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Showing posts from March 22, 2017

Eternal Life

Eternal LifeActs 13:4648 Excerpt This phrase eternal life is probably one of the most difficult expressions of the Bible to render satisfactorily. Literally the meaning of “eternal” or “everlasting” refers to length of time, for example, “life that never ends.” But this can be very seriously misunderstood if people are to conclude that by becoming Christians they will never die. On the other hand, to use an expression such as “life which comes from God” or “true life” is to miss some of the significance of this quality of life which does continue not only throughout one’s earthly lifetime, but even after death. In some languages an attempt has been made to represent both the qualitative and the quantitative factors involved by translating “real life which never ends.” This may ultimately be the best solution. More Newman, Barclay Moon, and Eugene Albert Nida. A Handbook on the Acts of the Apostles. New York: United Bible Societies, 1972. Print. UBS Handbook Series.

“The Sinner’s Surrender to His Preserver.”

The Sinner’s Surrender to His PreserverExcerpt ‎Job was one of those whom Scripture describes as “perfect,” yet he cried, “I have sinned.” Noah was perfect in his generation, but no drunkard will allow us to forget that he had his fault. Abraham received the command, “Walk before me and be thou perfect,” but he was not absolutely sinless. Zacharias and Elizabeth were blameless, and yet there was enough unbelief in Zacharias to make him dumb for nine months. ‎The doctrine of sinless perfection in the flesh is not of God, and he who makes his boast of possessing such perfection has at once declared his own ignorance of himself and of the law of the Lord. Nothing discovers an evil heart more surely than a glorying in its own goodness. He who proclaims his own praise reveals his own shame. … More Spurgeon, C. H. “The Sinner’s Surrender to His Preserver.”Sermon Outlines for Evangelistic Services. Ed. Al Bryant. Grand Rapids, MI: Kregel Publications, 1992. 14. Print.

Paul Quotes Isaiah

Paul Quotes IsaiahEphesians 2:17 Excerpt Paul used Isaiah 57:19 (quoted in 2:17) and Psalm 118:22 or Isaiah 28:16 (alluded to in 2:20) to show how Christ, as the cornerstone, brought those who were near and far together into one holy temple in the Spirit. The words “But now” (2:13) introduce a contrast with the Gentile’s previous position (2:11–12). Christ brought peace (2:14) by joining the two groups into one. The “wall” (2:14) is an allusion to the wall on the temple grounds that separated the court of the Gentiles from the court that only Jews could enter. The death penalty would be inflicted if a Gentile passed that barrier. That wall of hostility had been broken down in Christ. More Hughes, Robert B., and J. Carl Laney. Tyndale Concise Bible Commentary. Wheaton, IL: Tyndale House Publishers, 2001. Print. The Tyndale Reference Library.

Branches Of Church History

Branches Of Church HistoryExcerpt ‎The kingdom of Christ, in its principle and aim, is as comprehensive as humanity. It is truly catholic or universal, designed and adapted for all nations and ages, for all the powers of the soul, and all classes of society. It breathes into the mind, the heart, and the will a higher, supernatural life, and consecrates the family, the state, science, literature, art, and commerce to holy ends, till finally, God becomes all in all. Even the body, and the whole visible creation, which groans for redemption from its bondage to vanity and for the glorious liberty of the children of God, shall share in this universal transformation; for we look for the resurrection of the body, and for the new earth, wherein dwelleth righteousness. But we must not identify the kingdom of God with the visible church or churches, which are only its temporary organs and agencies, more or less inadequate, while the kingdom itself is more comprehensive, and will last forever. … 

Connect the Testaments

March 22: Forsaken to Delight Numbers 26:1–65; 1 Corinthians 8:1–9:27; Psalm 22:1–13 “My God, my God why have you forsaken me? Why are you far from helping me, far from the words of my groaning?” (Psa 22:1). These are some of the darkest words in Scripture. It’s almost painful to speak them, to imagine a feeling of complete abandonment by God. These are also the words we hear Jesus say when He is hanging from the cross (Matt 27:46). When He utters them, He makes Himself one with this ultimate sufferer, this true lamenter, in Psa 22. He is essentially saying, “I am He: the one who has suffered the most for God’s cause and thus knows what it means to be human.” The plea in this psalm becomes even sadder, but then it is followed by a surprising affirmation of complete faithfulness in God: “O my God, I call by day and you do not answer, and by night but I have no rest. Yet you are holy, enthroned on the praises of Israel” (Psa 22:2–3). The very nature of crying out to God, even in a time of f…

Morning and Evening

Morning, March 22Go To Evening Reading
“And he went a little farther, and fell on his face, and prayed.” —Matthew 26:39
There are several instructive features in our Saviour’s prayer in his hour of trial. It was lonely prayer. He withdrew even from his three favoured disciples. Believer, be much in solitary prayer, especially in times of trial. Family prayer, social prayer, prayer in the Church, will not suffice, these are very precious, but the best beaten spice will smoke in your censer in your private devotions, where no ear hears but God’s.
It was humble prayer. Luke says he knelt, but another evangelist says he “fell on his face.” Where, then, must be thy place, thou humble servant of the great Master? What dust and ashes should cover thy head! Humility gives us good foot-hold in prayer. There is no hope of prevalence with God unless we abase ourselves that he may exalt us in due time.
It was filial prayer. “Abba, Father.” You will find it a stronghold in the day of trial to plead you…

My Utmost for His Highest

March 22nd The burning heart Did not our heart burn within us?Luke 24:32. We need to learn this secret of the burning heart. Suddenly Jesus appears to us, the fires are kindled, we have wonderful visions; then we have to learn to keep the secret of the burning heart that will go through anything. It is the dull, bald, dreary, commonplace day, with commonplace duties and people, that kills the burning heart unless we have learned the secret of abiding in Jesus. Much of our distress as Christians comes not because of sin, but because we are ignorant of the laws of our own nature. For instance, the only test as to whether we ought to allow an emotion to have its way is to see what the outcome of the emotion will be. Push it to its logical conclusion, and if the outcome is something God would condemn, allow it no more way. But if it is an emotion kindled by the Spirit of God and you do not let that emotion have its right issue in your life, it will react on a lower level. That is the way sent…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

March 22 And he said, O my Lord, send, I pray thee, by the hand of him whom thou wilt send Exod. 4:13 It was a very grudging assent. It was as much as to say, “Since Thou art determined to send me and I must undertake the mission, then let it be so; but I would that it might have been another, and I go because I am compelled.” So often do we shrink back from the sacrifice or obligation to which God calls us, that we think we are going to our doom? We seek every reason for evading the divine will; little realizing that He is forcing us out from our quiet homes into a career. Which includes among other things, the song of victory on the banks of the Red Sea. The two lonely sojourns for forty days in converse with God; the shining face; the vision of glory; the burial by the hand of Michael; and the supreme honor of standing beside the Lord on the Transfiguration mountain. F. B. Meyer

 Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electron…