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Showing posts from January 23, 2017

The Preacher and Preparation: Selection

The Preacher and Preparation: SelectionExcerpt ‎How we choose what to preach—how we select texts and topics—is critical for each message preached, as well as the whole character and content of a preaching ministry. ‎What begins as a simple question, What do I preach next Sunday? (for instance), actually forces the preacher to consider what preaching itself is supposed to be and do, what the content of preaching needs to be on any given occasion, how the Holy Spirit works, and how God sovereignly plans and orchestrates situations. Let it be said that ultimately there is a majestic mystery intrinsic to this whole process. Although we will seek to bring biblical truth to bear on these matters, that in no way means that the question above can be answered simply, unless you say, “Preach what God has told you to preach.” … More Olford, Stephen F., and David L. Olford. Anointed Expository Preaching. Nashville, TN: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1998. Print.

Good Masters

Good MastersExcerpt The particular Greek word translated “servants” indicates that these were household slaves. They were Christian slaves serving for the most part in the homes of pagan masters. The fact that Peter singles them out for special admonitions indicates that slaves, as a class, formed a large part of the early Christian community. The slaves are exhorted to put themselves in subjection to their absolute lords and masters. They are to do this to the good and gentle ones. Some of these pagan masters had what the poet calls “the milk of human kindness.” They were good to their slaves. The Greek word translated “good,” refers to inner intrinsic goodness. They were good at heart. The word “gentle” in the Greek refers to that disposition which is mild, yielding, indulgent. It is derived from a Greek word meaning, “not being unduly rigorous.” More Wuest, Kenne

Cain’s Anger

Cain’s Anger.Excerpt Cain was so angry he would not be talked out of his sin—even by God. Eve, however, had to be talked into her sin by Satan; but Cain “belonged to the evil one” (1 John 3:12). It is as if he could not wait to destroy his brother—a natural man’s solution to his own failure. More Ross, Allen P. “Genesis.” The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures. Ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck. Vol. 1. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985. 34. Print.

Bind and Write Them

Bind and Write ThemProverbs 3:3 Excerpt The command to “bind them around your neck, write them on the tablet of your heart” further indicates that the character of the student is in view rather than just his behavior. Some have suggested that the binding of love to the neck means that it is here a kind of necklace that beautifies the individual. But the parallel between “neck” and “heart” here implies that fidelity is more than an ornament to the neck. The neck houses the throat which, in Hebrew anthropology, is the very life of the person. Love and faithfulness are to become part of the student’s heart and life.46 The influence of Deuteronomy here is evident.47 More Garrett, Duane A. Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Song of Songs. Vol. 14. Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1993. Print. The New American Commentary.

Barry, John D., and Rebecca Kruyswijk. Connect the Testaments

January 23: Pride in Disguise Genesis 37; Matthew 26:57–27:31; Ecclesiastes 9:1–6 Sometimes recognizing our sin for what it is can throw us into deep shame. In Matthew, we find that two of Jesus’ disciples experience this moment of remorse—Judas after he betrays Jesus, and Peter when he denies Jesus. From their responses, we learn what true repentance looks like. Judas is remorseful when he realizes the enormity of his betrayal. But he doesn’t move from remorse to repentance. He tries to absolve his guilt by returning the payment he received for betraying Jesus—an attempt to buy back his innocence. And when the “blood money” is refused and he is unable to eliminate the guilt, Judas hangs himself (Matt 27:5). Peter, the disciple with an impulsive, childlike loyalty to Jesus, denies his Lord when questioned by a mere servant girl. When Peter remembers Jesus’ prediction, he leaves, “weeping bitterly.” However, the Gospel of John tells us that Peter glorified God in his death (John 21:15–19). …

Spurgeon, Charles H. Morning and Evening

Morning, January 23                   Go To Evening Reading
“I have exalted one chosen out of the people.” —Psalm 89:19
Why was Christ chosen out of the people? Speak, my heart, for heart-thoughts are best. Was it not that he might be able to be our brother, in the blest tie of kindred blood? Oh, what relationship there is between Christ and the believer! The believer can say, “I have a Brother in heaven; I may be poor, but I have a Brother who is rich, and is a King, and will he suffer me to want while he is on his throne? Oh, no! He loves me; he is my Brother.” Believer, wear this blessed thought, like a necklace of diamonds, around the neck of thy memory; put it, as a golden ring, on the finger of recollection, and use it as the King’s own seal, stamping the petitions of thy faith with confidence of success. He is a brother born for adversity, treat him as such.
Christ was also chosen out of the people that he might know our wants and sympathize with us. “He was tempted in all points l…

Chambers, Oswald. My Utmost for His Highest

January 23rd Transformed by insight We all, with open face, beholding as in a glass the glory of the Lord, are changed into the same image. 2 Cor. 3:18. The outstanding characteristic of a Christian is this unveiled frankness before God so that the life becomes a mirror for other lives. By being filled with the Spirit we are transformed, and by beholding we become mirrors. You always know when a man has been beholding the glory of the Lord, you feel in your inner spirit that he is the mirror of the Lord’s own character. Beware of anything which would sully that mirror in you; it is nearly always a good thing, the good that is not the best. The golden rule for your life and mine is this concentrated keeping of the life open towards God. Let everything else—work, clothes, food, everything on earth—go by the board, saving that one thing. The rush of other things always tends to obscure this concentration on God. We have to maintain ourselves in the place of beholding, keeping the life absolu…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

January 23 Under his shadow Song of Sol. 2:3 I seem to see four pictures suggested by that: under the shadow of a rock in a weary plain; under the shadow of a tree; closer still, under the shadow of His wing; nearest and closest, in the shadow of His hand. Surely that hand must be the pierced hand, that may oftentimes press us sorely, and yet evermore encircling, upholding and shadowing! Frances Ridley Havergal

 Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.