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Showing posts from July 20, 2016

General View of Tyre

General View of Tyre

“Then Jesus went thence and departed into the coast of Tyre and Sidon.” It was here that a woman of Cana—the Syro-Phœnician—made that plea for her daughter grievously vexed with the devil. It was here that Jesus wrought a cure and said to the woman, “O, Woman! great is thy faith!” Tyre is a very ancient city. Its ancient and present name is Sûr. It was powerful as early as 1200 B. C. During Solomon’s reign two hundred years later it had the largest commerce anywhere on the Mediterranean. There were two (or really three) cities. Old Tyre (Palsetyrus) lay on the mainland; on two rocky islands in front of this lay the sea-port, arsenals and storehouses; on the mainland Tyrus, of perfect beauty, made glorious in the midst of the sea, “stood,” with all her palaces, temples, castles, towers, her beautiful gardens and fountains. “Tyre was a fair and beautiful possession” which nearly all the old conquerors wished to make their own. The names of Sargon, King of Assyria,…

Jesus Did it for Us

Jesus Did it for Us

Excerpt


Jesus was not tempted so that the Father could determine the Son’s character and ability, for the Father had already approved the Son (3:22) and would do so again (9:35). Nor was He tempted to give Satan a chance to defeat Him, for Satan probably did not even want this confrontation, knowing that Jesus could overcome his every tactic. Jesus was tempted so that He could personally experience what we go through and so be prepared to assist us (Heb. 2:16–18; 4:14–16) and to show us how we can overcome the evil one by means of theSpirit of God (v. 1) and the Word of God (v. 4). The first Adam was tested in a beautiful garden and failed, but the Last Adam was victorious in a terrible wilderness.


Wiersbe, Warren W. Wiersbe’s Expository Outlines on the New Testament. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1992. Print.

Bearing One Another’s Burdens

Bearing One Another’s Burdens

Excerpt


Paul addressed his advice to “those who are spiritual,” the pneumatikoi. Again, there has been very much scholarly debate about who these “spirituals” were. W. Schmithals, among others, has argued on the basis of this word that Paul was addressing here an incipient party of Gnostics whose disruptive activities among the Galatians had occasioned Paul’s letter in the first place. Although later Gnostics did use the word pneumatikoi as a term of self-designation, there is no reason to believe that Paul was here addressing such a self-conscious heretical group. Another, more plausible interpretation has been set forth by those who detect a note of irony and sarcasm in Paul’s use of this term in the Galatian context. Given the picture that has already emerged, a group of fractious Christians consumed by arrogance, conceit, and selfish ambition, we can well imagine that a group of “Holy Joes” and “Pious Polly's” had formed themselves into a cadre of m…

I am the Bread of Life

I am the Bread of Life

John 6:35

Excerpt


This corrected two more errors in their thinking: (1) The food of which He spoke refers to a Person, not a commodity. (2) And once someone is in right relationship to Jesus, he finds a satisfaction which is everlasting, not temporal. This “I am” statement is the first in a series of momentous “I am” revelations (cf. 8:12; 10:7, 9, 11, 14;11:25; 14:6; 15:1, 5). “Bread of Life” means bread which provides life. Jesus is man’s necessary “food.” In Western culture, bread is often optional, but it was an essential staple then. Jesus promised, He who comes to Me will never go hungry, and he who believes in Me will never be thirsty. The “nevers” are emphatic in Greek.


Blum, Edwin A. “John.” The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures. Ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck. Vol. 2. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985. 295. Print.

The Keys of Death and Hades

The Keys of Death and Hades

Revelation 1:18

Excerpt


...keys are the symbol of authority, and by having been raised from death, the glorified Christ has the power over death and the world of the dead; he has the power to leave people in death or to open the gates of Hades (see Isa 38.10; Matt 16.18 [RSV footnote]) and let its inhabitants leave. This, of course, is a figure for the power to bring the dead to life.


Bratcher, Robert G., and Howard Hatton. A Handbook on the Revelation to John. New York: United Bible Societies, 1993. Print. UBS Handbook Series.

Meribah

Meribah

Numbers 20:13
Excerpt


From the verbs “to test” and “to strive, contend,” respectively, terms referring to a site where the Israelites rebelled against Yahweh in the wilderness. Three distinct traditions of these events are preserved in the Bible. In Exod. 17:1–7 the Israelites camp at Rephidim on the way to Horeb. At Rephidim they complain of thirst to Moses. Yahweh tells Moses to go ahead of the people with some elders to Horeb and strike the mountain so that water will come out of it and the people may drink. The place is called Massah and Meribah because there the Israelites “quarreled” and “tested” God (cf. Ps. 95:8; also Deut. 6:16;9:22, where only Massah is mentioned).

