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Showing posts from August 17, 2016

Biblical Theology

Biblical Theology

Excerpt


‎Biblical theology is theology drawn from the Bible rather than theology imposed onto the Bible. Biblical theology helps Christians understand the broad biblical message, discern developments in the canon, and see how each particular text fits in with the larger story of Scripture. In studying biblical theology, interpreters try to determine what the authors of the Bible thought or believed in their own historical contexts and on their own distinctive terms.

‎Historical research plays a significant role in biblical theology. Interpreters focus on understanding what the biblical texts meant for the original author and readers, rather than on the development of doctrine over time (historical theology). Before Christians can apply Scripture accurately to the present or systematize it around various topics, they must first interpret it correctly in its historical context and with its original intended meaning. Biblical theology lays a foundation upon which syste…

A Samaritan Gives Thanks

A Samaritan Gives Thanks

Excerpt


Only one of the ten men was grateful enough to come first to Jesus and thank Him for His merciful gift of healing. (See Ps. 107:8, 15, 21, and 31.) But the astounding thing is that this man was a Samaritan! Imagine a Samaritan giving thanks to a Jew! But because he did, this man received an even greater gift: he was saved from his sins. “Your faith has made you well” can be translated, “Your faith has saved you” (see7:50, NKJV). Physical healing is a great blessing, but it ends at death; while the blessing of eternal life lasts forever.


Wiersbe, Warren W. Wiersbe’s Expository Outlines on the New Testament. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1992. Print.

Water

Water

Isaiah 55:1

Excerpt


In the East, water is a precious ingredient; and an abundance of water is a special blessing (41:17; 44:3). Wine, milk, and bread were staples of their diet. The people were living on substitutes that did not nourish them. They needed “the real thing,” which only the Lord could give. In Scripture, both water and wine are pictures of the Holy Spirit (John 7:37–39; Eph. 5:18). Jesus is the “bread of life” (John 6:32–35), and His living Word is like milk (1 Peter 2:2). Our Lord probably had Isaiah 55:2 in mind when He said, “Do not labor for the food which perishes, but for the food which endures to everlasting life” (John 6:27, NKJV).


Wiersbe, Warren W. Be Comforted. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1996. Print. “Be” Commentary Series.

John Owen (1616–1683)

John Owen (1616–1683)


Bunyan’s preaching and writings found ready acceptance among England’s poorer classes, but appreciation for his work was not limited to those of humble condition. Among the educated and prominent men with whom Bunyan shared ideas and pulpits was Dr. John Owen.
The son of a Puritan Minister in Stadhampton near Oxford, Owen graduated from Queen’s College, Oxford, at 16 years of age, and was ordained a few years later. He served as chaplain to two Puritan families, then was appointed by Parliament to the Fordham parish in Essex. Owen became increasingly Congregational in his views on church government, expounding Congregational principles in his writings, and modelling them in his church. He worked closely with Oliver Cromwell and served as his chaplain in 1650. The next year Owen was appointed Dean of Christ Church, Oxford. From 1652 to 1657 he served as Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University.
With the restoration of the monarchy in 1660, Owen was dismissed from Chr…

Preparing Flax and Making Rope and Cloth

Preparing Flax and Making Rope and Cloth

‎This image shows Egyptians working with flax. Laborers (1, 2) carry water up steps (a) to soaking pits (b). A laborer (3) lays soaked flax out to dry (c). (D) shows fresh-cut flax. Laborers (4, 5, 6) beat flax on stones (f) with mallets (e) to separate fibers. Workers (7, 8) strike yarn on stone (g). Workers (9, 10) twist yarn into a rope (h). Workers (11, 12) show finished cloth (i) to an overseer (13). Linen was the only cloth allowed for wrapping mummies. The Egyptians sold linen to all their trading partners, but the Jews also produced it in Palestine. ‎Exod 28:42, Josh 2:6, Prov 7:16, Prov 31:13, Mark 15:46, Rev 19:8, 14

A Silver Denarius

A Silver Denarius
‎When the Pharisees asked Jesus if it was lawful to pay taxes to Caesar, Jesus asked to see a coin for the tax. They gave Him a denarius like this. The motto on this coin proclaims Tiberius to be the son of the divine Caesar who preceded him. Jesus, the true Son of God, would have recognized the irony of Tiberius’ claim (Matt 22:17–22; Mark 12:14–17; Luke 20:21–26).

