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Be Aware of the Dynamics of Group Communication

Be Aware of the Dynamics of Group Communication

Excerpt
‎Understanding the dynamics of communication in groups and learning to orchestrate and affect those dynamics are tremendous assets for a leader. Being able to recognize the signs that indicate that communication is breaking down and to know how to intervene effectively when the group climate begins to sour, can save a meeting, a program, and perhaps future relationships among participants.
‎Social scientists have observed that people usually express ideas and information through their words, but their feelings are expressed through subtle body language, tone of voice, facial expression, and so on. The group leader does well to listen with the eyes as well as the ears, to both the person who is talking and to those who are reacting in one way or another. These group dynamics are especially relevant for anyone who is conducting a meeting. … More
Vassallo, Wanda. Church Communications Handbook: A Complete Guide to Developing a Strategy, Using Technology, Writing Effectively, Reaching the Unchurched. Grand Rapids, MI: Kregel Resources, 1998. Print.
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