Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from June 23, 2016

Armor of God: Belt

Armor of God: Belt

‎The leather belt was tied around a wool tunic. Connected bronze plates hung from the belt to protect the soldier’s groin area.

A Little Leaven

A Little Leaven

Excerpt


“A little leaven leaveneth the whole lump.” And thus this slight error, he says, if not corrected, will have power (as the leaven has with the lump) to lead you into complete Judaism.


John Chrysostom. “Commentary of St. John Chrysostom, Archbishop of Constantinople, on the Epistle of St. Paul the Apostle to the Galatians.” Saint Chrysostom: Homilies on Galatians, Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, Thessalonians, Timothy, Titus, and Philemon. Ed. Philip Schaff. Trans. Gross Alexander with Anonymous. Vol. 13. New York: Christian Literature Company, 1889. 37. Print. A Select Library of the Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers of the Christian Church, First Series.

David’s Flight

David’s Flight


‎Sad indeed was the situation thus established in the family of Saul. The young folk were bound together by the tenderest ties. Michal was David’s beloved wife; Jonathan not only his brother-in-law but his very brother, his closest, most loyal friend, another self. Yet these three had either to submit to the savagery of Saul or rebel against him. Saul’s children loved their father. David also gave him affection, honored him to some extent, and held him in reverence as the “Lord’s anointed.” How could David, who had himself been anointed by the prophet Samuel, declare that that solemn ceremony was of no effect, and rebel against Saul, whose title to the kingship was prior and exactly similar to his own? ‎When David fled from the mad king’s presence, the latter sent men to watch his house and seize him. Michal learned of this; and, making hasty choice between duty to her father and to her husband, she warned David. “If thou save not thy life to-night, to-morrow thou shal…

What are Nations?

What are Nations?

Isaiah 55:4, 5

Excerpt


[Nations are] groups formed on the basis of political or social interests or on kinship. Generally, the word “nations” implies peoples of the world other than the Hebrews, although it can also include the Jews.


Elwell, Walter A., and Philip Wesley Comfort. Tyndale Bible dictionary 2001 : 937. Print. Tyndale Reference Library.

Christian Qualities

Christian Qualities

Excerpt


. Christian growth (vv. 5-7) results in spiritual effectiveness and productivity. The word possess (hyparchōnta, lit. “possessing”) emphasizes that these spiritual qualities “belong to” Christians. However, Christians are to do more than merely possess these virtues. Effective and productive spirituality comes as these qualities are held in increasing measure. There is to be a growth in grace. A believer who does not progress in these seven areas is ineffective (arduous, “idle” or “useless”) and unproductive (lit., “unfruitful”) in his knowledge (epignōsin, “full personal knowledge”; cf. vv.2-3; 2:20) of our Lord Jesus Christ. Unfortunately many Christians know the Lord in salvation but lack the “fruit” of the Spirit and are not advancing spiritually. They remain “infants in Christ” (1 Cor. 3:1), still in need of spiritual “milk” (Heb. 5:12-13). But as Peter urged, believers should “grow in the grace and knowledge (gnōsei) of our Lord and Savior Jesus Chris…

Alexander the Great on Bucephalus

Alexander the Great on Bucephalus


‎This nineteenth-century engraving shows Alexander the Great (356-323 B.C.) astride his famous horse Bucephalus. The horse, born a year after Alexander, was considered too wild to ride until the 13-year old Alexander broke him. King and horse battled Alexander’s enemies together from Alexander’s accession to the Macedonian throne in 336 B.C. until Bucephalus was killed at the Battle of the Hydaspes in what is now Pakistan in 326 B.C. ‎Deut 17:16, Judg 5:22, 1 Kgs 20:20, Esther 6:8–11, Prov 21:31, Rev 6:2–8