A second tradition locates the rebellion near Kadesh, in the wilderness of Zin, and refers only to Meribah. The focus of this tradition is Yahweh’s judgment on Moses and Aaron. Unlike the Exodus tradition, Yahweh instructs Moses to speak to the rock to produce water, but instead Moses strikes the rock twice. B…

A Samaritan Gives Thanks

A Samaritan Gives Thanks

Excerpt


Only one of the ten men was grateful enough to come first to Jesus and thank Him for His merciful gift of healing. (SeePs. 107:8, 15, 21, and 31.) But the astounding thing is that this man was a Samaritan! Imagine a Samaritan giving thanks to a Jew! But because he did, this man received an even greater gift: he was saved from his sins. “Your faith has made you well” can be translated, “Your faith has saved you” (see7:50, NKJV). Physical healing is a great blessing, but it ends at death; while the blessing of eternal life lasts forever.


Wiersbe, Warren W. Wiersbe’s Expository Outlines on the New Testament. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1992. Print.

What is God’s Kingdom?

What is God’s Kingdom?

Matthew 5:3

Excerpt


The kingdom of God is the major theme of Jesus’ teaching in the gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke. This concept, expressed in various ways, had been a central part of Jewish religious aspirations for generations. At the time of Jesus, it was popularly anticipated as a time when the promises of the Hebrew scriptures concerning the place of Israel in God’s plan would be fulfilled in a dramatic way: the hated Romans would once and for all be driven out of their land, and the people would enjoy a new period of political and religious freedom, and self-determination.

It is no wonder, then, that when Jesus emerged as a travelling prophet after his baptism and the temptations and declared that ‘the time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God is at hand’ (Mark 1:15), people of all kinds showed great interest in what he had to say. This was what they were waiting for: a new kingdom of God that would finally crush the old kingdom of Rome. Moreover, they…
July 20: Serving the Glory of God
2 Samuel 5:1–6:23; 1 Peter 4:1–11; Psalm 136:1–26

When we avoid community, we may develop an inflated opinion of our character. It’s easy to think we’re kind people when we’re not held accountable to others. It’s easy to believe that we’re always right when no one disagrees with us. Conversely, it’s in our relationships that our true selves are revealed. When we’re actively involved in a community, we face hundreds of instances where we need to make choices. These options either serve others, or they serve our desires.
When Peter states, “Above all, keep your love for one another constant, because love covers a large number of sins” (1 Pet 4:8), he’s saying that choosing to love often sets all motives in the right place. It dispels our pride and puts issues into perspective. When we truly love others, it’s not about our pride or “being right.” It’s about helping others grow in faith by using our God-given gifts.
Peter goes on to show just what this loo…

Morning and Evening

Morning, July 20      Go To Evening Reading

         “The earnest of our inheritance.”
         —Ephesians 1:14

Oh! What enlightenment, what joys, what consolation, what delight of heart experienced by that man who has learned to feed on Jesus, and on Jesus alone. The realization which we have of Christ’s preciousness is, in this life, imperfect at the best. As an old writer says, “’Tis but a taste!” We have tasted “that the Lord is gracious,” but we do not yet know how good and kind he is, although what we are aware of his sweetness makes us long for more. We have enjoyed the firstfruits of the Spirit, and they have set us hungering and thirsting for the fullness of the heavenly vintage. We groan within ourselves, waiting for the adoption. Here we are like Israel in the wilderness, who had but one cluster from Eshcol, there we shall be in the vineyard. Here we see the manna falling small, like coriander seed, but there shall we eat the bread of heaven and the old corn of the kingdom…

My Utmost for His Highest

July 20th
Dependent on God’s presence


They that wait upon the Lord … shall walk and not faint. Isaiah 40:31.

There is no thrill in walking; it is the test of all the stable qualities. To “walk and not faint” is the highest reach possible for strength. The word “walk” is used in the Bible to express the character—“John looking on Jesus as He walked, said, Behold the Lamb of God!” There is never anything abstract in the Bible, it is always vivid and real. God does not say—‘Be spiritual,’ but—“Walk before Me.”
When we are in an unhealthy state physically or emotionally, we always want thrills. In the physical domain this will lead to counterfeiting the Holy Ghost; in the emotional life it leads to inordinate affection and the destruction of morality; and in the spiritual domain, if we insist on getting thrills, on mounting up with wings, it will end in the destruction of spirituality.
The reality of God’s presence is not dependent on any place, but only dependent upon the determination …

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

July 20

  Lord, my servant lieth at home sick of the palsy
Matt 8:6
We, in this age of the church, are in the position of that sick servant at Capernaum. To the eye of sense, we are separated from the Saviour. We see Him not—we can touch Him not—the hand cannot steal amid the crowd to catch His garment hem—we cannot hear His loved footsteps as of old on our threshold; but faith penetrates the invisible; the messenger—prayer—meets Him in the streets of the New Jerusalem; and faith and prayer together, the twin delegates from His church below, He has never yet sent empty away.

Macduff

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.