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Showing posts from February 9, 2017

The Righteousness of God

The Righteousness of GodExcerpt Paul said God’s righteousness is (being) revealed (ἀποκαλύπτεται, present tense). Here he says, God’s righteousness has been manifested (πεφανέρωται, perfect tense). There is little difference. The present tense emphasizes the continuation of the process in the proclamation of the Gospel, the perfect the fact that the process has a beginning. It will shortly appear that this beginning is to be found in the death of Jesus. This manifestation of righteousness takes place apart from the law; not because the righteousness of God could not be manifested through the law, but because the righteousness which, when manifested through the law, could only lead to wrath, since the law was abused (cf. 4:15), has now been manifested in a different way so as to lead to justification. It is because the law has been defined out of the manifestation and faith (v.22) defined in, that in this paragraph (contrast 1:18) we hear nothing of wrath. More Barrett, C. K. The Epistle …

Beyond Bible Study

Beyond Bible StudyExcerpt Never have there been so many tools available for serious Bible study, and we are grateful for them. However, the Word of God is unlike any other book: we must be on good terms with the Author if we are to learn from what He has written. Our relationship to the Lord is determined by our relationship to His will, and that is determined by how we relate to His Word. Too many believers have only academic head knowledge of the Word, but they do not know how to put this knowledge into practice in the decisions of daily life. What we all need is a heart knowledge of the Word, and this means being taught by God (v. 102). Here are the conditions we must meet. More Wiersbe, Warren W. Be Exultant. 1st ed. Colorado Springs, CO: Cook Communications Ministries, 2004. Print. “Be” Commentary Series.

God Appears to Moses

God Appears to MosesExodus 3:2–5 Excerpt Here, at Horeb, God appeared to Moses as the Angel of the Lord (vid., p. 118f.) “in a flame of fire out of the midst of the thorn-bush” (סְנֶה, βάτος, rubus), which burned in the fire and was not consumed. אֻכָּל, in combination with אֵינֶנּוּ, must be a participle for מְאֻכָּל. When Moses turned aside from the road or spot where he was standing, “to look at this great sight” (מַרְאֶה), i.e., the miraculous vision of the bush that was burning and yet not burned up, Jehovah called to him out of the midst of the thorn-bush, “Moses, Moses (the reduplication as in Gen. 22:11), draw not nigh hither: put off thy shoes from off thy feet, for the place whereon thou standest is holy ground”(אֲדָמָה). More Keil, Carl Friedrich, and Franz Delitzsch. Commentary on the Old Testament. Vol. 1. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 1996. Print.

The Temptation of Jesus

The Temptation of JesusExcerpt We may be certain that the story was also told for its exemplary features in order to encourage Christians facing temptation and to indicate to them how to recognize and overcome it. They are to note that in each case Jesus replies to temptation with a quotation from Scripture, thereby indicating that the life of the man of God must follow certain clear principles expressive of God’s will which have already been revealed in the OT. It has been argued that this reduces the story to the level of a rabbinic Streitgespräch in which Jesus overcomes the devil by a superior knowledge of Scripture (cf. Bultmann, 271–275), but the point is rather that Jesus is obedient to God’s will in Scripture (H. Seesemann, TDNT VI, 23-36, especially 34-36 and n. 68), and not that he wins by superior dialectical skill. More Marshall, I. Howard. The Gospel of Luke: A Commentary on the Greek Text. Exeter: Paternoster Press, 1978. Print. New International Greek Testament Commentary…

Connect the Testaments

February 9: Speaking Up Exodus 21:1–23:33; John 4:27–42; Song of Solomon 3:1–2 Because we convince ourselves that people won’t accept our testimony about God’s work in our lives, we’re not usually ready to share it. We might prejudge their reactions or simply lack confidence. Soon, staying silent becomes a way of life. We become accustomed to the monotony and forget our calling in the world. But we’re called to action. Our words have power, and not because of our own storytelling talent or our ability to tap into others’ emotions. God can and will use our words to draw people to Him through His Spirit—perhaps without our even being aware of it. In John 4:27–42, Jesus uses a Samaritan woman with a tarnished reputation to bring Samaritans (people whom the disciples and the Jews looked down upon) to faith. Like the disciples, we have to realize the urgency of the good news. We have to show others that the kingdom of heaven is at hand. We are called to action. Verbalizing, with humility, what …

Morning and Evening

Morning, February 9Go To Evening Reading
“And David enquired of the Lord.” —2 Samuel 5:23
When David made this inquiry he had just fought the Philistines and gained a signal victory. The Philistines came up in great hosts, but, by the help of God, David had easily put them to flight. Note, however, that when they came a second time, David did not go up to fight them without enquiring of the Lord. Once he had been victorious, and he might have said, as many have in other cases, “I shall be victorious again; I may rest quite sure that if I have conquered once I shall triumph yet again. Wherefore should I tarry to seek at the Lord’s hands?” Not so, David. He had gained one battle by the strength of the Lord; he would not venture upon another until he had ensured the same. He inquired, “Shall I go up against them?” He waited until God’s sign was given. Learn from David to take no step without God. Christian, if thou wouldst know the path of duty, take God for thy compass; if thou wouldst ste…

Chambers, Oswald. My Utmost for His Highest

February 9th Are you exhausted spiritually? The everlasting God … fainteth not, neither is weary.Isaiah 40:28. Exhaustion means that the vital forces are worn right out. Spiritual exhaustion never comes through sin but only through service, and whether or not you are exhausted will depend upon where you get your supplies. Jesus said to Peter—“Feed My sheep,” but He gave him nothing to feed them with. The process of being made broken bread and poured-out wine means that you have to be the nourishment for other souls until they learn to feed on God. They must drain you to the dregs. Be careful that you get your supply, or before long you will be utterly exhausted. Before other souls learn to draw on the life of the Lord Jesus direct, they have to draw on it through you; you have to be literally ‘sucked’ until they learn to take their nourishment from God. We owe it to God to be our best for His lambs and His sheep as well as for Himself. Has the way in which you have been serving God betray…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

February 9 Therefore will the Lord wait, that he may be gracious unto you Isa. 30:8 This is God’s way. In the darkest hours of the night, His tread draws near across the billows. As the day of execution is breaking, the angel comes to Peter’s cell. When the scaffold for Mordecai is complete, the royal sleeplessness leads to a reaction in favor of the threatened race. Ah, soul, it may have come to the worst with thee ere thou art delivered; but thou wilt be! God may keep thee waiting, but He will ever be mindful of His covenant and will appear to fulfill His inviolable word. F. B. Meyer

 Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.