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Showing posts from May 1, 2017

Be Humble

Be HumbleExcerpt But humility is the only acceptable posture of a person in relation to the God who gives a wide variety of gifts (v. 7a) on the basis of grace (v. 7b) and therefore alone is deserving of praise (v. 7c; cf. 1:4-9). Paul underscored these truths in this series of rhetorical questions. More Lowery, David K. “1 Corinthians.”The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures. Ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck. Vol. 2. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985. 513. Print.

The House of God

The House of GodExcerpt All that the writer has said about the Melchizedek priesthood of Jesus is recalled here. Believers have not only a confident spirit, but also a competent advocate. He is continually available, completely aware of our present situation, and vitally involved with us in working all things together for good. His great concern is the welfare of each member of the household of God, and “we are his house,” as the writer has told us unmistakably in 3:6More Stedman, Ray C. Hebrews. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1992. Print. The IVP New Testament Commentary Series.

Be Hospitable

Be HospitableExcerpt Hospitality (philazenos, “love of strangers”) is a telltale virtue of the people of God. Paul told the Roman church to “Share with God’s people who are in need. Practice hospitality” (Romans 12:13). “Practice” means “pursue” or “chase” and sometimes means “strenuous pursuit.” Christians, and especially leaders, are not simply to wait for opportunities for hospitality but are to pursue them. They are to do it “without grumbling,” as Peter says (1 Peter 4:9). Today’s elder must be a joyous host. He must invite people to his table. His home must be open. Hospitality is all over the New Testament. And the writer of Hebrews offers an enchanting motivation: “Do not forget to entertain strangers, for by so doing some people have entertained angels without knowing it” (13:2). These are God’s thoughts on hospitality! More Hughes, R. Kent, and Bryan Chapell. 1 & 2 Timothy and Titus: To Guard the Deposit. