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Showing posts from February 1, 2017

Do Not Turn Away from God

Do Not Turn Away from GodHebrews 3:12–13 Excerpt In verses 12–13, this example is now applied to all who read Hebrews. The writer’s argument is: If unbelief kept Israelites out of the land of Canaan (a picture of God’s rest), how much more serious is it today to give way to unbelief and thus miss the greater rest (the rest of justification and salvation). The warning is addressed to the whole assembly (See to it, brothers, … encourage one another daily). These phrases recognize the individual responsibility to act (that none of you has a sinful, unbelieving heart, … none of you may be hardened by sin’s deceitfulness) and describe accurately the terrible result of sin’s hardening (turns away from the living God). More Stedman, Ray C. Hebrews. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1992. Print. The IVP New Testament Commentary Series.

The House of God

The House of GodExcerpt All that the writer has said about the Melchizedek priesthood of Jesus is recalled here. Believers have not only a confident spirit but also a competent advocate. He is continually available, completely aware of our present situation, and vitally involved with us in working all things together for good. His great concern is the welfare of each member of the household of God, and “we are his house,” as the writer has told us unmistakably in 3:6More Stedman, Ray C. Hebrews. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1992. Print. The IVP New Testament Commentary Series.

Faith and Victory

Faith and VictoryExcerpt Living in obedience to God is the life of faith — a victory over the ways and wiles of the world. Our faith is in the victory of our Saviour, Jesus Christ, over the power of sin and death. More Knowles, Andrew. The Bible Guide. 1st Augsburg books ed. Minneapolis, MN: Augsburg, 2001. Print.

Not Be Pleased with Burnt Offerings

Not Be Pleased with Burnt OfferingsExcerpt The prayer ends with a recognition of the kind of sacrifice that God approves of; God does not want dead animals burned on the altar or other ritual sacrifices. In a typical way of speaking, the psalmist is not (as it might appear) saying that God wants all sacrifices to cease; he is saying that God prefers the proper attitude which the offering of sacrifices should express and represent (see similar sentiments in 50.8–9). More Bratcher, Robert G., and William David Reyburn. A Translator’s Handbook on the Book of Psalms. New York: United Bible Societies, 1991. Print. UBS Handbook Series.

Connect the Testaments

February 1: God’s Ideas: More than Good Exodus 1–3; John 1:1–18; Song of Solomon 1:1–4 It’s exciting to see ideas take shape and then become reality. Even more exciting, though, is when God’s ideas take form. The Bible shows us these events repeatedly. As the reader, we’re given glimpses into what God is really doing—events the characters are unaware of. Or we have a hint all along that God is up to something unexpected, and that He will make good out of the evil that’s happening. The story of Moses is like this. God’s people are terribly oppressed, but they are many (Exod 1). And we all know there is power in numbers. When baby Moses comes along, we’re ready for something amazing to happen. It will be from this unassuming moment that God will do the least expected (Exod 2:1–10): He will help those on the underside of power. Our suspicion is confirmed when Moses is willing to kill for justice (Exod 2:11–12). Moses flees, and then God hears Israel’s complaints about the pain they’re endur…

Spurgeon, Charles H. Morning and Evening

Morning, February 1                   Go To Evening Reading
“They shall sing in the ways of the Lord.” —Psalm 138:5
The time when Christians begin to sing in the ways of the Lord is when they first lose their burden at the foot of the Cross. Not even the songs of the angels seem so sweet as the first song of rapture which gushes from the inmost soul of the forgiven child of God. You know how John Bunyan describes it. He says when poor Pilgrim lost his burden at the Cross, he gave three great leaps, and went on his way singing—
“Blest Cross! blest Sepulchre! blest rather be The Man that there was put to shame for me!”
Believer, do you recollect the day when your fetters fell off? Do you remember the place when Jesus met you, and said, “I have loved thee with an everlasting love; I have blotted out as a cloud thy transgressions, and as a thick cloud thy sins; they shall not be mentioned against thee any more for ever.” Oh! what a sweet season is that when Jesus takes away the pain of sin. Whe…

My Utmost for His Highest

February 1st The call of God For Christ sent me not to baptize, but to preach the gospel.1 Cor. 1:17. Paul states here that the call of God is to preach the gospel; but remember what Paul means by “the gospel” viz., the reality of Redemption in our Lord Jesus Christ. We are apt to make sanctification the end-all of our preaching. Paul alludes to personal experience by way of illustration, never as the end of the matter. We are nowhere commissioned to preach salvation or sanctification; we are commissioned to lift up Jesus Christ (John 12:32). It is a travesty to say that Jesus Christ travailed in Redemption to make me a saint. Jesus Christ travailed in Redemption to redeem the whole world, and place it unimpaired and rehabilitated before the throne of God. The fact that Redemption can be experienced by us is an illustration of the power of the reality of Redemption, but that is not the end of Redemption. If God were human, how sick to the heart and weary He would be of the constant reque…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

February 1 Continue in prayer Col. 4:2 Dost thou want nothing? Then I fear thou dost not know thy poverty. Hast thou no mercy to ask of God? Then may the Lord’s mercy show thee thy misery. A prayerless soul is a Christless soul. Prayer is the lisping of the believing infant, the shout of the fighting believer, the requiem of the dying saint falling asleep in Jesus. Spurgeon

 Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.