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Showing posts from August 15, 2016

Egyptian Standards

Egyptian Standards

A Standing Nude Male Holding a Staff

A Standing Nude Male Holding a Staff

A standing nude male holding a staff would be a typical combination of Greek and Eastern motifs; the naked male the Greek contribution. (Drawing by Julia latesta after Meshorer and Qedar 1999: 16.)
Among the locally made seals are all those that bear names of one of the districts of the satrapy Abar-nahara, including Yehud, Samaria, and Ammon. Some seals mention only the name of the district. Others link the place name with the personal name of a governmental official. From Yehud, for example, a seal was found with the name of “Shelomit, the maidservant of Elnathan, the Governor” (Meyers 1985: 33–38). Other seals mention individuals including “belonging to Elʾazar,” or “belonging to Baruch, son of Shimʾi.” Samarian sealings mention Sanballat, and a certain “Isaiah, the son of Sanballat.” Official sealings from Yehud are inscribed in Aramaic, usually with a plan spelling of the district’s name: YHWH. Some scholars have argued that these seals are to…

Life of a Shepherd

Life of a Shepherd

John 10:11

Excerpt


When evening settled over the land of Palestine, danger lurked. In Bible times lions, wolves, jackals, panthers, leopards, bears, and hyenas were common in the countryside. The life of a shepherd could be dangerous as illustrated by David’s fights with at least one lion and one bear (1 Sam. 17:34-35, 37). Jacob also experienced the labor and toil of being a faithful shepherd (Gen. 31:38-40). Jesus said I am the Good Shepherd (cf. John 10:14). In the Old Testament, God is called the Shepherd of His people (Pss. 23:1; 80:1-2; Ecc. 12:11; Isa. 40:11; Jer. 31:10). Jesus is this to His people, and He came to give His life for their benefit (cf. John 10:14, 17-18; Gal. 1:4; Eph. 5:2, 25; Heb. 9:14). He is also the “Great Shepherd” (Heb. 13:20-21) and “the Chief Shepherd” (1 Peter 5:4).

Blum, Edwin A. “John.” The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures. Ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck. Vol. 2. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985. 310. Prin…

Reading of Isaiah

Reading of Isaiah

Excerpt


Usually in New Testament of public reading.* After the liturgical services which introduced the worship of the synagogue, the “minister” took a role of the law from the ark, removed its case and wrappings, and then called upon someone to read. On the Sabbaths, at least seven persons were called on successively to read portions of the law, none of them consisting of less than three verses. After the law followed a section from the prophets, which was succeeded immediately by a discourse. It was this section which Jesus read and expounded. SeeActs 13:15;Neh. 8:5, 8. For a detailed account of the synagogue-worship, see Edersheim, “Life and Times of Jesus,” i., 430 sq.


Vincent, Marvin Richardson. Word Studies in the New Testament. Vol. 1. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1887. Print.

“Is the Lord’s Hand Waxed Short?”

“Is the Lord’s Hand Waxed Short?”

‎When the numbering of the people was completed the nation set forth joyously, leaving the foot of Sinai, where so much had happened, and marching north toward the promised land of Palestine. Yet the way was long and hard; so that as the days passed, the fickle Israelites began to murmur. For a year they had lived on manna, and they were grown very weary of it. They recalled all the pleasant things they had eaten in Egypt. Especially they longed for meat. Moses knew of their craving and appealed to God for aid; but the great giver of all was displeased that His gifts should be so little valued, and He declared that the people should be punished by being so stuffed with meat that they could eat no more. When Moses questioned how this should be possible with so vast a multitude, and in so bare a region, God answered him with His solemn question, “Is the Lord’s hand waxed short?” ‎Thereon there came a vast cloud of quails, which covered the camp and spr…

Stir Up One Another

Stir Up One Another

Excerpt


“And” (he says) “let us consider one another to provoke unto love and to good works. Not forsaking the assembling of ourselves together, as the manner of some is, but exhorting8 one another and so much the more as ye see the day approaching.” And again in other places, “The Lord is at hand; be careful for nothing.” (Phil. 4:5, Phil. 4:6). “For now is our salvation nearer: Henceforth the time is short.” (Rom. 13:11).

What is, “not forsaking the assembling of ourselves together”? (1 Cor. 7:29). He knew that much strength arises from being together and assembling together. “For where two or three” (it is said) “are gathered together in My name, there am I in the midst of them” (Matt. 18:20); and again, “That they may be One, as we” also are (John 17:11); and, “They had all one heart and [one] soul.” (Acts 4:32). And not this only, but also because love is increased by the gathering [of ourselves] together; and love being increased, of necessity the things of God …

Mediterranean and Minaret, Joffa

Mediterranean and Minaret, Joffa


Connect the Testaments

August 15: Lethal Planning
Isaiah 30:18–32:20; Luke 11:1–36; Job 7:11–21

I’m a planner. I love schedules. The trouble is I sometimes make plans without consulting God. While I often think of this as a modern problem, I’ve discovered that, like many other modern issues, the Bible regularly addresses it. For example, in Isaiah 30:1 Yahweh declares, “Oh rebellious children!… to make a plan, but not from me, and pour out a libation, but not from my Spirit, so as to add sin to sin.”

Apparently, God’s people had been offering libations—a type of drink offering—in the ways of the Egyptians rather than in the ways of Yahweh. We make the same mistake in our lives. We seek wisdom in books or from people before consulting Yahweh. We ask our colleagues what they think before turning to our God. We look to our parents or friends instead of waiting patiently on God’s resolve. We look to our own strength or influence instead of relying on the God who created us.

In our demeanor toward God, we are so …

Morning and Evening: Daily Readings

Morning, August 15Go To Evening Reading

 “Isaac went out to meditate in the field at the eventide.”  —Genesis 24:63
Very admirable was his occupation. If those who spend so many hours in idle company, light reading, and useless pastimes, could learn wisdom, they would find more profitable society and more interesting engagements in meditation than in the vanities which now have such charms for them. We should all know more, live nearer to God, and grow in grace, if we were more alone.

Meditation chews the cud and extracts the real nutriment from the mental food gathered elsewhere. When Jesus is the theme, meditation is sweet indeed. Isaac found Rebecca while engaged in private musings; many others have found their best beloved there.

Very admirable was the choice of place. In the field we have a study hung round with texts for thought. From the cedar to the hyssop, from the soaring eagle down to the chirping grasshopper, from the blue expanse of heaven to a drop of dew, all things are f…

My Utmost for His Highest

August 15th
Signs of the new birth


Ye must be born again. John 3:7.

The answer to the question “How can a man be born when he is old?” is—When he is old enough to die—to die right out to his ‘rag rights,’ to his virtues, to his religion, to everything, and to receive into himself the life which never was there before. The new life manifests itself in conscious repentance and unconscious holiness.
“As many as received Him.” (John 1:12). Is my knowledge of Jesus born of internal spiritual perception, or is it only what I have learned by listening to others? Have I something in my life that connects me with the Lord Jesus as my personal Saviour? All spiritual history must have a personal knowledge for its bedrock. To be born again means that I see Jesus.

“Except a man be born again, he cannot see the kingdom of God.” (John 3:3). Do I seek for signs of the Kingdom, or do I perceive God’s rule? The new birth gives a new power of vision whereby I begin to discern God’s rule. His rule was the…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

August 15

  Thou shall have no other gods before me
Exod. 20:3
If you find yourself beginning to love any pleasure better than your prayers, any book better than your Bible, any house better than God’s, any table better than the Lord’s, any person better than your Saviour, anyone better than your soul, a present indulgence better than the hope of Heaven—take alarm!

Guthrie

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.