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The Will of God

The Will of God

Excerpt


The phrase, “the will of God,” has two significations in Scripture: the one is the determination of God—his decree; the other is his desire, that in which he delights—a will, however, which may be frustrated by the perversity of his creatures. It is in this latter sense that the word is here employed. Even your sanctification; complete consecration; holiness taken in its most general sense. Our holiness is the great design of Christ’s death and is the revealed will of God. Some (Olshausen, Lünemann) restrict the term to moral purity and consider the next clause as its explanation (oomp. Rom. 12:1). That ye should abstain from fornication; a vice fearfully prevalent among the heathen, and which, indeed, they hardly regarded as wrong. Especially it was the great sin of Corinth, from which the apostle wrote, the patron goddess of which city was Venus.


Spence-Jones, H. D. M., ed. 1 Thessalonians. London; New York: Funk & Wagnalls Company, 1909. Print. The Pulpit C…

Interior Latin Church of Annunciation, Nazareth

Interior Latin Church of Annunciation, Nazareth

‎It is said, “that the best starting point for a walk through Nazareth is the Latin Monastery.” The Church of the Annunciation is situated within its walls, consequently, it is naturally the first to be visited. In 1620 the famous Druse Emir, Fakr ed Din, subdued this part of Palestine, and by him, permission was given to some Franciscan Monks to build the Church of the Annunciation and a convent near it. Since then Nazareth has continued to be a Christian village. Upon visiting this Franciscan Convent you will be conducted by a solemn, reverend monk of that order into the Church of the Annunciation. You will see its long aisles, its vaulted ceiling, whose arches rest upon four immense pillars. On either side are altars. The high altar is reached by a flight of marble steps on each side. This altar is dedicated to the Angel Gabriel. Behind this altar is the choir, a large, dark and sombre place, from which mass is said at an early hour.…

Diligence

Diligence

Excerpt


Verses3-5 discuss diligence and sloth. Satisfaction of one’s appetite is related to the Lord (v. 3); poverty and wealth result from laziness and diligence, respectively (v. 4); industry characterizes a wise son and sleep is a shameful son (v.5). The righteous is literally, “the soul of the righteous.” Since “soul” emphasizes the whole person, God has said here that He meets all one’s needs, including the needs of his body for food (cf. Ps. 37:19, 25). The craving of the wicked refers to their evil desires to bring about destruction and disaster. God can keep them from carrying out such plans. Like many verse's in Proverbs, this verse is a generalization. It is usually true that the godly do not starve and that the wicked do not get all they desire.


Buzzell, Sid S. “Proverbs.” The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures. Ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck. Vol. 1. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985. 925. Print.

Continuing in the Grace of God

Continuing in the Grace of God

Acts 13:43

Excerpt


The expression rendered keep on living in the grace of God may be variously interpreted. Keep on living, for example, may also represent in Greek the meaning of “rely upon,” “to continue reliance upon,” or “to hold fast to.” The emphasis is on their continuing their relationship to the goodness of God, “urged them to continue to rely on the goodness of God.” One might even say “to continue to trust in the goodness of God.” If come is to preserve the concept of living one may translate “keep on living in dependence on the goodness of God.” In this verse, the term grace is not be understood in any special technical sense in contrast with the Law but is simply a reference to the nature of the Good News which comes to man as an expression of God’s grace of goodness. However, the term “goodness” must be understood not as a particular inherent quality of God but as the way in which he manifests himself toward men, that is, in showing favor and …

Hierapolis tombs

Hierapolis tombs

Nose-Rings of Ancient Egypt

Nose-Rings of Ancient Egypt

John 3:29 3:29 Friend of the Bridegroom
    “The friend who attends the bridegroom waits and listens for him, and is full of joy when he hears the bridegroom’s voice.”
    “The friend who attends the bridegroom” was the person selected by the bridegroom to conduct the marriage negotiations on his part. It was he who carried messages between the bridegroom and the bride during the time of the betrothal (seeMatthew 1:18Pledges of Marriage). Today, the role of best man is loosely based on this tradition.
This position John the Baptist claims for himself figuratively. He is not the Christ but bears a relation to Him similar to that borne by the friend of the bridegroom. He makes the arrangements for bringing Christ, the Bridegroom, to the Church, His bride.

