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Showing posts from April 11, 2017

Simeon

SimeonLuke 2:2534 Excerpt A man in Jerusalem who was righteous and devout and who was looking for ‘the consolation of Israel’ (Lk. 2:25–35). He is not to be identified with Rabbi Simon ben Hillel. He was one of the remnant who were longing for the coming of the Messiah, and had received a direct revelation that he would not die before seeing the Messiah with his own eyes. When the presentation of Jesus was about to take place he was guided by the Spirit to come into the Temple. On seeing Jesus he uttered the hymn of praise now known as the *Nunc Dimittis. He saw that the Messiah would vindicate Israel in the eyes of the Gentiles. Simeon went on to speak to the astonished Mary of the role of Christ within Israel. He was to be like a stone causing some to fall and some to rise. He was to be a sign which would not be heeded but spoken against (34). Her own suffering as she watched his life and death was to be acute and he was to reveal the inmost thoughts of men (35). Having given his te…

Fathers and Mothers

Fathers and MothersExcerpt This is the title of the new part of the book; it is omitted in the Septuagint. There is some kind of loose connection in the grouping of these proverbs, but it is difficult to follow. “Ordo frustra quæritur ubi nullus fuit observatus,” says Mart. Geier. Wordsworth considers the present chapter to contain exemplifications of the principles and results of the two ways of life displayed in the preceding nine chapters. The antithetical character of the sentences is most marked and well-sustained. As the book is specially designed for the edification of youth, it begins with an appropriate saying. A wise son maketh a glad father. As wisdom comprises all moral excellence, and folly is vice and perversity, the opposite characters attributed to the son are obvious. The mother is introduced for the sake of parallelism; though some commentators suggest that, as the father would be naturally elated by his son’s virtues, which would conduce to honour and high estate, so…

Grace and Peace

Grace and PeaceExcerpt Paul’s greetings have always combined the Greek (“grace”) and Hebrew (“peace”) greetings, but they are also theologized as an eschatological promise that the Christian experiences God’s grace and the peace in an entirely new way as a result of what God and Christ have done. What the Greeks and Hebrews symbolically sought in their greetings has now been actualized in Christ. Finally, we can truly experience God’s grace and find peace. The reason is that God is our Father, establishing a whole new intimacy in our relationship with him, and Christ has become our Lord as a result of his resurrection (see especially v. 4 above). More Osborne, Grant R. Romans. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2004. Print. The IVP New Testament Commentary Series

Two Views of Adam’s Sin

Two Views of Adam’s SinRomans 5:12 Excerpt The Greek past (aorist) tense occurs in all three verbs in this verse. So the entire human race is viewed as having sinned in the one act of Adam’s sin (cf. “all have sinned,” also the Gr. past tense, in 3:23). Two ways of explaining this participation of the human race in the sin of Adam have been presented by theologians—the “federal headship” of Adam over the race and the “natural or seminal headship” of Adam. (Others say that people merely imitated Adam, that he gave the human race a bad example. But that does not do justice to 5:12.) The federal headship view considers Adam, the first man, as the representative of the human race that generated from him. As the representative of all humans, Adam’s act of sin was considered by God to be the act of all people and his penalty of death was judicially made the penalty of everybody. The natural headship view, on the other hand, recognizes that the entire human race was seminally and physically in A…

Connect the Testaments: A One-Year Daily Devotional with Bible Reading Plan

April 11: Curses, the Old Testament, and Freedom Deuteronomy 21:1–22:30; 2 Corinthians 5:11–21; Psalm 38:1–22 “And if a man commits a sin punishable by death, and so he is put to and you hang him on a tree, his dead body shall not hang on the tree, but certainly you shall bury him on that day, for cursed by God is one that is being hung” (Deut 21:22–23). Being hung on a tree was a sign of being cursed. Romans 5:12 tells us that the punishment of sin is death; we as sinners deserve that curse. If Christ wasn’t cursed for us by being hung on a tree (the cross), then we would still have a debt to pay and a curse to live under. It can be difficult to find significance in the ot, especially in passages that are as harsh as this one. But the ot still holds meaning for us today, and that meaning often reveals our human and individual state. The same is true for those odd laws about crimes and marrying foreigners (Deut 21:1–14). It’s not that we’re supposed to practice these laws; they were intend…

Morning and Evening: Daily Readings

Morning, April 11Go To Evening Reading
“I am poured out like water, and all my bones are out of joint.” —Psalm 22:14
Did earth or heaven ever behold a sadder spectacle of woe! In soul and body, our Lord felt himself to be weak as water poured upon the ground. The placing of the cross in its socket had shaken him with great violence, had strained all the ligaments, pained every nerve, and more or less dislocated all his bones. Burdened with his own weight, the august sufferer felt the strain increasing every moment of those six long hours. His sense of faintness and general weakness were overpowering; while to his own consciousness he became nothing but a mass of misery and swooning sickness. When Daniel saw the great vision, he thus describes his sensations, “There remained no strength in me, for my vigour was turned into corruption, and I retained no strength:” how much more faint must have been our greater Prophet when he saw the dread vision of the wrath of God, and felt it in his own…

My Utmost for His Highest: Selections for the Year

April 11th Moral divinity For if we have been planted together in the likeness of His death, we shall be also in the likeness of His resurrection. Romans 6:5. Co-Resurrection. The proof that I have been through crucifixion with Jesus is that I have a decided likeness to Him. The incoming of the Spirit of Jesus into me readjusts my personal life to God. The resurrection of Jesus has given Him authority to impart the life of God to me, and my experimental life must be constructed on the basis of His life. I can have the resurrection life of Jesus now, and it will show itself in holiness. The idea all through the Apostle Paul’s writings is that after the moral decision to be identified with Jesus in His death has been made, the resurrection life of Jesus invades every bit of my human nature. It takes omnipotence to live the life of the Son of God in mortal flesh. The Holy Spirit cannot be located as a Guest in a house, He invades everything. When once I decide that my “old man” (i.e., the he…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

April 11 Bear ye one another’s burdens, and so fulfill the law of Christ Gal. 6:2 However perplexed you may at any hour become about some question of truth, one refuge and resource is always at hand: you can do something for someone besides yourself. At the times when you cannot see God, there is still open to you this sacred possibility, to show God: for it is the love and kindness of human hearts through which the divine reality comes home to men, whether they name it or not. Let this thought, then, stay with you: there may be times when you cannot find help, but there is no time when you cannot give help. George Merriam
 Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.