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Showing posts from September 16, 2016

Garden of Gethsemane

Garden of Gethsemane

The Wise and the Foolish

The Wise and the Foolish

Excerpt


Most of the sentences in this unit state contrasting ideas. The exceptions are vv. 10, 18, and 22 in which the first thought is expanded in the second.


Smith, James E. The Wisdom Literature and Psalms. Joplin, MO: College Press Pub. Co., 1996. Print. Old Testament Survey Series.

Elizabeth Bunyan (c. 1641–1692)

Elizabeth Bunyan (c. 1641–1692)





After the death of his first wife, Bunyan married Elizabeth in 1659. Elizabeth, around the age of 17 or 18, was much younger than the 31-year-old father of four children, John Bunyan.

Her groom was imprisoned shortly after their marriage, yet her loyalty and love for her husband shone brightly as she went before the judges of Bedford to plead Bunyan’s case in August of 1661. Earlier Elizabeth travelled to London to present a petition to the Earl of Bedford requesting her husband’s release, probably her first trip to London. But the petition was denied. In August she went before Judges Hale and Twysden who sat in the Swan Inn in Bedford in the Swan Chamber. Justice Chester and many other members of the local gentry were present to witness the bravery and tenacity of this young bride.

Yet Bunyan remained imprisoned for unlicensed preaching. Even though his time in prison could have been as short as three months if he would relinquish his desire to preach…

The Wise and the Foolish

The Wise and the Foolish

Excerpt


Most of the sentences in this unit state contrasting ideas. The exceptions are vv. 10, 18, and 22 in which the first thought is expanded in the second.


Smith, James E. The Wisdom Literature and Psalms. Joplin, MO: College Press Pub. Co., 1996. Print. Old Testament Survey Series.

What are Nations?

What are Nations?

Isaiah 55:4, 5

Excerpt


[Nations are] groups formed on the basis of political or social interests or on kinship. Generally, the word “nations” implies peoples of the world other than the Hebrews, although it can also include the Jews.


Elwell, Walter A., and Philip Wesley Comfort. Tyndale Bible dictionary2001 : 937. Print. Tyndale Reference Library.

Nahal Elot with terebinth tree

Nahal Elot with terebinth tree

Cyrus’ tomb

Cyrus’ tomb

‎The Persian king Cyrus II (559–530 BCE) was the founder of the Persian Empire. In 539 BCE, Cyrus conquered Babylon and thus became the legal successor of the Babylonian Empire. In 538 he allowed the exiled Judeans to return to Palestine. His tomb lies in the ruins of Parargadae in Iran. ‎2 Chron 36:22–23; Ezra 1:1–2, 1:7–8; 3:7; 4:3, 4:5; 5:13–14, 5:17; 6:3, 6:14; Isa 44:28; 45:1; Dan 1:21; 6:28; 10:1;Bel 1–2

What Happened “before the World Was”

What Happened “before the World Was”

Excerpt


‎As we have seen, the glory of God is the sum total of all that He is, the expression of His character. It is the manifestation of all that He is in Himself, His marvelous attributes. We have a difficult time grasping the concept of God’s glory because there is nothing like it on earth. While it is true that "The heavens are telling of the glory of God" (Psalm 19:1), it is also true that sin has put God’s creation into bondage and robbed God of glory (Romans 8:18-25). Psalm 19 makes special mention of the sun as an illustration of God’s glory, and perhaps that is the closest we can come to finding a picture. Just as the rays of the sun cannot be separated from the sun itself, so Jesus Christ cannot be separated from God, because He is God.

‎The amazing thing is this: Those who have trusted Jesus Christ as their Savior possess this glory now (John 17:22) and will see God’s glory and share it in heaven one day (John 17:24). …


Wiersbe, W…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

September 15

  The Son of man came not to be ministered unto, but to minister, and to give his life a ransom for many
Matt. 20:28
We are so to surrender ourselves to Christ that this great purpose of His coming shall claim and possess the whole life. We are to live, like God, to bless others. This is His will, His purpose concerning us. This is what His power waits to do for us. And this too is the claim of His great love upon us.

Do not sigh a poor assent to the truth of it, and then pass by neglectfully on the other side. Do not think about it and pray about it without even a passing hope that the prayer will be answered. Do not gather yourself up in great resolutions to be good and useful. Kneel in sight of the Crucified. In the cross of Christ spell out His great purpose and yearning love to men. Let the heart feel all the might of the appeal that comes to us from those torn hands and feet and bleeding brow, from all the dreadful shame and agony of our dear Lord. And, bought and bo…

My Utmost for His Highest

September 16th
The divine region of religion


But thou, when thou prayest, enter into thy closet, and when thou hast shut thy door, pray to thy Father which is in secret. Matthew 6:6.

The main idea in the region of religion is—Your eyes upon God, not on men. Do not have as your motive the desire to be known as a praying man. Get an inner chamber in which to pray where no one knows you are praying, shut the door and talk to God in secret. Have no other motive than to know your Father in heaven. It is impossible to conduct your life as a disciple without definite times of secret prayer:

“But when ye pray, use not vain repetitions.…” (v. 7). God is never impressed by our earnestness. He does not hear us because we are in earnest, but only on the ground of Redemption. Prayer is not simply getting things from God, that is an initial form of prayer; prayer is getting into perfect communion with God. If the Son of God is formed in us by regeneration, He will press forward in front of our comm…

Connect the Testaments

September 16: Freedom and Response
Micah 4:1–6:16; Acts 14:8–15:21; Job 23:1–17

Freedom from sin gives us the power to love. But freedom from poverty or oppression or guilt sometimes makes us complacent. We forget our inclination to wander away from God’s will and pursue our own, and we overlook that God will eventually call us to account. Although Micah prophesied during a time of prosperity in Israel, it was also a time of spiritual deficiency. The powerful were oppressing the weak (Mic 2:1–2; 3:2–3) politically and economically.

Micah holds Israel to account in this passage. The prophet paints a courtroom scene with God judging His people for their unfaithfulness: “He has told you, O mortal, what is good, and what does Yahweh ask from you but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God?” (Mic 6:8).

The mountains and the hills listen as Yahweh accuses Israel, and the evidence He presents is startling. God has been active and present in His people’s lives, tu…

Morning and Evening

Morning, September 15Go To Evening Reading
“He shall not be afraid of evil tidings.” —Psalm 112:7
Christian, you ought not to dread the arrival of evil tidings; because if you are distressed by them, what do you more than other men? Other men have not your God to fly to; they have never proved his faithfulness as you have done, and it is no wonder if they are bowed down with alarm and cowed with fear: but you profess to be of another spirit; you have been begotten again unto a lively hope, and your heart lives in heaven and not on earthly things; now, if you are seen to be distracted as other men, what is the value of that grace which you profess to have received? Where is the dignity of that new nature which you claim to possess?

Again, if you should be filled with alarm, as others are, you would, doubtless, be led into the sins so common to others under trying circumstances. The ungodly, when they are overtaken by evil tidings, rebel against God; they murmur, and think that God deals …