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Showing posts from April 12, 2017

What Brought Death?

What Brought Death?Romans 7:13 Excerpt It was not the Law that brought death to Paul; rather sin used what is good (the Law) to accomplish this. The outcome was that sin’s true nature was revealed (NEB “sin exposed its true character”; JB “but sin, to show itself in its true colors”). Paul is saying that one cannot see how evil sin is until he realizes that sin takes what is good, that is, a divine command, and uses this to bring death to men. More Newman, Barclay Moon, and Eugene Albert Nida. A Handbook on Paul’s Letter to the Romans. New York: United Bible Societies, 1973. Print. UBS Handbook Series.

Connect the Testaments: A One-Year Daily Devotional with Bible Reading Plan

April 12: Costly Grace Deuteronomy 23:1–25:19; 2 Corinthians 6:1–13; Psalm 39 When we say something hurtful to a friend or a family member, we know we can’t just ignore the harm we have caused (we should know, anyway). In order to repair the relationship and earn back trust, we have to acknowledge the rift we’ve created. But when it comes to our relationship with God, we don’t always look at it the same way. Sometimes, consciously or unconsciously, we belittle the incredible love that He has shown us. When we don’t acknowledge our sin as an act of rebellion, we feel far from God. We’ve created this great divide because we’ve tarnished our relationship with Him. In Psalm 39, the psalmist is in great agony over his sin—to the point where he acknowledges that people are nothing and his life is vanity: “Surely a man walks about as a mere shadow” (Psa 39:6). Without God, life is meaningless. The psalmist acknowledges that his transgression has done great harm. He turns to God and says: “And no…

Morning and Evening: Daily Readings

Morning, April 12Go To Evening Reading
“My heart is like wax; it is melted in the midst of my bowels.” —Psalm 22:14
Our blessed Lord experienced a terrible sinking and melting of soul. “The spirit of a man will sustain his infirmity, but a wounded spirit who can bear?” Deep depression of spirit is the most grievous of all trials; all besides is as nothing. Well might the suffering Saviour cry to his God, “Be not far from me,” for above all other seasons a man needs his God when his heart is melted within him because of heaviness. Believer, come near the cross this morning, and humbly adore the King of glory as having once been brought far lower, in mental distress and inward anguish, than any one among us; and mark his fitness to become a faithful High Priest, who can be touched with a feeling of our infirmities. Especially let those of us whose sadness springs directly from the withdrawal of a present sense of our Father’s love, enter into near and intimate communion with Jesus. Let us …

My Utmost for His Highest: Selections for the Year

April 12th Moral dominion Death hath no more dominion over Him … in that He liveth, Heliveth unto God. Likewise reckon ye also yourselves to be dead indeed unto sin, but alive unto God.Romans 6:9–11 . Co-Eternal Life. Eternal life was the life which Jesus Christ exhibited on the human plane, and it is the same life, not a copy of it, which is manifested in our mortal flesh when we are born of God. Eternal life is not a gift from God, eternal life is the gift of God. The energy and the power which were manifested in Jesus will be manifested in us by the sheer sovereign grace of God when once we have made the moral decision about sin. “Ye shall receive the power of the Holy Ghost”—not power as a gift from the Holy Ghost; the power is the Holy Ghost, not something which He imparts. The life that was in Jesus is made ours by means of his Cross when once we make the decision to be identified with Him. If it is difficult to get right with God, it is because we will not decide definitely about s…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

April 12 Work out your own salvation with fear and trembling: for it is God which worketh in you both to will and to do of his good pleasure Phil. 2:12, 13 It is not your business and mine to study whether we shall get to Heaven, or even to study whether we shall be good men; it is our business to study how we shall come into the midst of the purposes of God and have the unspeakable privilege in these few years of doing something of His work. Phillips Brooks

 Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.