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Showing posts from July 19, 2016
July 19: Vengeance versus Blessing
2 Samuel 3:1–4:12; 1 Peter 3:8–22; Psalm 135:1–21

Comparing the passages of 2 Sam 3:1–4:12 and 1 Pet 3:8–22 teaches us that all Scripture is for instruction: Some passages provide wisdom on how to become more like Christ, while others are best regarded as “things not to do.”
Peter’s first letter tells us, “be harmonious, sympathetic, showing mutual affection, compassionate, humble, not repaying evil for evil or insult for insult, but [instead] blessing others, because for this reason you were called, so that you could inherit a blessing” (1 Pet 3:8–9). We can find the same lesson, told a different way, in 2 Sam 3:1–4:12. The violence of the war between David and Saul’s houses vividly portrays how acts of vengeance rob us of harmony and blessing.
Some passages in the Bible are beautiful, while others are barbaric. Both teach us we’re not meant to live in vengeance, like the houses of David and Saul. While we realize these individuals often acted agains…

Morning and Evening

Morning, July 19Go To Evening Reading

“The Lord our God hath shewed us his glory.” —Deuteronomy 5:24
God’s great design in all his works is the manifestation of his own glory. Any aim less than this were unworthy of himself. But how shall the glory of God be manifested to such fallen creatures as we are? Man’s eye is not single, he has ever a side glance towards his own honour, has too high an estimate of his own powers, and so is not qualified to behold the glory of the Lord. It is clear, then, that self must stand out of the way, that there may be room for God to be exalted; and this is the reason why he bringeth his people ofttimes into straits and difficulties, that, being made conscious of their own folly and weakness, they may be fitted to behold the majesty of God when he comes forth to work their deliverance. He whose life is one even and a smooth path will see but little of the glory of the Lord, for he has few occasions of self-emptying, and hence, but little fitness for being…

My Utmost for His Highest

July 19th
Mastery over the believer


Ye call Me Master and Lord; and ye say well; for so I am.John 13:13.

Our Lord never insists on having authority; He never says—‘Thou shalt.’ He leaves us perfectly free—so free that we can spit in His face, as men did; so free that we can put Him to death, as men did; and He will never say a word. But when His life has been created in me by His Redemption, I instantly recognize His right to absolute authority over me. It is a moral domination—“Thou art worthy …” It is only the unworthy in me that refuses to bow down to the worthy. If when I meet a man who is more holy than myself, I do not recognize his worthiness and obey what comes through him, it is a revelation of the unworthy in me. God educates us by means of people who are little better than we are, not intellectually, but ‘holily,’ until we get under the domination of the Lord Himself, and then the whole attitude of the life is one of obedience to Him.
If Our Lord insisted upon obedience He …

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

July 19

  Hold thou me up, and I shall be safe
Ps. 119:117
Do not spoil the chime of this morning’s bells by ringing one-half a peal! Do not say, “Hold thou me up,” and stop there, or add, “But all the same, I shall stumble and fall!” Finish the peal with God’s own music, the bright words of faith that He puts into your mouth: “Hold thou me up, and I shall be safe!”

Frances Ridley Havergal

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.