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Adjeroud

Adjeroud


“Apostleship” Outside of the New Testament

“Apostleship” Outside of the New Testament

Galatians 1:1

Excerpt


The Greek word for “apostle” is not used outside the NT in the same sense as it is in the NT. It is derived from the verb “to send” and is at home in the language of the sea meaning a particular “ship” or “group of ships,” a “marine expedition” or “the leader” of such. Its usage is almost always impersonal and thoroughly passive. There is no hint of personal initiative or authorization, merely the connotation of something being sent. Later papyri use the word to mean “bill” or “invoice” or even a “passport,” continuing to reflect the vocabulary of maritime affairs.


Elwell, Walter A., and Philip Wesley Comfort. Tyndale Bible dictionary 2001 : 96. Print. Tyndale Reference Library.

Origins of the Samaritans

Origins of the Samaritans




John 4:1–45
Excerpt


Samaritan [is] in the OT an ethnic term for the residents of the district of Samaria. The term appears only once (2 Kings 17:29) in the account of the settlement of Mesopotamian colonists in the region by the Assyrians, in the comment that these foreign people made gods of their own which they placed ‘in the shrines of the high places which the Samaritans had made.’ In the NT, however, the term is used exclusively for the members of a particular ethno-religious community based in the area, living for the most part around Mt. Gerizim (John 4:1-42) but residing also in their own villages throughout the region (Matt.10:5; Luke 9:52), who might be encountered in villages neighboring on Samaria (Luke 17:11-19) or even on the roadway between Jerusalem and Jericho (Luke 10:29-37).


Achtemeier, Paul J., Harper & Row and Society of Biblical Literature.Harper’s Bible dictionary 1985 : 898. Print.

Contrasting Outcomes

Contrasting Outcomes




Excerpt


“Blessings are upon the head of the righteous.” Either God rewards the righteous person with blessings, or others bestow their blessings upon him because of his righteousness. On the other hand, “the mouth of the wicked conceals violence,”i.e. so that he may wait for the opportunity of practicing violence. The idea is that the wicked plot the ruin of their neighbors and thus incur their curses instead of their blessings. The verse indicates the contrast between the manifest blessedness of the righteous and the sinister activities of the wicked.


Smith, James E. The Wisdom Literature, and Psalms. Joplin, MO: College Press Pub. Co., 1996. Print. Old Testament Survey Series.

Bronze Serpent

Bronze Serpent

‎Numbers 21:4–9 tells that bitter complaining against God and Moses by the Israelites led to punishment from the Lord. Fiery serpents were sent among them, biting them, causing many to die. Once the Israelites repented Moses prayed to the Lord for deliverance. The Lord instructed Moses to make a bronze serpent, set on a pole. If any Israelite was bitten, they would only need to look up at the bronze serpent to live.

Obelisk in Heliopolis, Egypt, the Biblical On

Obelisk in Heliopolis, Egypt, the Biblical On

‎The biblical On, home of Joseph’s father-in-law (Gen 41:45), was in an area that is now a northeastern suburb of the city of Cairo. The Greeks named the city Heliopolis, “City of the Sun,” because it was dedicated to the worship of the sun god Ra. The ancient ruins are largely gone or obscured now because the builders of Cairo buried them or used parts of them over the centuries for building materials. This obelisk is one of the few remaining monuments of ancient Heliopolis. ‎Gen 41:45, Gen 46:20, Jer 43:13, Ezek 30:17

The Setting for the Sign

The Setting for the Sign




Excerpt


Like the name of Lazarus, the sisters, Mary and Martha, also are mentioned in the Gospel of Luke(10:38–42). In both contexts, Martha is represented primarily as a rather determined worker (Luke 10:41: cf. John 12:2) and Mary as the worshipful one (Luke 10:39, 42; cf. John 11:2; 12:3). In this present context, an interesting technique of storytelling is employed. Mary the sister of Lazarus is identified here before the event as the one who anointed the Lord and wiped his feet with her hair (11:2; cf.12:3).That loving, sacrificial event must have seared itself into the minds of the early Christians, as both Mark (14:9) and Matthew (26:13) bear witness. For John, who constantly had in mind the death of the Lamb, this reference serves as a window into Jesus’ acceptance of his death (cf. John 12:7). But perhaps there is more to this remark. John generally avoided the post-resurrection confessional use of kyrios, “Lord,” up to this point (cf. however, my re…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

September 7

  The God of hope fill you with all joy and peace in believing, that ye may abound in hope, through the power of the Holy Ghost
Rom. 15:13

In spiritual as in earthly things there is a great strength in hope, and, therefore, God’s people are careful to cultivate that grace. A well-grounded hope that, having been made new creatures in Jesus Christ, we are His; that with our names, though unknown to fame, written in the Book of Life, we have grace in possession and Heaven in prospect; that after a few more brief years, pure as the angels that sing before the throne, we shall be brought with gladness into the palace of the King, to be like Christ and with Christ, seeing Him eye to eye and face to face—such hopes are powerful springs of action.

Guthrie

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.

Connect the Testaments

September 7: God Rides to Battle
Joel 1:1–2:21; Acts 7:1–53; Job 18:1–21

God is good, but in the words of C.S. Lewis, “He is not tame.” When it comes time for evil to be purged from the world, He is not timid, and when He acts, He rarely holds back. We see such a scene prophesied concerning the Day of Yahweh—the day He will return to the earth as Christ—in Joel 2:1–11.

“Blow the trumpet in Zion, and sound the alarm on my holy mountain! Let all the inhabitants of the land tremble, for the day of Yahweh is coming—it is indeed near. A day of darkness and gloom, a day of cloud and thick darkness, like the dawn spreads on the mountains, a great and strong army! There has been nothing like it from old, and after it, nothing will be again for generations to come” (Joel 2:1–2).

When God charges into battle, He seizes control of all that must be yielded so His purpose is not hindered. He then performs great and mighty deeds on behalf of His people. As Joel says, “There has been nothing like it.”

Morning and Evening

Morning, September 7Go To Evening Reading
“And when they could not come nigh unto him for the press, they uncovered the roof where he was: and when they had broken it up, they let down the bed wherein the sick of the palsy lay.”          —Mark 2:4
Faith is full of inventions. The house was full, a crowd blocked up the door, but faith found a way of getting at the Lord and placing the palsied man before him. If we cannot get sinners where Jesus is by ordinary methods we must use extraordinary ones. It seems, according to Luke 5:19, that a tiling had to be removed, which would make dust and cause a measure of danger to those below, but where the case is very urgent we must not mind running some risks and shocking some proprieties. Jesus was there to heal and therefore fall what might faith ventured all so that her poor paralysed charge might have his sins forgiven. O that we had more daring faith among us! Cannot we, dear reader, seek it this morning for ourselves and for our fellow-worke…