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Showing posts from August 5, 2016

Frankincense Tree

Frankincense Tree

‎The Egyptians prized high-quality, light-colored frankincense for incense, fumigation, and embalming; the first known written record mentioning the resin is in a fifteenth century B.C. Egyptian tomb. Frankincense was a major ingredient in Israelite sanctuary incense and formed part of the showbread offering. It was often associated with myrrh, for example in the eastern wise men’s gifts to the infant Jesus. Since ancient times, people have thought that frankincense had medicinal value. The essential oil distilled from B. sacra showed promising anti-cancer activity in a controlled study in 2011. ‎Lev 5:11, Lev 6:15, Lev 24:7, 1 Chr 9:29, Isa 43:23, Isa 60:6, Isa 66:3, Matt 2:11 ‎Image by user Photohound, from Wikimedia Commons. License: CC BY-SA 2.0

Jesus on the Road to Emmaus

Jesus on the Road to Emmaus

JESUS WAS LATER REVEALED in another way. That day two of them were walking into the country to a village named Emmaus, about seven miles from Jerusalem. They were discussing everything that had taken place. As they talked and reasoned, Jesus Himself approached and walked with them. But they were kept from recognizing Him.
He asked them, “What are you talking about with each other as you walk along with such sad faces?”
One, named Cleopas, answered, “Are You the only One staying in Jerusalem who doesn’t know about the events that have happened there recently?” “What things?”He answered.
“The things about Jesus of Nazareth, a prophet who was powerful in both deed and word before God and all the people. The chief priests and our rulers handed Him over to be condemned to death by crucifixion. We were hoping it was He who would redeem Israel." “What’s more, this is the third day since these things happened, and today some women from our group astonished us. Th…

The Hangman’s Tree, Damascus

The Hangman’s Tree, Damascus

‎This tree is one of the curiosities of the city. It grows not far from the public square in one of the crowded streets. It is a plane tree with deciduous palmate leaves and whitish bark. It is said that the plane tree was highly esteemed in ancient Greece, and that “the youth of Greece were accustomed to assemble under the shade of the plane tree in the groves of Academus to receive lessons in philosophy.” The immense gnarled branches of this great plane tree bear the mark of hoary antiquity, and its trunk is nearly forty feet in circumference. It is not far from the citadel, and one of its branches has been used as a gallows for public execution. The cedar, the plane and the palm tree of the Lebanon and the desert are justly celebrated, and it is to be regretted that in central and southern Palestine the palm and the plane have almost disappeared, though they were once the glory of Jericho and of other ancient cities. What a lesson the great plane tree …

Baptism

Baptism

Excerpt


In fulfillment of the preceding prophecy, John came (egeneto,“appeared”) on the stage of history as the last Old Testament prophet (cf. Luke 7:24-28; 16:16), signaling a turning point in God’s dealings with mankind. John was baptizing in the desert region (erēmō, dry, uninhabited country) and preaching a baptism of repentance. The word “preaching” (kēryssōn) could be rendered “proclaiming as a herald,” appropriate in light of the prediction in Mark 1:2-3.

John’s baptism was no innovation since Jews required Gentiles wanting to be admitted into Judaism to be baptized by self-immersion. The startling new element was that John’s baptism was designed for God’s covenant people, the Jews,and it required their repentance in view of the coming Messiah (cf. Matt. 3:2).

This baptism is described as one relating to or expressive of repentance for (eis) the forgiveness of sins. The Greek preposition eis could be referential (“with reference to”) or purpose (“leading to”) but probably …

Sea of Galilee: Pasture

Sea of Galilee: Pasture

‎Mt. of Beatitudes.“The Lord is my Shepherd; I shall not want. He maketh me to lie down in green pastures; he leadeth me beside the still waters” (Psalm 23:1–2)

Nahal Besor from Tell el-Farah South

Nahal Besor from Tell el-Farah South

The Office of Overseer

The Office of Overseer

1 Timothy 5:22  5:22 Paul warned Timothy of the danger of making hasty appointments to Christian offices. One need not call the practice here ordination, but it has all appearances of referring to an approval for ministry such as appears in Acts 13:3. Paul hinted that one who participates in such an appointment shares in the sinful results that can easily follow.
Paul also appealed for personal purity in Timothy. If Timothy faithfully followed Paul’s emphasis, it would assure that he would find leaders of stable commitment for positions in the church. Paul’s awareness of the sins of others may have led him to remind Timothy of the importance of keeping his own life in order. “Purity” involves separation from immorality and also single-mindedness of purpose. Paul’s concern for Timothy’s purity led him to give other personal advice to Timothy in v. 23.

Lea, Thomas D., and Hayne P. Griffin. 1, 2 Timothy, Titus. Vol. 34. Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1…

Connect the Testaments

August 5: Patterns and Prophecies
Isaiah 9:1–10:19; Luke 3:1–38; Job 3:1–16

Luke sees the events surrounding Jesus’ life through the lens of Isaiah. For Luke, Jesus’ life is Isaiah’s prophecy made tangible and complete. Jesus is the anticipated Messiah, prophet, and savior. Even John the Baptist’s role in Jesus’ life is based on Isaiah’s prophesy. Luke repeats the metaphor of “the wilderness” from Isaiah—used by the prophet to describe the time when the Israelites would come out from their captivity in Babylon—to cast John the Baptist as a central figure in God’s work.

The wilderness metaphor doesn’t originate with Isaiah. He uses it to represent the second time God’s people entered the land He promised them (the term originally comes from the time when the Israelites roamed the wilderness after the exodus). Luke quotes Isaiah in casting John the Baptist as “the voice of one crying out in the wilderness, ‘Prepare the way of the Lord, make his paths straight! Every valley will be filled…

Morning and Evening

Morning, August 5Go To Evening Reading

“We know that all things work together for good to them that love God.”          —Romans 8:28
Upon some points, a believer is absolutely sure. He knows, for instance, that God sits in the stern-sheets of the vessel when it rocks most. He believes that an invisible hand is always on the world’s tiller and that wherever providence may drift, Jehovah steers it. That re-assuring knowledge prepares him for everything. He looks over the raging waters and sees the spirit of Jesus treading the billows, and he hears a voice saying, “It is I, be not afraid.” He knows too that God is always wise, and, knowing this, he is confident that there can be no accidents, no mistakes; that nothing can occur which ought not to arise. He can say, “If I should lose all I have, it is better that I should lose than have, if God so wills: the worst calamity is the wisest and the kindest thing that could befall to me if God ordains it.” “We know that all things work together …

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

August 5

  Go in this thy might … have not I sent thee
Judges 6:14
God never leaves His child to fail when in the path of obedience.

Theodore Cuyler

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.