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The Silent Servant

The Silent Servant

Isaiah 53:7–9
Excerpt


A servant is not permitted to talk back; he or she must submit to the will of the master or mistress. Jesus Christ was silent before those who accused Him as well as those who afflicted Him. He was silent before Caiaphas (Matt. 26:62–63), the chief priests and elders (27:12), Pilate (27:14; John 19:9) and Herod Antipas (Luke 23:9). He did not speak when the soldiers mocked Him and beat Him (1 Peter 2:21–23). This is what impressed the Ethiopian treasurer as he read this passage in Isaiah (Acts 8:26–40).

Isaiah 53:7 speaks of His silence under suffering and verse 8 of His silence when illegally tried and condemned to death. In today’s courts, a person can be found guilty of terrible crimes; but if it can be proved that something in the trial was illegal, the case must be tried again. Everything about His trials was illegal, yet Jesus did not appeal for another trial. “The cup which My Father hath given Me, shall I not drink it?” (John 18:11) More


Wie…

Introduction

Introduction

Excerpt


‎Over the centuries, theologians have offered a number of accounts of the ways in which Jesus has atoning significance. Different theories, analogies, and metaphors have been used in attempts to explain or to illuminate the essential experience and principal testimony of the church; that God has acted in and through Jesus Christ to deal with the fundamental flaw in human existence.
Different understandings of atonement have stressed either the incarnation of God in Jesus, the death of Jesus on the cross, the resurrection of Jesus from the dead, or some combination of these, as being the key atoning act or acts. Most theologians of the Western church have defined the flaw in the relationship between God and humanity in terms of sin and its consequences and have tended to offer accounts of atonement in which the crucifixion of Jesus is the central act and is understood as a sacrifice. One difficulty with many of these views is that they concentrate on the death of Jes…

Lachish gatehouse

Lachish gatehouse

‎Lachish gatehouse where Lachish Letters found

Demon

Demon

James 2:19
Excerpt


The English transliteration of a Greek term (daimōn) originally referring to any one of numerous, vaguely defined spirit beings, either good or bad. In then they are understood as evil spirits opposed to God and God’s people. In the KJV, the term is regularly translated ‘devil,’ a word that appears in the RSV only as the translation of a different Greek termmeaning ‘accuser’ or ‘slanderer’ (diabolos). It is used as a virtual synonym for ‘Satan.’
In the ancient world, there was a widespread belief in spiritual powers or beings that existed in addition to the well-known gods and goddesses. These beings were not understood as necessarily evil, though some might be. The idea that many or even all such beings were allied with the forces of darkness and wickedness only came into focus, probably under the influence of Persian thought, during the intertestamental period of Judaism.


Achtemeier, Paul J., Harper & Row and Society of Biblical Literature. Harper’s Bible di…

Ask For in My Name

Ask For in My Name

John 14:13, 14, 15, 16

Excerpt


(1) Ask for in my name (14.13, 14; 15.16; 16.23, 24, 26) This phrase, always related to a prayer context, is generally translated literally, perhaps due to the influence of Christianprayer practice. Gdsp, one of the few to attempt a dynamic equivalent, uses “as my followers,” which suits the context in each instance. It is based upon the argument that in my name is equivalent to “because of your relation to me” or “because you are mine.” The meaning “on my authority” would also be satisfactory in each of these contexts.


Newman, Barclay Moon, and Eugene Albert Nida. A Handbook on the Gospel of John. New York: United Bible Societies, 1993. Print. UBS Handbook Series.

Sheep in the Figurative Sense

Sheep in the Figurative Sense

Romans 8:36

Excerpt


Throughout the NT the sheep is used in a figurative sense for human beings. Jesus compared Israel to sheep lost (Matt. 10:6; cf. Isa. 53:6) and without a shepherd (Matt. 9:36). Sheep also play a role in several parables of Jesus (Matt. 12:11; 18:12; 25:33) and the Gospel ofJohn pictures Jesus as a protecting shepherd, willing to give his life for his sheep (10:7-9; cf. Ezek.37:24; Ps. 23:1; Heb. 13:20). The people whom Jesus fed he compared to sheep without a shepherd (Mark 6:34) and he ishimself compared to a sheep led to slaughter (Acts 8:32; cf. Isa. 53:7).


