect the Testaments

June 21: Position, Prayer, and Strategy
Nehemiah 1:1–3:32; 1 John 4:13–15; Psalm 108:1–13

Trying to make a difference in the world can be disheartening; it’s easy to feel like merely a drop in the bucket.
When Nehemiah first heard about the suffering of His people, he could have been discouraged. When he learned that the returned exiles were “in great trouble and shame,” living in a city with no walls (Neh 1:3), he could have said, “I’d love to help, but what can I do from this far away?” Instead, he decided to take action (Neh 1:3), and he did so thoughtfully. Rather than making a rash decision, he prayed (Neh 1:4–8). He then volunteered to be the one to help God’s people (Neh 1:9–11), even though doing so meant risking his life.
As the cupbearer to the king, Nehemiah recognized his unique place of influence and acted upon it (Neh 2:1–3). He chose to appear saddened before the most powerful man in the world by hanging his head. His actions could have been perceived as a sign of disres…

Morning and Evening

Morning, June 21Go To Evening Reading

         “Thou art fairer than the children of men.”
—Psalm 45:2
The entire person of Jesus is but as one gem, and his life is all along but one impression of the seal. He is altogether complete; not only in his several parts, but as a gracious all-glorious whole. His character is not a mass of fair colours mixed confusedly, nor a heap of precious stones laid carelessly one upon another; he is a picture of beauty and a breastplate of glory. In him, all the “things of good repute” are in their proper places, and assist in adorning each other. Not one feature in his glorious person attracts attention at the expense of others; but he is perfectly and altogether lovely.

Oh, Jesus! thy power, thy grace, thy justice, thy tenderness, thy truth, thy majesty, and thine immutability make up such a man, or rather such a God-man, as neither heaven nor earth hath seen elsewhere. Thy infancy, thy eternity, thy sufferings, thy triumphs, thy death, and thine immor…

My Utmost for His Highest

June 21st

The ministry of the interior



But ye are … a royal priesthood. 1 Peter 2:9.

By what right do we become “a royal priesthood”? By the right of the Atonement. Are we prepared to leave ourselves resolutely alone and to launch out into the priestly work of prayer? The continual grubbing on the inside to see whether we are what we ought to be, generates a self-centred, morbid type of Christianity, not the robust, simple life of the child of God. Until we get into a right relationship to God, it is a case of hanging on by the skin of our teeth, and we say—‘What a wonderful victory I have got!’ There is nothing indicative of the miracle of Redemption in that. Launch out in reckless belief that the Redemption is complete, and then bother no more about yourself, but begin to do as Jesus Christ said—pray for the friend who comes to you at midnight, pray for the saints, pray for all men. Pray on the realization that you are only perfect in Christ Jesus, not on this plea—‘O Lord, I have d…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

June 21

  These … have turned the world upside down
Acts 17:6
The serene beauty of a holy life is the most powerful influence in the world next to the might of God.

Pascal

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.