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Showing posts from February 8, 2017

I and the Father are One

I and the Father are OneJohn 10:30 Excerpt The statement in 10:30 that “I and the Father are one” has been an important battleground of theology.282 The first matter to note is that the word “one” here is neuter (hen) and not masculine (heis), so the text is not arguing for a oneness of personalities or personae (to use the Latin concept) but rather something akin to a oneness of purpose and will. The point being made then is that protecting the sheep (Christians) here is a joint task of the Father and the Son. Having made this point, however, it must be stated immediately that there is no intention here of speaking about two separate gods or of asserting the Arian denial of Jesus as God. Such ideas find no support in Johannine Christology. The clear thesis throughout the Gospel from the Prologue (in which the Word is declared to be God, 1:1) to Thomas’s climactic confession (“My Lord and my God!” 20:28) is that Jesus is God.283 No other affirmation would be adequate for John. Moreover…

Paul Quotes Isaiah

Paul Quotes IsaiahEphesians 2:17 Excerpt Paul used Isaiah 57:19 (quoted in 2:17) and Psalm 118:22 or Isaiah 28:16 (alluded to in 2:20) to show how Christ, as the cornerstone, brought those who were near and far together into one holy temple in the Spirit. The words “But now” (2:13) introduce a contrast with the Gentile’s previous position (2:11–12). Christ brought peace (2:14) by joining the two groups into one. The “wall” (2:14) is an allusion to the wall on the temple grounds that separated the court of the Gentiles from the court that only Jews could enter. The death penalty would be inflicted if a Gentile passed that barrier. That wall of hostility had been broken down in Christ. More Hughes, Robert B., and J. Carl Laney. Tyndale Concise Bible Commentary. Wheaton, IL: Tyndale House Publishers, 2001. Print. The Tyndale Reference Library.

Connect the Testaments

February 8: It’s Standing between You and God Exodus 19–20; John 4:1–26; Song of Solomon 2:14–17 There is nothing more frustrating than being ordered around. Few people take to a drill sergeant. Although we like to cite the Ten Commandments (Exod 20) because they’re the norm, the rebellious part of our spirits has trouble with them. If we’re honest with ourselves and take them the way Jesus did (Matt 5–7), we’re confronted with the fact that we’ve all violated them at some point or another. (I don’t know anyone who has always honored their father and mother.) If everyone lived by the Ten Commandments, the world would be a peaceful place. But again, we’re rebellious. The Ten Commandments reveal something about us: we’re weaker than we would like to believe. They also reveal something about our place before God: it’s not good—not without Jesus’ saving act that redeems us from our sins. In John 4:1–26, we see Jesus confront a woman at a well who, like us, is a commandment-breaker. And becaus…

Morning and Evening

Morning, February 8Go To Evening Reading
“Thou shalt call his name Jesus.” —Matthew 1:21
When a person is dear, everything connected with him becomes dear for his sake. Thus, so precious is the person of the Lord Jesus in the estimation of all true believers, that everything about him they consider to be inestimable beyond all price. “All thy garments smell of myrrh, and aloes, and cassia,” said David, as if the very vestments of the Saviour were so sweetened by his person that he could not but love them. Certain it is, that there is not a spot where that hallowed foot hath trodden—there is not a word which those blessed lips have uttered—nor a thought which his loving Word has revealed—which is not to us precious beyond all price. And this is true of the names of Christ—they are all sweet in the believer’s ear. Whether he be called the Husband of the Church, her Bridegroom, her Friend; whether he be styled the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world—the King, the Prophet, or the Pri…

Chambers, Oswald. My Utmost for His Highest

February 8th Instantaneous and insistent sanctification And the very God of peace sanctify you wholly.1 Thess. 5:23–24. When we pray to be sanctified, are we prepared to face the standard of these verses? We take the term sanctification much too lightly. Are we prepared for what sanctification will cost? It will cost an intense narrowing of all our interests on earth and an immense broadening of all our interests in God. Sanctification means intense concentration on God’s point of view. It means every power of the body, soul and spirit chained and kept for God’s purpose only. Are we prepared for God to do in us all that He separated us for? And then after His work is done in us, are we prepared to separate ourselves to God even as Jesus did? “For their sakes I sanctify Myself.” The reason some of us have not entered into the experience of sanctification is that we have not realized the meaning of sanctification from God’s standpoint. Sanctification means being made one with Jesus so that…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

February 8 Get thee out of thy country, and from thy kindred, and from thy father’s house.… Abraham … was gathered to his people Gen 12:1; Gen. 25:8 After all communion we dwell as upon islands, dotted over a great archipelago, each upon his little rock with the sea dashing between us; but the time comes when, if our hearts are set upon that great Lord whose presence makes us one, there shall be no more sea and all the isolated rocks shall be parts of a great continent.… If we cultivate that sense of detachment from the present and of having our true affinities in the unseen, if we dwell here as strangers because our citizenship is in heaven, then death will not drag us away from our associates nor hunt us into a lonely land, but will bring us where closer bonds shall knit the “sweet societies” together, and the sheep shall couch close by one another because all gathered round the one Shepherd. Then many a tie shall be re-woven, and the solitary wanderer meet again the dear ones whom he …