Achtemeier, Paul J., Harper & Row and Society of Biblical Literature. Harper’s Bible dictionary 1985 : 938. Print.

Jonathan Welcomes David

Jonathan Welcomes David

‎Though King Saul wavered in his attitude toward David, there was one who did not hesitate. That was the king’s heroic son Jonathan. Jonathan who, in just such spirit as David’s, had won for Saul his earlier great victory over the Philistines, was quick to recognize in the younger man a nature kindred to his own. Perhaps also he felt the coldness of his father’s reception of their deliverer; for it must be remembered that Jonathan himself had suffered from the wild and unjust temper of his father, who would have slain him in the very hour of their greatest victory.
‎So Jonathan welcomed David at once at that first meeting; his soul went out to the victorious youth as to a brother. Perhaps the two young men left Saul’s presence together; for we learn that they made an immediate compact of friendship. “And Jonathan stripped himself of the robe that was upon him, and gave it to David, and his garments, even to his sword, and to his bow, and to his girdle.” If the…

Connect the Testaments

July 11: Best Friends Forever
1 Samuel 18:1–19:24; James 5:13–20; Psalm 120:1–7

This generation has more opportunities for communication than any before it, with email and social networking making it possible to interact with others 24/7. Yet suicide rates are higher than ever, and antidepressant medications have become almost standard fare.

We have more connections than ever before, but they’re not relationships. We still feel alone. People need authentic community—a sense of communing with someone—to feel whole and healthy.
The story of David and Jonathan portrays the true nature of friendship: “the soul of Jonathan became attached to the soul of David, and Jonathan loved him as his own soul” (1 Sam 18:1).

Jonathan could easily have been jealous of his friend; David was a great warrior and had just been brought into the household of Jonathan’s father, the king, as the king’s protégé (1 Sam 17:48–58; 18:2). Instead of being jealous, Jonathan responded with love and kindness, and the t…

Charles H. Morning and Evening: Daily Readings

Morning, July 11 Go To Evening Reading

         “After that, ye have suffered awhile, make you perfect, stablish, strengthen, settle you.”
         —1 Peter 5:10
You have seen the arch of heaven as it spans the plain: glorious are its colours and rare its hues. It is beautiful, but, alas, it passes away, and lo, it is not. The fair colours give way to the fleecy clouds, and the sky is no longer brilliant with the tints of heaven. It is not established. How can it be? A glorious show made up of transitory sunbeams and passing rain-drops, how can it abide? The graces of the Christian character must not resemble the rainbow in its transitory beauty, but, on the contrary, must be established, settled, abiding. Seek, O believer, that every good thing you have may be an abiding thing. May your character not be a writing upon the sand, but an inscription upon the rock! May your faith be no “baseless fabric of a vision,” but may it be built of material able to endure that awful fire which shal…

My Utmost for His Highest

July 11th
The spiritual saint


That I may know Him. Phil. 3:10.

The initiative of the saint is not towards self-realization, but towards knowing Jesus Christ. The spiritual saint never believes circumstances to be haphazard or thinks of his life as secular and sacred; he sees everything he is dumped down in as the means of securing the knowledge of Jesus Christ. There is a reckless abandonment about him. The Holy Spirit is determined that we shall realize Jesus Christ in every domain of life, and He will bring us back to the same point again and again until we do. Self-realization leads to the enthronement of work; whereas the saint enthrones Jesus Christ in his work. Whether it be eating or drinking or washing disciples’ feet, whatever it is, we have to take the initiative of realizing Jesus Christ in it. Every phase of our actual life has its counterpart in the life of Jesus. Our Lord realized His relationship to the Father even in the most menial work. “Jesus knowing … that He was …

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

July 11

  Giving all diligence, add to your faith virtue
2 Peter 1:5
You will find it less easy to unroot faults than to choke them by gaining virtues. Do not think of your faults, still less of others’ faults; in every person who comes near you look for what is good and strong; honor that; rejoice in it, and, as you can, try to imitate it; and your faults will drop off, like dead leaves, when their time comes.

John Ruskin

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.