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Connect the Testaments

May 29: Blessed Sticky Notes
1 Chronicles 24:1–25:31; 2 Timothy 3:10–17; Psalm 89:1–22
A great friend of mine keeps sticky notes with prayer requests on a bathroom mirror. They serve as a reminder of the needs of others. This friend never seems to have an “off day” or feel sad about their particular situation. Maybe these notes play a part in that attitude, but that’s not why I find the practice remarkable. What astounds me is the effort to pray for others constantly. This person reminds me of God’s faithfulness in my life whenever things get tough, for me or others, and I’m grateful my name is on one of those notes. Otherwise, I think I would have lost my way several times already.
First Chronicles presents story after story of God’s faithfulness. The book records how God kept His people alive in the face of powerful adversaries, and it tells how God led David in his great appointment as king. Paul’s journey has several parallels with David’s. Just as the chronicler watches David’s narrative, as well as that of Israel in general (e.g., 1 Chr 24), Timothy watches Paul and the Christian church (2 Tim 3:10–17). Paul recounts to Timothy, “But you have faithfully followed my teaching, way of life, purpose, faith, patience, love, endurance, persecutions, and sufferings that happened to me in Antioch, in Iconium, and in Lystra, what sort of persecutions I endured, and the Lord delivered me from all of them” (2 Tim 3:10–11). Timothy is more than a colleague; he is a true friend.
What a joy it is to have someone in your life who watches “your story.” Think how our lives might be different if we had more friends who faithfully prayed for us and we faithfully prayed for them. Following God is not just a matter of listening to His guidance; it’s also being aware of how His faithfulness is playing out in the lives of those around us.
Who can you be praying for? How can you commit to being a blessing to them? How can you regularly remind yourself to do so?
John D. Barry


 Barry, John D., and Rebecca Kruyswijk. Connect the Testaments: A One-Year Daily Devotional with Bible Reading Plan. Bellingham, WA: Lexham Press, 2012. Print.

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