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Showing posts from January 30, 2017

Recall the Former Days

Recall the Former DaysExcerpt In the early days of the gospel there was a very hot persecution raised up against the professors of the Christian religion, and the believing Hebrews had their share of it: he would have them to remember, (1.) When they had suffered: In former days, afterthey were illuminated; that is, as soon as God had breathed life into their souls, and caused divine light to spring up in their minds, and taken them into his favour and covenant; then earth and hell combined all their force against them. Here observe, A natural state is a dark state, and those who continue in that state meet with no disturbance from Satan and the world; but a state of grace is a state of light, and therefore the powers of darkness will violently oppose it. Those who will live godly in Christ Jesus must suffer persecution. More Henry, Matthew. Matthew Henry’s Commentary on the Whole Bible: Complete and Unabridged in One Volume. Peabody: Hendrickson, 1994. Print.

Not Be Pleased with Burnt Offerings

Not Be Pleased with Burnt OfferingsExcerpt The prayer ends with a recognition of the kind of sacrifice that God approves of; God does not want dead animals burned on the altar or other ritual sacrifices. In a typical way of speaking, the psalmist is not (as it might appear) saying that God wants all sacrifices to cease; he is saying that God prefers the proper attitude which the offering of sacrifices should express andrepresent (see similar sentiments in 50.8–9). More Bratcher, Robert G., and William David Reyburn. A Translator’s Handbook on the Book of Psalms. New York: United Bible Societies, 1991. Print. UBS Handbook Series.

Uzziah

UzziahExcerpt Judah’s king from around 792 to 740 bc (cf. 2 Kgs 14:21–2215:1–72 Chr 26:1–23), the son of King Amaziah and Jecoliah of Jerusalem. Uzziah is the name he is called in Chronicles, but in Kings he is known as Azariah. Azariah means “the Lord has helped”; the meaning of Uzziah is “my strength is the Lord.” Azariah may have been his given name and Uzziah a throne name taken upon his accession. He came to the throne at the age of 16, after the death of his father, who was assassinated in Lachish as a result of a conspiracy arising from his apostasy. Uzziah was a capable, energetic, and well-organized person, with many diverse interests. The Lord blessed him in all of his undertakings, so that he prospered. He is characterized as one who “did what was right in the eyes of the Lord” (2 Kgs 15:32 Chr 26:4). He determined to seek God and went to Zechariah (not the postexilic prophet) for spiritual instruction. Consequently, “as long as he sought the Lord, God made him prosper…

Abide

AbideJohn 15:4–79–1016 Excerpt R. Bultmann (John [Eng. tr., 1971] 535n.1) correctly emphasizes two aspects of μένω ἐν: In reference to humankind “abide in” designates “loyalty”; in reference to the revealer or God it designates “the eternal validity of the divine act of salvation for the believer.” More Balz, Horst Robert, and Gerhard Schneider. Exegetical dictionary of the New Testament 1990– : 408. Print.

Connect the Testaments

January 30: Difficult Definitions Genesis 47–48; Hebrews 11; Ecclesiastes 12:1–8 As an editor, I love definitions. The field of lexicography can be complex, but when a definition is finally solidified, there’s comfort to be found. It becomes something stable. This is also the reason I love the book of Hebrews: the author is keen on definitions, clarifying terminology, and using analogies to prove his points. “Now faith is the realization of what is hoped for, the proof of things not seen” (Heb 11:1). In this succinct definition, I have perspective on the essence of faith. There is no room for doubt or error. The hope referred to is Jesus. And the proof is in an assurance that even though we cannot see Him, we have confidence in His work both presently and in the future. The author goes on to say, “For by this [faith] the people of old were approved [by God]. By faith we understand the worlds were created by the word of God, in order that what is seen did not come into existence from what …

Spurgeon, Charles H. Morning and Evening

Morning, January 30                   Go To Evening Reading
“When thou hearest the sound of a going in the tops of the mulberry trees, then thou shalt bestir thyself.” —2 Samuel 5:24
The members of Christ’s Church should be very prayerful, always seeking the unction of the Holy One to rest upon their hearts, that the kingdom of Christ may come, and that his “will be done on earth, even as it is in heaven;” but there are times when God seems especially to favour Zion, such seasons ought to be to them like “the sound of a going in the tops of the mulberry trees.” We ought then to be doubly prayerful, doubly earnest, wrestling more at the throne than we have been wont to do. Action should then be prompt and vigorous. The tide is flowing—now let us pull manfully for the shore. O for Pentecostal outpourings and Pentecostal labours. Christian, in yourself there are times “when thou hearest the sound of a going in the tops of the mulberry trees.” You have a peculiar power in prayer; the Spirit …

My Utmost for His Highest

January 30th The dilemma of obedience And Samuel feared to shew Eli the vision.1 Samuel 3:15. God seldom speaks to us in startling ways, but in ways that are easy to misunderstand, and we say, ‘I wonder if that is God’s voice?’ Isaiah said that the Lord spake to him “with a strong hand,” that is, by the pressure of circumstances. Nothing touches our lives but it is God Himself speaking. Do we discern His hand or only mere occurrence? Get into the habit of saying, “Speak, Lord,” and life will become a romance. Every time circumstances press, say, “Speak, Lord”; make time to listen. Chastening is more than a means of discipline, it is meant to get me to the place of saying, “Speak, Lord.” Recall the time when God did speak to you. Have you forgotten what He said? Was it Luke 11:13, or was it 1 Thess. 5:23? As we listen, our ear gets acute, and, like Jesus, we shall hear God all the time. Shall I tell my ‘Eli’ what God has shown to me? That is where the dilemma of obedience comes in. We disob…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

January 30 Therefore we are buried with him by baptism into death; that like as Christ was raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life Rom. 6:4 That is the life we are called upon to live, and that is the life it is our privilege to lead; for God never gives us a call without its being a privilege, and He never gives us the privilege to come up higher without stretching out to us His hand to lift us up. Come up higher and higher into the realities and glories of the resurrection life, knowing that your life is hid with Christ in God. Shake yourself loose of every encumbrance, turn your back on every defilement, give yourself over like clay to the hands of the potter, that He may stamp upon you the fullness of His own resurrection glory, that you, beholding as in a mirror the glory of the Lord, may be changed from glory to glory as by the Spirit of the Lord. W. Hay Aitken

 Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Qui…