The Parable of the Debtors

The Parable of the Debtors


‎The apostles now questioned Jesus more humbly. He urged them to avoid all disputes and forgive all offenses. Peter asked Him: “Lord, how oft shall my brother sin against me, and I forgive him?” The Mosaic law said seven times; but Jesus answered that it should be “seventy times seven,” meaning forever.
‎To enforce this He told the parable of the two debtors. There was a king who sought to collect from one of his officials a debt of ten thousand talents. The official could not pay, so under the law, the king could have reduced him and all his family to beggary and slavery. But at the helpless man’s entreaty, the king forgave him the debt. The released debtor, as he passed rejoicing from his master’s presence, met another, lesser, servant of the king. Now the lesser servant owed the greater one the small sum of a hundred pence. At once this man, just released from his own huge debt, seized his poor debtor by the throat and demanded the money. Finding the poo…

Connect the Testaments

June 23: Discernment and Prayer
Nehemiah 6:1–7:65; 1 John 5:1–5; Psalm 109:16–31

“For all of them sought to frighten us.… And now, God, strengthen my hands” (Neh 6:9).
While God calls us to “love [our] enemies and pray for those who persecute [us]” (Matt 5:44), he also calls us to act with discernment and prayer. Loving others doesn’t mean we should be weak or passive. Part of loving others means discerning their hearts and motives.
“Blessed are the meek because they will inherit the earth” (Matt 5:5). When Jesus spoke about being meek, He wasn’t referring to weakness. Instead, He was teaching us to focus on others rather than ourselves. That doesn’t mean we should be passive toward those who wish to harm us. Part of practicing meekness is being aware of our enemies and dealing with them cautiously. Doing so successfully takes strength and discernment—necessary components of any godly work.
Nehemiah demonstrates these traits in his interactions with his enemies. When his opponents ask …

Morning and Evening

Morning, June 23Go To Evening Reading

         “Ephraim is a cake not turned.” —Hosea 7:8
A cake not turned is uncooked on one side; and so Ephraim was, in many respects, untouched by divine grace: though there was some partial obedience, there was very much rebellion left. My soul, I charge thee, see whether this is thy case. Art thou thorough in the things of God? Has grace gone through the very centre of thy being so as to be felt in its divine operations in all thy powers, thy actions, thy words, and thy thoughts? To be sanctified, spirit, soul, and body, should be thine aim and prayer;. Although sanctification may not be perfect in thee anywhere in degree, yet it must be universal in its action; there must not be the appearance of holiness in one place and more sin in another, else thou, too, wilt is a cake not turned.

A cake not turned is soon cooking on the side nearest the fire.  Band although no man can have too much religion, there are some who seem burnt black with bigoted z…

My Utmost for His Highest

June 23rd
Acquaintance with grief


A Man of sorrows and acquainted with grief. Isaiah 53:3.

We are not acquainted with grief in the way in which Our Lord was acquainted with it; we endure it, we get through it, but we do not become intimate with it. At the beginning of life, we do not reconcile ourselves to the fact of sin. We take a rational view of life and say that a man by controlling his instincts, and by educating himself, can produce a life which will slowly evolve into the life of God. But as we go on, we find the presence of something which we have not taken into consideration, viz., sin, and it upsets all our calculations. Sin has made the basis of things wild and not rational. We have to recognize that sin is a fact, not a defect; sin is a red-handed mutiny against God. Either God or sin must die in my life. The New Testament brings us right down to this one issue. If sin rules in me, God’s life in me will be killed; if God rules in me, sin in me will be killed. There is no…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

June 23

  As thy days, so shall thy strength be.… I can do all things through Christ which strengtheneth me
Deut. 33:25; Phil. 4:13
He will not impose upon you one needless burden. He will not exact more than He knows your strength will bear. He will ask no Peter to come to Him on the water unless He depart at the same time strength and support on the unstable waves. He will not ask you to draw water if the well is too deep, or to withdraw the stone if too heavy. But neither at the same time will He admit as an impossibility that which, as a free and responsible agent, it is in your power to avert. He will not regard as your misfortune what is your crime.


Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.