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Akeldama in Jerusalem, Medeba Map

Akeldama in Jerusalem, Medeba Map

‎Maps were rare in ancient times. A probable main reason sixth-century A.D. mosaicists incorporated the Medeba (Madaba) Map into the floor of the Saint George Church in Madaba, Jordan, was to guide pilgrims approaching Jerusalem from the east. Travelers could trust the church’s version of Jerusalem to guide them to Akeldama, “the Field of Blood,” for example, far more safely than they could rely on sometimes unscrupulous or ill-informed “guides.” The two lines of Greek characters in this photo, just below the curving line indicating the city wall, spell “Akeldama.” ‎Judg 5:6, Jer 9:2, Matt 27:8, Luke 24:18, Acts 1:19 ‎Image by user Deror Avi, from Wikimedia Commons. License: CC BY-SA 3.0

Syrian Travelers near Lydda, Palestine

Syrian Travelers near Lydda, Palestine
Syrian Travelers near Lydda, Palestine

Parable of the Ten Virgins

Parable of the Ten Virgins
‎The Apostles, awed by Christ’s prophecy of earth’s destruction, entreated Him to reveal to them at what date these things should come to pass; but the Master refused, warning them instead, “Take ye heed, watch and pray: for ye know not when the time is.” ‎Then to show the point of His refusal, to show why it is better for us all that we know not the period of that final ending, He told the parable of the ten virgins. These ten were to be a guard of honor, attending a bride and bridegroom with lighted lamps. But they knew not at what hour or moment the bridegroom would arrive; they had to wait for him. Now five of the virgins were foolish; therefore they took no care of their lamps of honor but spent the hours of waiting in idleness and frolic. The other five were wise, and they tended their lamps, keeping these ever ready. Suddenly, unexpectedly, the bridegroom came. The wise virgins were in no anxiety; with joy, they took their places in the procession, t…

Stone Tomb Closure Close-Up

Stone Tomb Closure Close-Up
‎A close-up of the stone tomb closure at the Garden Tomb in Jerusalem. Possibly the site of Jesus’ burial and resurrection (John 19:41-42).

Assyrian Slinger

Assyrian Slinger


Casting molds

Casting molds
‎Liquified metal was poured in such stone molds in order to make jewelry and amulets (above), or axes and spears heads (below). When the metal (gold or silver for jewelry, copper or bronze for weapons) was cold, it could easily be taken out of the stone molds. Afterwards only some refinishing was necessary. ‎Exod 25:12; 26:37; 36:36; 37:3, 37:13; 38:5, 38:27; 1 Kings 7:15, 7:46; Isa 40:19; 44:10; Hos 13:2

The Obelisk of Shalmaneser III

The Obelisk of Shalmaneser III

‎This black limestone obelisk depicts five kings conquered by Shalmaneser III, king of Assyria from 858–824 BC. Each side of the obelisk portrays the five kings in postures of submission to Shalmaneser, either in prostration to him or bringing tribute. The second is Jehu of the house of Omri, king of Israel. This account is found only here; it is not recorded in the Bible.

Connect the Testaments

July 26: Courtroom Drama, Daytime TV, and Good Deity
2 Samuel 16:1–17:29; 2 Peter 2:1–11; Psalm 143:1–12

I remember old television courtroom episodes where people beg for forgiveness from a cynical judge when they should seek forgiveness from the person they’ve wronged. Usually, these shows take the irony to the next level: The judge shows less mercy to those who beg, viewing their actions as a further demonstration of their weak character. Thankfully, God is not this kind of judge, though we often falsely characterize Him that way.

At the beginning of Psa 143, the psalmist remarks, “O Yahweh, hear my prayer; listen to my supplications. In your faithfulness answer me” (Psa 143:1). He then adds, “And do not enter into judgment with your servant, because no one alive is righteous before you” (Psa 143:2). The psalmist’s prayers are well spoken, but are they honest? The psalmist goes on, “Teach me to do your will, for you are my God; your Spirit is good. Lead me onto level ground” (Psa 143…

Morning and Evening

Morning, July 26 Go To Evening Reading

“Giving all diligence, add to your faith virtue; and to virtue knowledge, etc.” —2 Peter 1:5, 6
If thou wouldest enjoy the eminent grace of the full assurance of faith, under the blessed Spirit’s influence, and assistance, do what the Scripture tells thee, “Give diligence.” Take care that thy faith is of the right kind—that it is not a mere belief of doctrine, but a simple faith, depending on Christ, and Christ alone. Give diligent heed to thy courage. Plead with God that he would give thee the face of a lion, that thou mayest, with a consciousness of right, go on boldly. Study well the Scriptures, and get knowledge; for a knowledge of doctrine will tend very much to confirm faith. Try to understand God’s Word; let it dwell in thy heart richly.

When thou hast done this, “Add to thy knowledge temperance.” Take heed to thy body: be temperate without. Take heed to thy soul: be temperate within. Get temperance of the lip, life, heart, and thought. Add …

My Utmost for His Highest

July 26th
The account with purity


Out of the heart proceed … Matthew 15:18–20 .

We begin by trusting our ignorance and calling it innocence, by trusting our innocence and calling it purity; and when we hear these rugged statements of Our Lord’s, we shrink and say—‘But I never felt any of those awful things in my heart.’ We resent what Jesus Christ reveals. Either Jesus Christ is the supreme Authority on the human heart, or He is not worth paying any attention to. Am I prepared to trust His penetration, or do I prefer to trust my innocent ignorance? If I make conscious innocence the test, I am likely to come to a place where I find with a shuddering awakening that what Jesus Christ said is true, and I shall be appalled at the possibility of evil and wrong in me. As long as I remain under the refuge of innocence, I am living in a fool’s paradise. If I have never been a blackguard, the reason is a mixture of cowardice and the protection of civilized life; but when I am undressed before …

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

July 26

  Grow in grace, and in the knowledge of our Lord and Saviour, Jesus Christ
2 Peter 3:18
Grace has its dawn as well as day; grace has its green blade, and afterwards its ripe corn in the ear; grace has its babies and its men in Christ. With God’s work there, as with all His works, “in all places of his dominion,” progress is both the prelude and the path to perfection. Therefore we are exhorted to grow in grace, and in the knowledge of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, to go on to perfection, saying with Paul, “I count not myself to have apprehended; but this one thing I do, forgetting those things which are behind, and reaching forth unto those things which are before, I press towards the mark for the prize of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus.”

Guthrie

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.