Behold the Lamb of God

Behold the Lamb of God

Excerpt


And steadfastly regarding (see Mark. 10:21, 27; Luke 20:17; 22:61)—with eager and penetrating glance, as though something might be learned from his slightest movements—Jesus as he walked; “walked,” not towards John, as on the previous day, but in some opposite direction. This implies that their relative functions were not identical, and not to be confounded. This is the last time when the Baptist and the Christ were together, and the sublime meekness of John and his surrender of all primary claims to deference throw light on the unspeakable and gentle dignity of Jesus. He saith, Behold the Lamb of God. The simple phrase, without further exposition, implies that he was recalling to their minds the mighty appellation which he had bestowed upon the Saviour on the previous day, with all the additional interpretation of the term with which it had then been accompanied. The brevity of the cry here marks the emphasis which it bore, and the rich associations it al…

Connect the Testaments

August 17: Anxiety and the Wilderness
Isaiah 35:1–37:13; Luke 12:22–59; Job 8:11–22

Anxiety has a way of ruling over us. Although many of our concerns are legitimate—like having money to pay the rent and buy food—some of them are nonsensical. We envision future catastrophes and spend our days worrying about what might never happen, creating an emotional wilderness for ourselves.

Anxiety isn’t new. The prophet Isaiah addresses the problem: “Wilderness and dry land shall be glad, and desert shall rejoice and blossom like the crocus.… Say to those who are hasty of heart, ‘Be strong; you must not fear! Look! your God will come with vengeance, with divine retribution. He is the one who will come and save you’ ” (Isa 35:1, 4).

Isaiah realizes that there is a time and season for everything. He proclaims that God will bring the people out of the wilderness (their exile in Babylon) and back into their land. There is an answer to the anxiety, pain, and worry that they feel about the future. His …

Morning and Evening

Morning, August 17Go To Evening Reading

“The mercy of God.” —Psalm 52:8
Meditate a little on this mercy of the Lord. It is a tender mercy. With gentle, loving touch, he healeth the broken in heart and bindeth up their wounds. He is as gracious in the manner of his mercy as in the matter of it. It is a great mercy. There is nothing little in God; his mercy is like himself—it is infinite. You cannot measure it. His mercy is so great that it forgives great sins to great sinners, after great lengths of time, and then gives great favours and great privileges, and raises us up to great enjoyments in the great heaven of the great God. It is undeserved mercy, as indeed all true mercy must be, for deserved mercy is only a misnomer for justice. There was no right on the sinner’s part to the kind consideration of the Most High; had the rebel been doomed at once to eternal fire he would have richly merited the doom, and if delivered from wrath, sovereign love alone has found a cause, for there was …

My Utmost for His Highest

August 17th
Are you discouraged in devotion?


Yet lackest thou one thing; sell all that thou hast … and come, follow Me. Luke 18:22.

“And when he heard this …” Have you ever heard the Master say a hard word? If you have not, I question whether you have heard Him say anything. Jesus Christ says a great deal that we listen to, but do not hear; when we do hear, His words are amazingly hard.
Jesus did not seem in the least solicitous that this man should do what He told him, He made no attempt to keep him with Him. He simply said—‘Sell all you have, and come, follow Me.’ Our Lord never pleaded, He never cajoled, He never entrapped; He simply spoke the sternest words mortal ears ever listened to, and then left it alone.

Have I ever heard Jesus say a hard word? Has He said something personally to me to which I have deliberately listened? Not something I can expound or say this and that about, but something I have heard Him say to me? This man did understand what Jesus said, he heard it and h…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

August 17

  Serving the Lord with all humility of mind
Acts 20:19
There is a legend of an artist who long sought for a piece of sandalwood, out of which to carve a Madonna. He was about to give up in despair, leaving the vision of his life unrealized, when in a dream he was bidden to carve his Madonna from a block of oak wood, which was destined for the fire. He obeyed, and produced a masterpiece from a log of common fire-wood.

Many of us lose great opportunities in life by waiting to find sandalwood for our carvings, when they really lie hidden in the common logs that we burn.

Orison Swett Marden

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.