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Showing posts from September 12, 2016

Jericho: Canaanite Walls

Jericho: Canaanite Walls
‎ Remains of the city walls, apparently from the Canaanite period at the end of the 4th millennium B.C., at the Tel of Jericho in the north-west of today’s Arab city. Jericho is known as one of the oldest cities in the world, inhabited as far back as the Middle Stone Age—ten thousand years ago. Apparently, it was destroyed at the end of the late Canaanite period, about 1300 B.C., when the Israelites led by Joshua arrived in the country. The Book of Joshua describes how the city walls were toppled by the blowing of ram’s horns. Later Jericho became known for its dates and balsam, used to make precious spices. The Roman Emperor Augustus gave it to King Herod, who built his winter palace there.

Slaves to Righteousness

Slaves to Righteousness

Excerpt


People obviously are the slaves of the one to whom they offer themselves to obey (v. 17). Paul set forth two masters: one is your sin, and the other is obedience [to God]. There is no possibility of living without an allegiance to one or the other. “There is no absolute independence for man,” writes J. Denney; “our nature requires us to serve some master.” Unbelievers may think they are free and would have to give up that freedom should they accept Christ. Such is not the case. They are servants of sin right now. In coming to Christ they simply exchange one master for another. Servitude to sin is replaced with servitude to God. The master we obey is clear evidence of whose slaves we really are. There is no room for compromise. As Jesus taught, “No one can serve two masters” (Matt 6:24). We also are reminded of Joshua’s challenge to the Israelites at Shechem, “Choose for yourselves this day whom you will serve” (Josh 24:15).


Mounce, Robert H. Romans. Vol. 2…

Kinsman-Redeemer

Kinsman-Redeemer
‎“So Ruth went down to the threshing floor and did just as her mother-in-law had commanded her … saying to Boaz, ‘Spread your wings over your servant, for you are a redeemer.‘ ”

Man’s Delight in Nature

Man’s Delight in Nature

‎The hundred and fourth psalm sings of the splendor and beauty of nature, which is the garment of God, “Who coverest thyself with light as with a garment: who stretchest out the heavens like a curtain: ‎“Who layeth the beams of his chambers in the waters: who maketh the clouds his chariot: who walketh upon the wings of the wind:“Who maketh his angels spirits; his ministers a flaming fire:” ‎Thus all things are but the expression of God and of his love: “He watereth the hills from his chambers: the earth is satisfied with the fruit of thy works.” Many are the good gifts of the Creator, herbs, and food, “and wine that maketh glad the heart of man.” Therefore doth man rejoice. The psalm tells of him going forth among the wonders of nature, marvelling over them, recognizing their stupendous meaning, and crying out, “O Lord, how manifold are thy works! in wisdom hast, thou made them all: the earth is full of thy riches.” ‎So the hymn sweeps naturally to its closin…

Fetters, Egyptian Type

Fetters, Egyptian Type

‎The fettered prisoner in this Egyptian picture is probably Philistine or Phoenician, judging by his headdress. This is more of a symbolic representation than an actual drawing of a fettered prisoner since the fetters as shown would be incapable of restraining the man’s hands. Such a rendering would signify subjugation or defeat and was not intended to portray photographic accuracy. ‎Ps 105:16–18, Isa 28:21–22, Nah 3:10

Bow

Bow

‎When carried around, the bow was normally not drawn. Since bows were usually composite bows, i.e. they were made of different kinds of wood glued together, the two ends often curved against the normal direction. In order to use the bow as a weapon, one had to strain the ends into the opposite direction and then insert the string. Frequently a second soldier was needed for this operation. ‎2 Sam 22:35; 1 Kings 22:34; 2 Kings 13:16; 1 Chron 5:18; Ps 7:12; 11:2; 18:34; 37:14; Isa 5:28; 21:15; Zech 9:13;Wisd of Sol 5:21

The Gladness of Access

The Gladness of Access

Excerpt


Finally, the psalmist realizes that this privilege is ongoing. God’s nature doesn’t change, so his goodness will continue. His love will last forever. This invitation to acknowledge him is to all people, in every place and age.


Knowles, Andrew. The Bible Guide. 1st Augsburg books ed. Minneapolis, MN: Augsburg, 2001. Print.

