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The Glory Of God

The Glory Of God

Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser, Sides One and Two

Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser, Sides One and Two

‎The Black Obelisk of Shalmaneser III is an Assyrian bas-relief sculpture in dark limestone. Found by British archaeologist Sir Austen Henry Layard in 1846 in Nimrud (ancient Calah), modern northern Iraq, it commemorates the deeds of King Shalmaneser III (reigned 858–824 B.C.) The second panel from the top on each of the four sides of this stele portrays Israelites. One, kneeling with his face to the ground, may be King Jehu or his ambassador bringing tribute to Shalmaneser around 841 B.C. ‎1 Kgs 19:9–18, 2 Kgs 9:1–10:36, 2 Kgs 12:1, 2 Kgs 13:1, 2 Kgs 14:8, 2 Kgs 15:12

Bust of Merenptah

Bust of Merenptah

‎This Egyptian pharaoh, also called Merneptah, was the 13th son of Ramses II and was nearly 60 years old when he came to power. He reigned from 1213 to 1203 B.C. and commissioned the “Israel Stele.” On this stele he commemorated a campaign to the north of Egypt, in which he claimed to have wiped out Israel. This is the first known ancient Egyptian mention of Israel as a tribe or people. ‎Exod 1:8, 1 Sam 6:6, Ps 25:2, Isa 19:11


Philippi

Philippi
‎The picture shows the ruins of the ancient city Philippi. Since it was located in the important trade route, the Via Egnatia, and was only 15 km away from the Sea, the city was of high agricultural significance. The city is named after Philip II of Macedon, the father of Alexander the Great. Paul visited the place on his second and third missionary journey. ‎Acts 16:12; 20:6; Phil 1:1; 4:15; 1 Thess 2:2

Capernaum

Capernaum

‎Capernaum—“the village of Nahum”—at the north of the Sea of Galilee, the fishing port where Jesus lived after he left Nazareth around 28 A.D. Here he preached in the synagogue, cured the sick and performed miracles. The first group of disciples was formed among the fishermen of Capernaum. Matthew called it “his own city” (Matthew 9:1). The synagogue stands out in white limestone opposite the reconstruction of the octagonal church built in the mid-5th century over St. Peter’s house.

Elijah Raises the Widow’s Son

Elijah Raises the Widow’s Son

Fig. 3. Elijah raises the widow’s son (WC1). Elijah, the child in his hands, the widow and her son at the left, and the child at the right have been gouged. Only the mother at the right is intact. dipinti are found on Elijah’s foot (4 lines) and the foot of the bed (2 lines). Above his thigh is a graffito (2 lines); these are nearly invisible in the photo.
Kelley, Christopher Pierce. “Who Did the Iconoclasm in the Dura Synagogue?” Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research (August) 295 (1994): 64. Print.

Mount Hermon

Mount Hermon

‎Above the red roofs of Israel’s northernmost town—Metulla—the snow-capped Mt. Hermon, facing its western slopes and the Hulah Valley. Some, both Jews and Moslems, believe that this is the Mountain of the Pieces, where God moved among the pieces of the animals sacrificed by Abraham, made a covenant with him and promised him the land “…  from the river of Egypt unto the great river, the river Euphrates” (Genesis 15:9–18).


Reaper

Reaper
‎This Egyptian picture illustrates the corn harvest that happened each spring. The reaper is grabbing the standing grain relatively high and cuts them with a sickle. Following him, another person is gathering the stalks. Stalks that fell loose were to be left in the field so that they the could be gathered by the poor. ‎Ruth 2:4–7; 2 Kings 4:18; Ps 129:7; Isa 17:5; Matt 13:30



Connect the Testaments

August 4: In Grief
Isaiah 7:1–8:22; Luke 2:22–52; Job 2:11–13

It’s difficult to know how to respond to people suffering grief. Those brave enough to speak often attempt to rationalize another’s grief with ill-timed theological truths. Those who feel inadequate or awkward about reaching out to grieving people sometimes avoid them altogether.

Job’s friends are well known for misinterpreting Job’s suffering. But they aren’t often recognized for the moments when they responded to Job’s anguish with wisdom. When Eliphaz, Bildad, and Zophar first heard of the tragedy, they immediately came to comfort Job:

“Thus they lifted up their eyes from afar, but they did not recognize him, so they raised their voice, and they wept, and each man tore his outer garment and threw dust on their heads toward the sky. Then they sat with him on the ground for seven days and seven nights, but no one spoke a word to him because they saw that his suffering was very great” (Job 2:12–13).

Often we try to diminish g…

Morning and Evening

Morning, August 4Go To Evening Reading

“The people that do know their God shall be strong.” —Daniel 11:32
Every believer understands that to know God is the highest and best form of knowledge; and this spiritual knowledge is a source of strength to the Christian. It strengthens his faith. Believers are constantly spoken of in the Scriptures as being persons who are enlightened and taught of the Lord; they are said to “have an unction from the Holy One,” and it is the Spirit’s peculiar office to lead them into all truth, and all this for the increase and the fostering of their faith. Knowledge strengthens love, as well as faith. Knowledge opens the door, and then through that door, we see our Saviour. Or, to use another similitude, knowledge paints the portrait of Jesus, and when we see that portrait then we love him, we cannot love a Christ whom we do not know, at least, to some degree. If we know but little of the excellencies of Jesus, what he has done for us, and what he is doing now…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

August 4

  Created in Christ Jesus unto good works
Eph. 2:10
Let us ask Him to work in us to will those good works, so that our will, without being impaired in its free operation, may be permeated and molded by His will, just as light suffuses the atmosphere without displacing it. And let us also expect that He will infuse into us sufficient strength that we may be able to do His will unto all pleasing. Thus, day by day, our life will be a manifestation of those holy volitions and lovely deeds which shall attest the indwelling and inworking of God. And men shall see our good works, and glorify our Father which is in heaven.

F. B. Meyer

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.