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Showing posts from March 8, 2017

Pass From Death to Life

Pass From Death to LifeExcerpt This is a spiritual resurrection (see Eph. 2:1–3) and takes place when sinners hear the Word and believe. The man Christ healed was really a living dead man. When he heard the Word and believed, he was given new life in his body. Christ has life in Himself, for Christis “the Life” (14:6) and therefore can give life to others. More Wiersbe, Warren W. Wiersbe’s Expository Outlines on the New Testament. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1992. Print.

Saul’s Conversion

Saul’s ConversionExcerpt This experience is described in detail in three different places in the book of the Acts, which shows just how important it was not only in Paul’s life but in the entire history of the early church. In Acts 9:3–19 there is Luke’s summary account of what happened; then 22:6–16 presents a personal account given by Paul defending himself before a Jewish mob in Jerusalem. And finally, in 26:9–23 there is yet another account given by Paul, this time in his defence before Herod Agrippa II. The three accounts do not agree precisely in every detail, and it is clear that Luke used them to build up a composite picture, exploring the different nuances of the experience that would be especially relevant to the concerns of the different circumstances depicted in his narrative. More Drane, John William. Introducing the New Testament. Completely rev. and updated. Oxford: Lion Publishing plc, 2000. Print.

Origins of the Samaritans

Origins of the SamaritansJohn 4:1–45 Excerpt Josephus traces their origins to the foreigners (he calls them Cutheans) forcibly brought into the territory of Israel after its defeat by the Assyrians in 722 b.c.e. (2 Kgs. 17). The earliest evidence of the schism between Jew and Samaritan comes from the Persian period. This includes the more ambiguous mention of Samaritans in Ezra 4, which could be a geographical designation of peoples rather than a reference to a religious group. More Anderson, Robert T. “Samaritans.” Ed. David Noel Freedman, Allen C. Myers, and Astrid B. Beck. Eerdmans dictionary of the Bible 2000 : 1159. Print.

Stir Up One Another

Stir Up One AnotherExcerpt “And” (he says) “let us consider one another to provoke unto love and to good works. Not forsaking the assembling of ourselves together, as the manner of some is, but exhorting8 one another and so much the more as ye see the day approaching.” And again in other places, “The Lord is at hand; be careful about nothing.” (Phil. iv. 5Phil. iv. 6.) “For now is our salvation nearer: Henceforth the time is short.” (Rom. xiii. 11.) What is, “not forsaking the assembling of ourselves together”? (1 Cor. vii. 29.) He knew that much strength arises from being together and assembling together.“For where two or three” (it is said) “are gathered together in My name, there am I in the midst of them” (Matt. xviii. 20); And again, “That they may be One, as we” also are (John xvii. 11); and, “They had all one heart and [one] soul.” (Acts iv. 32.) And not this only, but also because love is increased by the gathering [of ourselves] together; and love being increased, of necessit…

Connect the Testaments

March 8: The Vine and the Branches Numbers 7:48–89; John 15:1–16:4; Psalm 9:1–7 Jesus isn’t simply a high priority or even the highest priority of our lives. He is the source of life. In the Gospel of John, Jesus teaches the disciples that they need to depend on Him for their very lives—both in the present and for eternal life. “I am the vine; you are the branches. The one who remains in me and I in him—this one bears much fruit, for apart from me you are not able to do anything. If anyone does not remain in me, he is thrown out as a branch, and dries up, and they gather them and throw them into the fire, and they are burned” (John 15:5–6). We rarely think in these terms today. However, the disciples faced persecution and even death on account of their faith in Jesus. Our lives, like theirs, will be held to the same measure. They are being held to the same measure. Today, when you look at your life, and the lives of those closest to you, do you see fruit and abundance? Or do you see anothe…

Morning and Evening

Morning, March 8 Go To Evening Reading
“We must through much tribulation enter into the kingdom of God.” —Acts 14:22
God’s people have their trials. It was never designed by God, when he chose his people, that they should be an untried people. They were chosen in the furnace of affliction; they were never chosen to worldly peace and earthly joy. Freedom from sickness and the pains of mortality was never promised them; but when their Lord drew up the charter of privileges, he included chastisements amongst the things to which they should inevitably be heirs. Trials are a part of our lot; they were predestinated for us in Christ’s last legacy. So surely as the stars are fashioned by his hands, and their orbits fixed by him, so surely are our trials allotted to us: he has ordained their season and their place, their intensity and the effect they shall have upon us. Good men must never expect to escape troubles; if they do, they will be disappointed, for none of their predecessors have been …

My Utmost for His Highest

March 8th The relinquished life I am crucified with Christ.Gal. 2:20. No one is ever united with Jesus Christ until he is willing to relinquish not sin only, but his whole way of looking at things. To be born from above of the Spirit of God means that we must let go before we lay hold, and in the first stages it is the relinquishing of all pretence. What Our Lord wants us to present to Him is not goodness, nor honesty, nor endeavour, but real solid sin; that is all He can take from us. And what does He give in exchange for our sin? Real solid righteousness. But we must relinquish all pretence of being anything, all claim of being worthy of God’s consideration. Then the Spirit of God will show us what further there is to relinquish. There will have to be the relinquishing of my claim to my right to myself in every phase. Am I willing to relinquish my hold on all I possess, my hold on my affections, and on everything, and to be identified with the death of Jesus Christ? There is always a sha…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

March 8 Quench not the Spirit 1 Thess. 5:19 In order that you may not quench the Spirit, you must make it a constant study to know what is the mind of the Spirit. You must discriminate with the utmost care between His suggestions and the suggestions of your own deceitful heart. You will keep in constant recollection what are the offices of the Spirit as described by Christ in the Gospel ofJohn. You will be on your guard against impulsive movements, inconsiderate acts, rash words. You will abide in prayer. Search the Word. Confess Christ on all possible occasions. Seek the society of His people. Shrink from conformity to the world, its vain fashions, unmeaning etiquette. Be scrupulous in your reading. “What I say unto you, I say unto all, watch!”“Have oil in your lamps.” “Quench not the Spirit.” Bowen

 Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.