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Showing posts from July 5, 2016

Gerasa north theater

Gerasa north theater

The Way up to Zion, Jerusalem

The Way up to Zion, Jerusalem

‎From a Photograph by the Phtochrom Co., Ltd.

Diligence

Diligence

Excerpt


Verses3-5 discuss diligence and sloth. Satisfaction of one’s appetite is related to the Lord (v.3); poverty and wealth result from laziness and diligence, respectively (v.4); industry characterizes a wise son and sleep shows a shameful son (v.5). The righteous is literally, “the soul of the righteous.” Since “soul” emphasizes the whole person, God has said here that He meets all one’s needs, including the needs of his body for food (cf. Ps. 37:19, 25). The craving of the wicked refers to their evil desires to bring about destruction and disaster. God can keep them from carrying out such plans. Like many verses in Proverbs, this verse is a generalization. It is usually true that the godly do not starve and that the wicked do not get all they desire.


Buzzell, Sid S. “Proverbs.” The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures. Ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck. Vol. 1. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985. 925. Print.

Tetradrachma of Demetrius I of Macedon

Tetradrachma of Demetrius I of Macedon

‎Macedon’s Demetrius I (reigned 294–288 B.C.) destroyed Ptolemy I’s Egyptian navy at Salamis in 306 B.C. Named king of Cyprus that year, Demetrius earned his sobriquet “Poliorcetes” (“Besieger”) for siege engines he designed while unsuccessfully besieging Rhodes. This silver coin shows him goat-horned like Dionysus, god of revelry; Demetrius’ oppressive licentiousness made many enemies. In 288, disaffected Macedonians joined Demetrius’ foes Lysimachus, Pyrrhus, and Ptolemy I, expelling Demetrius from Macedonia. In Syria in 286 he surrendered to Seleucus I, who imprisoned him; he died in 283. ‎Isa 33:21,1 Macc. 1:7–9, 2 Macc 4:29–41, 2 Macc 6:7, 2 Macc 14:33, 3 Macc 2:29

Solomon’s Temple

Solomon’s Temple
‎The First Temple, erected by King Solomon, was built to replace the Tabernacle and to house the Ark of the Covenant. The Temple was completed in 957 BC after seven years of labor but was destroyed by the Babylonians in 587 BC.

Sinai and Horeb

Sinai and Horeb

Exodus 3:1

Excerpt


The name is probably related to Sin (wilderness of) and may even be an alternate spelling (cf. Ex 16:1; 17:1; Nm 33:11–12). Sin is one name of the ancient moon god that desert dwellers worshiped. The mountain is also called Horeb, mostly in Deuteronomy (see also 1 Kgs 8:9; 19:8; 2 Chr 5:10; Ps 106:19; Mal 4:4).


Elwell, Walter A., and Philip Wesley Comfort. Tyndale Bible dictionary 2001 : 1204. Print. Tyndale Reference Library.

He Lives in Us

He Lives in Us

1 John 3:24
Excerpt


In this section, John provides the believer with certain assurances that accompany being a child of God. With these assurances comes the overwhelming truth that we can stand confidently before God in prayer and rest assured that he will answer our requests.


Akin, Daniel L. 1, 2, 3 John. Vol. 38. Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 2001. Print. The New American Commentary.

Contrasts and Conflicts

Contrasts and Conflicts

Excerpt


Instead of passing judgment on the woman, Jesus passed judgment on the judges! No doubt He was indignant at the way they treated the woman. He was also concerned that such hypocrites should condemn another person and not judge themselves. We do not know what He wrote on the dirt floor of the temple. Was He simply reminding them that the Ten Commandments had been originally written “by the finger of God” (Ex. 31:18), and that He is God? Or was He perhaps reminding them of the warning in Jeremiah 17:13?

It was required by Jewish Law that the accusers cast the first stones (Deut.17:7). Jesus was not asking that sinless men judge the woman, for He was the only sinless Person present. If our judges today had to be perfect, judicial benches would be empty. He was referring to the particular sin of the woman,a sin that can be committed in the heart as well as with the body (Matt. 5:27–30). Convicted by their own consciences, the accusers quietly left the scene, a…

Connect the Testaments

July 5: Discernment, Knowledge, and Action
1 Samuel 10:1–11:15; James 2:14–18; Psalm 119:65–80

We often wonder whether God hears our prayers. Even when we acknowledge that God deals with each petition we send His way, we experience doubt because we don’t understand how He has handled our plea. Yet instead of asking “Is God hearing me?” we should be asking God to help us grow closer to Him and gain a better understanding of His ways. We should echo the words of the psalmist, “You have dealt well with your servant, O Yahweh, according to your word. Teach me good discernment and knowledge, for I believe your commands” (Psa 119:65–66).
We often misunderstand the concepts of discernment and knowledge. Discernment allows us to know God’s will and see the decisions He would have us make. Knowledge helps us to understand God Himself, primarily His character. Both of these concepts are grounded in our relationship with God and others, both empower us to work for Him—and we are called to cultiva…

Morning and Evening

Morning, July 5Go To Evening Reading

         “Called to be saints.” —Romans 1:7
We are very apt to regard the apostolic saints as if they were “saints” in a more especial manner than the other children of God. All are “saints” whom God has called by His grace, and sanctified by His Spirit; but we are apt to look upon the apostles as extraordinary beings, scarcely subject to the same weaknesses and temptations as ourselves. Yet in so doing we are forgetful of this truth, that the nearer a man lives to God the more intensely has he to mourn over his own evil heart; and the more his Master honours him in his service, the more also doth the evil of the flesh vex and tease him day by day. The fact is, if we had seen the apostle Paul, we should have thought him remarkably like the rest of the chosen family: and if we had talked with him, we should have said, “We find that his experience and ours are much the same. He is more faithful, more holy, and more deeply taught than we are, but he ha…

My Utmost for His Highest

July 5th
Don’t calculate without God


Commit thy way unto the Lord; trust also in Him; and He shall bring it to pass. Psalm 37:5.

Don’t calculate without God.
God seems to have a delightful way of upsetting the things we have calculated on without taking Him into account. We get into circumstances which were not chosen by God, and suddenly we find we have been calculating without God; He has not entered in as a living factor. The one thing that keeps us from the possibility of worrying is bringing God in as the greatest factor in all our calculations.
In our religion, it is customary to put God first, but we are apt to think it is an impertinence to put Him first in the practical issues of our lives. If we imagine we have to put on our Sunday moods before we come near to God, we will never come near Him. We must come as we are.
Don’t calculate with the evil in view.
Does God really mean us to take no account of the evil? “Love … taketh, no account of the evil.” Love is not ignorant of…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

July 5

  Isaac dwelt by the well Lahai-roi
Gen. 25:11
Isaac dwelt there and made the well of the living and all-seeing God his constant source of supply. The usual tenor of a man’s life, the dwelling of his soul, is the true test of his state. Let us learn to live in the presence of the living God. Let us pray the Holy Spirit that this day, and every other day, we may feel, “Thou God seest me.” May the Lord Jehovah be as a well to us, delightful, comforting, unfailing, springing up into eternal life. The bottle of the creature cracks and dries up, but the well of the Creator never fails., Happy is he who dwells at the well, and so has abundant and constant supplies near at hand! Glorious Lord, constrain us that we may never leave Thee, but dwell by the well of the living God!

Spurgeon

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.