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KJV Commentary, The International Sunday school Lesson, Outline

July 23
Lesson 8 (KJV)
Ezekiel
Devotional Reading: Ezekiel 17:22–24
Background Scripture: Ezekiel 1–3


Ezekiel 3:1–11
1 Moreover, he said unto me, Son of man, eat that thou findest; eat this roll, and go speak unto the house of Israel.
2 So I opened my mouth, and he caused me to eat that roll.
3 And he said unto me, Son of man, cause thy belly to eat, and fill thy bowels with this roll that I give thee. Then did I eat it; and it was in my mouth as honey for sweetness.
4 And he said unto me, Son of man, go, get thee unto the house of Israel, and speak with my words unto them.
5 For thou, art not sent to a people of a strange speech and of [a] hard language, but to the house of Israel;
6 Not [too] many people of a strange speech and of an hard language, whose words thou canst not understand. Surely, had I sent thee to them, they would have hearkened unto thee.
7 But the house of Israel will not hearken unto thee; for they will not hearken unto me: for all the house of Israel are impudent and hardhearted.
8 Behold, I have made thy face strong against their faces, and thy forehead strong against their foreheads.
9 As an adamant harder than flint have I made thy forehead: fear them not, neither be dismayed at their looks, though they be a rebellious house.
10 Moreover, he said unto me, Son of man, all my words that I shall speak unto thee receive in thine heart, and hear with thine ears.
11 And go, get thee to them of the captivity, unto the children of thy people, and speak unto them, and tell them, Thus saith the Lord God; whether they will hear, or whether they will forbear.

Photo: dionisvero / iStock / Thinkstock
Key Verses
Moreover, he said unto me, Son of man, all my words that I shall speak unto thee receive in thine heart, and hear with thine ears. And go, get thee to them of the captivity, unto the children of thy people, and speak unto them, and tell them, Thus saith the Lord God; whether they will hear, or whether they will forbear.
Ezekiel 3:10, 11
God’s Urgent Call
Unit 2: Calling of Prophets
Lessons 5–9
Lesson Aims
After participating in this lesson, each learner will be able to:
1. Describe the context of Ezekiel’s call.
2. Contrast the difficulty of correcting those who don’t know better with the problem of correcting those who should and/or do know better.
3. Identify situations in modern churches about which one should be “hard headed.”
Lesson Outline
Introduction
A. Gourmet or Garbage?
B. Lesson Background
I. Tasted Words (Ezekiel 3:1–4)
A. Command to Eat, Part 1 (vv. 1, 2)
B. Command to Eat, Part 2 (vv. 3, 4)
II. Tested People (Ezekiel 3:5–7)
A. Same Language (vv. 5, 6)
B. Same Result (v. 7)
Wavelength
III. Toughened Prophet (Ezekiel 3:8–11)
A. Unyielding Messenger (vv. 8, 9)
Stubbornness as a Go(o)d Thing
B. Unyielding Message (vv. 10, 11)
Conclusion
A. Balancing Act
B. Prayer
C. Thought to Remember
HOW TO SAY IT
Babylon

Bab-uh-lun.

Babylonians

Bab-ih-low-nee-unz.

casa marzu

caw-zoo marh-zoo.

Chebar

Kee-bar.

escamoles

ess-kuh-mow-less.

Ezekiel

Ee-zeek-ee-ul or Ee-zeek-yul.

formaggio marcio

fohr-mod-djoh mar-choh.

kopi luwak

co-pea lu-wah.

krovat

craw-vawht.

messianic

mess-ee-an-ick.

Moab

Mo-ab.

Nebuchadnezzar

Neb-yuh-kud-nez-er.

Nineveh

Nin-uh-vuh.

Solomon

Sol-o-mun.


Visual for Lesson 8. Point to this visual as you ask, “In what ways does resistance to the Word of God manifest itself today? How should we respond?”

What Do You Think?
What can we expect to experience when we taste God’s Word? What is signified if we don’t experience such things?
Talking Points for Your Discussion
Regarding our state of mind (Psalm 34:8)
Regarding our commitment (Hebrews 6:4–6)
Regarding our maturity (1 Peter 2:1–3)
Other

What Do You Think?
What does the prophet’s “go” mandate in Ezekiel 3:1, 4, 11 have to say, if anything, to Christians pondering how best to implement the “go” mandate in Matthew 28:19, 20?
Talking Points for Your Discussion
Regarding the mandates’ similarities
Regarding the mandates’ distinctives


What Do You Think?
What are some ways for Christians to prepare themselves for negative reactions that may come when sin is confronted within a church?
Talking Points for Your Discussion
For reactions that hide behind Matthew 7:1
For reactions that hide behind John 8:7
For reactions that hide behind cultural concepts of “privacy”
Other

What Do You Think?
What forms should stubbornness on our part take and not take in spreading the gospel? Why?
Talking Points for Your Discussion
To those of our own language and culture
To those of our own language but different culture
To those who differ in both language and culture

What Do You Think?
How do we know whether or not to move on when the gospel is stubbornly resisted?
Talking Points for Your Discussion
Considering examples of staying put (Acts 5:17–21; 8:1b—regarding the apostles; etc.)
Considering examples of moving on (Luke 9:5; Acts 9:23–25; 17:32, 33; etc.)
Considering examples where both occur in different senses (Acts 18:1–11; 19:1–10; etc.)


























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