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Showing posts from March 6, 2017

St. Augustine on Ephesians 5:16

St. Augustine on Ephesians 5:16Ephesians 5:16 Excerpt But as concerning these days which we are passing now, the Apostle says, “Redeeming the time, because the days are evil.”3 Are not these days indeed evil which we spend in this corruptible flesh, in or under so heavy a load of the corruptible body, amid such great temptations, amid such great difficulties, where there is but false pleasure, no security of joy, a tormenting fear, a greedy covetousness, a withering sadness? Lo, what evil days! Yet no one is willing to end these same evil days, and hence men earnestly pray God that they may live long. Yet what is it to live long, but to be long tormented? What is it to live long, but to add evil days to evil l days? When boys are growing up, it is as if days are being added to them; whereas they do not know that they are being diminished; and their real reckoning is false. For as we grow in up, the number of our days rather diminishes than increases. Appoint for any man at his birth, fo…

The Fall

The FallExcerpt ‎According to the sacred narrative, there were two trees standing side by side in the garden of Eden which had a peculiar symbolical or sacramental character. The one was called the Tree of Life, the other the Tree of Knowledge. The former was the symbol of life, and its fruit was not to be eaten except on the condition of man’s retaining his integrity. Whether the fruit of that tree had inherent virtue to impart life, i.e., to sustain the body of man in its youthful vigour and beauty, or gradually to refine it until it should become like to what the glorified body of Christ now is, or whether the connection between eating its fruit and immortality was simply conventional and sacramental, we cannot determine. It is enough to know that partaking of that tree secured in some way the enjoyment of eternal life. … More Hodge, Charles. Systematic Theology. Vol. 2. Oak Harbor, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc., 1997. Print.

Seventy Times Seven

Seventy Times SevenExcerpt It was a settled rule of Rabbinism that forgiveness should not be extended more than three times. Even so, the practice was terribly different. The Talmud relates without blame. The conduct of a rabbi who would not forgive a minuscule slight of his dignity. Though asked by the offender for thirteen successive years, and on the day of atonement, the reason being that the offended rabbi had learned by a dream that his offending brother would attain the highest dignity. After that he feigned himself irreconcilable, to force the other to migrate from Palestine to Babylon, where, unenvied by him, he might occupy the chief place (Edersheim). It must, therefore, have seemed to Peter a stretch of charity to extend forgiveness from three to seven times. Christ is not specifying the number of times greater than the limit of seven. He means that there is to be no limit. “Forgiveness is qualitative, not quantitative.” More Vincent, Marvin Richardson. Word Studies in the N…

Full Assurance of Faith

Full Assurance of FaithExcerpt “Let us draw near” (προσερχώμεθα) is a liturgical phrase, denoting the approach of the people, after ceremonial atonement, to the earthly sanctuary (cf. ver. 1τοὺς προσερχομένους). We may now draw near to the very heavenly mercy-seat, without any sense of a bar to our doing so on the ground of consciousness of sin. In Christ, we are to see accomplished all that is needed for atonement. But there are conditions also required in ourselves, expressed first by the “true heart”, and the “fulness of faith”, and then by the clauses that follow. These clauses, like προσερχώμεθα, have a liturgical basis—that of the blood sprinkling (e.g. of the people with the blood of the covenant under Mount Sinai, ch. 9:19, and of the priests on their consecration, Lev. 8:23) and of the ablutions before sacrificial service (Lev. 8:616:424Exod. 30:39). Hence these two participial clauses are not to be separated from each other and seem best to be both taken in connection…

Connect the Testaments

March 6: Signs and Satire Numbers 6:1–27; John 13:21–38; Psalm 7:1–17 The images of judgment in Psa 7 are sometimes hard to take. We are so acquainted with a God of love that it’s difficult to understand a God who blinds eyes, hardens hearts, and “has indignation every day” (Psa 7:11). While these passages paint a picture of a judging God, they also emphasize how foolish and evil people can be—specifically focusing on those who push the boundaries of God’s mercy and thus eventually find themselves outside of it. In Psalm 7, God is preparing to judge the evil man. Suddenly, the psalm switches focus to the evil man’s situations: “See, he travails with evil. He is pregnant with trouble, and he gives birth to deception. He makes a pit and digs it out, then falls into the trap he has made” (Psa 7:14–15). The evil man’s folly is directly correlated to God’s just judgment. God is ready and willing to forgive those who repent. But the evil man dwells in evil—he conceives it and is intimately con…

Morning and Evening

Morning, March 6Go To Evening Reading
“Ye must be born again.” —John 3:7
Regeneration is a subject which lies at the very basis of salvation, and we should be very diligent to take heed that we really are “born again,” for there are many who fancy they are, who are not. Be assured that the name of a Christian is not the nature of a Christian. And that being born in a Christian land, and being recognized as professing the Christian religion is of no avail whatever, unless there be something more added to it—the being “born again,” is a matter so mysterious, that human words cannot describe it. “The wind bloweth where it listeth, and thou hearest the sound thereof, but canst does not tell whence it cometh, and whither it goeth: so is every one that is born of the Spirit.” Nevertheless, it is a change which is known and felt: known by works of holiness, and felt by a gracious experience. This great job is supernatural. It is not an operation which a man performs for himself: a new principle…

My Utmost for His Highest

March 6th Amid a crowd of paltry things … in much patience, in afflictions, in necessities, in distresses.2 Cor. 6:4. It takes Almighty grace to take the next step when there is no vision and no spectator—the next step in devotion, the next step in your study, in your reading, in your kitchen; the next step in your duty, when there is no vision from God, no enthusiasm, and no spectator. It takes far more of the grace of God, far more conscious drawing upon God to take that step than it does to preach the Gospel. Every Christian has to partake of what was the essence of the Incarnation, he must bring the thing down into flesh-and-blood actualities and work it out through the fingertips. We flag when there is no vision, no uplift, but just the common round, the trivial task. The thing that tells in the long run for God and for men is the steady persevering work in the unseen, and the only way to keep the life uncrushed is to live looking to God. Ask God to keep the eyes of your spirit open …

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

March 6 To me to live is Christ, and to die is gain Phil. 1:21 Live in Christ, and you are in the suburbs of Heaven. There is but a thin wall between you and the land of praises. You are within one hour’s sailing of the shore of the newCanaan. William Rutherford

 Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.