Exterior of the Amphitheater, Puteoli

Exterior of the Amphitheater, Puteoli

‎A crossroad called the Via Campana leads from Puteoli to Capua, where it joins the famous Appian Way. Along this road, Paul is supposed to have walked. It is still paved with blocks of lava, sacred from the very thought that the feet of the apostle may have trodden it. On this road, about a mile from the sea is the famous amphitheater where Nero is said to have rehearsed the part he was to act on the public stage of Rome. The building is in a remarkable state of preservation. It rests upon three series of arches surrounded by an external court. The view above gives the outside of the amphitheater. Next to the sea delicate fronds of the maidenhair fern cover it, as if nature would conceal the place where crimes were committed which dishonored the spot and the nation in other years. No other people were ever so madly fascinated by the exciting scenes of the arena as were the Romans. Their motto was: “Bread and the circus.” The spell of the “stage”

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

September 12

  Behold, we go up to Jerusalem
Matt. 20:18
Never had there been such a going up to Jerusalem as that which Jesus here proposes to His disciples. He goes up voluntarily. The act was not enforced by any external compulsion. Jerusalem might at this time have been avoided. It was deliberately sought. It was a going up to a triumph to be reached through defeat, a coronation to be attained through ignominy and humiliation.

O believer, in your walk through the world today, be strengthened, be comforted, be inspired, by the spectacle of the Captain of your salvation thus going up to Jerusalem! And remember, in all those apparently downward passages of life, where sorrow, and it may be death, lie before you, that all such descents, made or endured in the Spirit of Jesus, are really up-going steps, leading you to the mount of God and the resurrection glory.

J. B. Stratton

Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic …

My Utmost for His Highest

September 12th
By spiritual confusion


Ye know not what ye ask. Matthew 20:22.

There are times in spiritual life when there is confusion, and it is no way out to say that there ought not to be confusion. It is not a question of right and wrong, but a question of God taking you by a way which in the meantime you do not understand, and it is only by going through the confusion that you will get at what God wants.
The Shrouding of His Friendship. Luke 11:5–8. Jesus gave the illustration of the man who looked as if he did not care for his friend, and He said that that is how the Heavenly Father will appear to you at times. You will think He is an unkind friend, but remember He is not; the time will come when everything will be explained. There is a cloud on the friendship of the heart, and often even love itself has to wait in pain and tears for the blessing of fuller communion. When God looks completely shrouded, will you hang on in confidence in Him?

The Shadow on His Fatherhood. Luke 1…

Connect the Testaments

September 12: Diversity in the Church
Amos 8:1–9:15; Acts 10:34–11:18; Job 21:1–16

In our comfortable and familiar church homes, we sometimes fail to see the Church as a community of ethnic and cultural diversity. When I returned from a year in South Korea, I was surprised when my family and friends made thoughtless generalizations about people I had come to know and love—some of them fellow believers in Christ. Most of these comments contradicted the multicultural picture of Christianity presented in the book of Acts.
Peter and the Jewish Christians in the early church underwent a shift in cultural perspective. When Peter came to Jerusalem after meeting with Gentiles, the Jews were shocked that he would eat with “men who were uncircumcised” (Acts 11:3). For so long, they had associated their religion with their identity as a nation and as a people group. Although they knew that God was extending this hope to the Gentiles, they needed to be reminded that Jesus was the Lord of all. Pete…

Morning and Evening

Morning, September 12Go To Evening Reading
 “God is jealous.”  —Nahum 1:2
Your Lord is very jealous of your love, O believer. Did he choose you? He cannot bear that you should choose another. Did he buy you with his own blood? He cannot endure that you should think that you are your own, or that you belong to this world. He loved you with such a love that he would not stop in heaven without you; he would sooner die than you should perish, and he cannot endure that anything should stand between your heart’s love and himself. He is very jealous of your trust. He will not permit you to trust in an arm of flesh. He cannot bear that you should hew out broken cisterns when the overflowing fountain is always free to you. When we lean upon him, he is glad, but when we transfer our dependence to another, when we rely upon our own wisdom, or the wisdom of a friend—worst of all, when we trust in any works of our own, he is displeased, and will chasten us that he may bring us to himself. He is also…