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Showing posts from August 26, 2016

Hyena

Hyena

Approach to the Nile Bridge

Approach to the Nile Bridge

‎In the olden time, as in 1863, when the writer first visited Egypt, the passage of the Nile was made by a small ferry boat in company with horses, donkeys, peddlers, farmers, beggars, tourists—a motley crowd. Now, one may cross the bridge Kasar en-Nil. It is a bridge of iron one thousand two hundred and sixty feet long and has strong stone buttresses. It is a comfortable thing in these days to take a carriage instead of a donkey, in Cairo, to cross the bridge instead of a ferry and to enjoy an unbroken ride over a smooth, finely macadamized road under the shade of acacia trees to the foot of the ridge on which the pyramids stand. We went in 1863 on a donkey over a narrow tortuous path, and what required several hours at that time may now be accomplished in about an hour and a half. It is sometimes the case that the bridge is swung open for two hours at the time for the passage of boats, and it behooves the tourist to watch the right time for leaving his h…

Egyptian Swords

Egyptian Swords

Fishermen’s Houses, Beyrout

Fishermen’s Houses, Beyrout

‎Beyrout was celebrated in the third century as a seat of learning. Students flocked to her from all parts of the known world. It is said that Gregory Thaumacurgus even passed by Athens and Alexandria to study law at this place. It continued to be a seat of learning until the year 551 when the city was destroyed by an earthquake. It is now the most modern looking city in the East and contains a population of one hundred and ten thousand. The European appearance which Beyrout presents and its prosperity are entirely owing to the foreign influence. The principal article of export is raw silk, and Lebanon is in fact, becoming one vast mulberry plantation. Fishing has become one of its chief industries, and its bay is just such a harbor as fishermen appreciate and delight in. The fisheries are extensive and profitable. The Syrian Protestant College established many years ago by the Presbyterians, has been one of the most important factors in the prosperity of …

Hittites

Hittites



The Harem of Xerxes

The Harem of Xerxes
‎A harem was always part of the ruler’s palace. Political marriages were important peacekeeping and trade-securing operations. In contrast to the common people, a king could have several wives, who were living in a special, adequately furnished compound. ‎Esther 2:11

Transgressors of the Law

Transgressors of the Law


  2.      COMPASSION FOR ALL (2:5–9)
2:5–7. With the plea, Listen, my dear brothers, James went on to explain why their preferential judgment was wrong. He made his point through four questions, each of which anticipated an affirmative answer. First, Has not God chosen those who appear poor materially, but are rich spiritually, to inherit His promised kingdom? (cf. 1:9) Second, Are not the rich the ones who are consistently guilty of oppression, extortion, and slander (blasphēmousin, 2:7, lit., “blasphemy”). Third, Are they not the ones who are dragging you into court? Fourth, Are they not the ones who slander Jesus’ noble name? Believers belong to Him, not to the rich exploiters. James’ readers would have to agree with these contentions, and to recognize that insulting the poor and favoring the rich was wrong and totally unreasonable.

Blue, J. Ronald. “James.” The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures. Ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck. …

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

August 26

  If we suffer, we shall also reign with him
2 Tim. 2:12
The photographer must have a negative, as he calls it, in order to furnish you with a picture. Now, the earthly cross is the negativity from which the heavenly crown is to be made; the suffering and sorrow of the present time determining the glory, honor, and immortality of the life to come.

A. J. Gordon


Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.

Connect the Testaments

August 26: Lives of Spiritual Opulence
Isaiah 52:1–54:17; Luke 20:41–21:24; Job 12:1–12

The Pharisees upheld a faulty religious system. They were supposed to be the Jews’ spiritual leaders, but they were more interested in making themselves the religious elite. They loved “greetings in the marketplace and the best seats in the synagogues and the places of honor at banquets” (Luke 20:46). Their ministry was built on the backs of the poor.

In contrast, the widow depicted in Luke 21 chose to give all she had. Because she had so little, her generosity was sacrificial. Those who gave out of abundance didn’t feel the loss of income like she did. But the contrast between the widow and the Pharisees shows us much more. Luke says that spiritual wealth can be present where we least expect it—that things aren’t always as they appear.

Although Jesus is the long-anticipated Messiah, following Him is never going to bring a life of glory and fame. Jesus is ushering in a kingdom like a mustard seed (L…

My Utmost for His Highest

August 26th

Are you ever disturbed?



Peace I leave with you, My peace I give unto you. John 14:27.

There are times when our peace is based upon ignorance, but when we awaken to the facts of life, inner peace is impossible unless it is received from Jesus. When Our Lord speaks peace, He makes peace, His words are ever “spirit and life.” Have I ever received what Jesus speaks? “My peace I give unto you”—it is a peace which comes from looking into His face and realizing His undisturbedness.

Are you painfully disturbed just now, distracted by the waves and billows of God’s providential permission, and having, as it were, turned over the boulders of your belief, are you still finding no well of peace or joy or comfort; is all barren? Then look up and receive the undisturbedness of the Lord Jesus. Reflected peace is the proof that you are right with God because you are at liberty to turn your mind to Him. If you are not right with God, you can never turn your mind anywhere but on yourself. I…

Morning and Evening

Morning, August 26Go To Evening Reading

“He hath commanded his covenant for ever.” —Psalms 111:9
The Lord’s people delight in the covenant itself. It is an unfailing source of consolation to them so often as the Holy Spirit leads them into its banqueting house and waves its banner of love. They delight to contemplate the antiquity of that covenant, remembering that before the day-star knew its place or planets ran their round, the interests of the saints were made secure in Christ Jesus. It is peculiarly pleasing to them to remember the sureness of the covenant while meditating upon “the sure mercies of David.” They delight to celebrate it as “signed, and sealed, and ratified, in all things ordered well.” It often makes their hearts dilate with joy to think of its immutability, as a covenant which neither time nor eternity, life nor death, shall ever be able to violate—a covenant as old as eternity and as everlasting as the Rock of ages. They rejoice also to feast upon the fulness of th…