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The World in the Gospel of John

The World in the Gospel ofJohnJohn 3:16–1719 Excerpt In the Gospel of John, the world is the object of God’s salvation in Christ (John3:16; 12:47). Moreover, it is his creation through Christ (John1:310). Yet the world apart from Christ stands under judgment (John 16:8-11), hating Jesus’ followers, who have been separated from the world and are not of the world (John 17:16). The dualism between God, Christ, and the disciples, on the one hand, and the world, on the other, is described regarding a sharp antinomy. Followers are urged to have nothing to do with the world, especially not to love it (1 John2:15-17). At the same time, Jesus has explicitly not prayed for disciples to be taken out of the world (John 17:15). Even in the Fourth Gospel, the world continues to be God’s, in creation and salvation. It is the same world that Matthew has in view as he portrays the risen Jesus sending his disciples to make disciples of all nations (Matthew 28:19) or Luke as Jesus informs the disciple…

Gospel of John

The World in the Gospel of JohnJohn 3:16–1719 Excerpt In the Gospel of John, the world is the object of God’s salvation in Christ (John3:16; John 12:47). Moreover, it is his creation through Christ (John1:310). Yet the world apart from Christ stands under judgment (John16:8-11), hating Jesus’ followers, who have been separated from the world and are not of the world (John 17:16). The dualism between God, Christ, and the disciples, on the one hand, and the world, on the other, is described in terms of a sharp antinomy. Disciples are urged to have nothing to do with the world, especially not to love it (1 John2:15-17). At the same time, Jesus has explicitly not prayed for disciples to be taken out of the world (John17:15). Even in the Fourth Gospel, the world continues to be God’s, in creation and salvation. It is the same world that Matthew has in view as he portrays the risen Jesus sending his disciples to make disciples of all nations (Matthew 28:19) or Luke as Jesus informs the di…

A Samaritan Gives Thanks

A Samaritan Gives ThanksExcerpt Only one of the ten men was grateful enough to come first to Jesus and thank Him for His merciful gift of healing. (See Ps. 107:8Ps. 107:15,  Ps. 107:21, and Ps. 107:31.) But the astounding thing is that this man was a Samaritan! Imagine a Samaritan giving thanks to a Jew! But because he did, this man received an even greater gift: he was saved from his sins. “Your faith has made you well” can be translated, “Your faith has saved you” (see  Luke7:50, NKJV). Physical healing is a great blessing, but it ends at death; while the blessing of eternal life lasts forever. More Wiersbe, Warren W. Wiersbe’s Expository Outlines on the New Testament. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1992. Print.

Good Masters

Good MastersExcerpt The particular Greek word translated “servants” indicates that these were household slaves. They were Christian slaves serving for the most part in the homes of pagan masters. The fact that Peter singles them out for special admonitions indicates that slaves, as a class, formed a large part of the early Christian community. The slaves are exhorted to put themselves in subjection to their absolute lords and masters. They are to do this to the good and gentle ones. Some of these pagan masters had what the poet calls “the milk of human kindness.” They were good to their slaves. The Greek word translated “good,” refers to inner intrinsic goodness. They were good at heart. The word “gentle” in the Greek refers to that disposition which is mild, yielding, indulgent. It is derived from a Greek word meaning, “not being unduly rigorous.”More Wuest, Kenneth S. Wuest’s Word Studies from the Greek New Testament: For the English Reader. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1997. Print.

Connect the Testaments

March 29: Prayer and Hope for the Anxious Numbers 33:1–49; 1 Corinthians 15:12–34; Psalm 28:1–9 Anxiety, depression, and fear aren’t part of the Christian life—or the ideal Christian life, anyway. But for those who struggle with these emotions, this tidy concept isn’t helpful or true. What is helpful is hope and belief in the midst of tumultuous emotion. The writer of Psalm 28 expresses deep anxiety, but even as he does this, he expresses trust in Yahweh: “To you, O Yahweh, I call. O my rock, do not be deaf to me. Or else, if you are silent to me, then I will become like those descending to the pit” (Psalm 28:1). Though he feels like God is not listening, the psalmist doesn’t stop pursuing God. He worships and cries for help anyway. In contrast to the “workers of evil” who “do not regard the works of Yahweh, nor the work of his hands,” the psalmist puts all of his dependence and trust in Yahweh (Psalm 28:3, 5). Halfway through the psalm, the petition turns to praise when Yahweh answers hi…

Morning and Evening

Morning, March 29Go To Evening Reading
“Though he were a Son, yet learned he obedience by the things which he suffered.” —Hebrews 5:8
We are told that the Captain of our salvation was made perfect through suffering, therefore we who are sinful, and who are far from being perfect, must not wonder if we are called to pass through suffering too. Shall the head be crowned with thorns, and shall the other members of the body be rocked upon the dainty lap of ease? Must Christ pass through seas of his own blood to win the crown, and are we to walk to heaven dryshod in silver slippers? No, our Master’s experience teaches us that suffering is necessary, and the true-born child of God must not, would not, escape it if he might. But there is one very comforting thought in the fact of Christ’s“being made perfect through suffering”—it is, that he can have complete sympathy with us. “He is not an high priest that cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities.” In this sympathy of Christ we fin…

My Utmost for His Highest

March 29th Our Lord’s surprise visits Be ye therefore ready also.Luke 12:40. The great need for the Christian worker is to be ready to face Jesus Christ at any and every turn. This is not easy, no matter what our experience is. The battle is not against sin or difficulties or circumstances, but against being so absorbed in work that we are not ready to face Jesus Christ at every turn. That is the one great need, not facing our belief, or our creed, or the question whether we are of any use, but to face Him. Jesus rarely comes where we expect Him; He appears where we least expect Him, and always in the most illogical connections. The only way a worker can keep true to God is by being ready for the Lord’s surprise visits. It is not service that matters, but intense spiritual reality, expecting Jesus Christ at every turn. This will give our life the attitude of child-wonder which He wants it to have. If we are going to be ready for Jesus Christ, we have to stop being religious (that is, usin…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

March 29 The path of the just is as the shining light, that shineth more and more unto the perfect day Prov. 4:18 Have I begun this path of heavenly love and knowledge now? Am I progressing in it? Do I feel some dawnings of the heavenly light, earnests and antepasts of the full day of glory? Let all God’s dealings serve to quicken me in my way. Let every affection it may please Him to send, be as the moving pillar—cloud of old, beckoning me to move my tent onward, saying, “Arise ye and depart, for this is not your rest.” Let me be often standing now on faith’s lofty eminences, looking, for “the day of God”—the rising sun which is to set no more in weeping clouds. Wondrous progression! How will all earth’s learning, its boasted acquirements and eagle-eyed philosophy sink into the lispings of very infancy in comparison with this manhood of knowledge! Heaven will be the true “Excelsior,” its song, “a song of degrees,” Jesus leading His people from height to height of glory, and saying, as H…