Freeman, James M., and Harold J. Chadwick. Manners & Customs of the Bible. North Brunswick, NJ: Bridge-Logos Publishers, 1998. Print.

Connect the Testaments

August 10: Love, Praise, Forgiveness
Isaiah 20:1–22:25; Luke 7:36–8:15; Job 5:8–16

Our praise for God is often directly connected to accepting and confessing our brokenness. Our capacity to love Him is tied to the realization of how much He has forgiven us.

The woman in Luke 7 who anointed Jesus’ feet is described with one phrase: She was a sinner. We’re not given clarifying detail, but we do know her sin was notorious and, as a result, she was marginalized by society. She was not only weighed down by her sin; her public identity was grounded in it, and she could not hide it. She knew that she needed to receive forgiveness from the only one who could provide it. Her necessity made her bold: She came to Simon the Pharisee’s house to wash and anoint Jesus’ feet.
Her behavior created quite a spectacle. Simon the Pharisee was quick to condemn her actions and question Jesus’ decision to show her compassion. But Jesus turned the tables on him. While the woman was aware of her brokenness—and …

Morning and Evening

Morning, August 10 Go To Evening Reading

         “Christ, who is our life.”          —Colossians 3:4
Paul’s marvelously rich expression indicates, that Christ is the source of our life. “You hath he quickened who were dead in trespasses and sins.” That same voice which brought Lazarus out of the tomb raised us to newness of life. He is now the substance of our spiritual life. It is by his life that we live; he is in us, the hope of glory, the spring of our actions, the central thought which moves every other thought. Christ is the sustenance of our life. What can the Christian feed upon but Jesus’ flesh and blood? “This is the bread which cometh down from heaven, that a man may eat thereof, and not die.” O wayworn pilgrims in this wilderness of sin, you never get a morsel to satisfy the hunger of your spirits, except ye, find it in him! Christ is the solace of our life. All our true joys come from him; and in times of trouble, his presence is our consolation.
There is nothing worth liv…

My Utmost for His Highest

August 10th
The sacrament of the saint


Let them that suffer according to the will of God, commit the keeping of their souls to Him in well-doing. 1 Peter 4:19.

To choose to suffer means that there is something wrong; to choose God’s will even if it means suffering is a very different thing. No healthy saint ever chooses to suffer; he chooses God’s will, as Jesus did, whether it means suffering or not. No saint dare interfere with the discipline of suffering in another saint.

The saint who satisfies the heart of Jesus will make other saints strong and mature for God. The people who do us good are never those who sympathize with us, they always hinder, because sympathy enervates. No one understands a saint but the saint who is nearest to the Saviour. If we accept the sympathy of a saint, the reflex feeling is—‘Well, God is dealing hardly with me.’ That is why Jesus said self-pity was of the devil (see Matt. 16:23). Be merciful to God’s reputation. It is easy to blacken God’s character …

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

August 10

  The Father sent the Son to be the Saviour of the world
1 John 4:14
It is a sweet thought that Jesus Christ did not come forth without His Father’s permission, authority, consent, and assistance. He was sent of the Father that He might be the Saviour of men.… Didst thou ever consider the depth of love in the heart of Jehovah, when God the Father equipped His Son for the great enterprise of mercy? If not, be this thy day’s meditation. The Father sent Him! Contemplate that subject. Think how Jesus works what the Father wills. In the wounds of the dying Saviour see the love of the great I AM. Let every thought of Jesus be also connected with the eternal, ever-blessed God.

Spurgeon

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.

Mediterranean and Minaret, Jaffa

Mediterranean and Minaret, Jaffa

‎A view of the Mediterranean Sea and a minaret (or mosque prayer tower) in Jaffa (biblical Joppa).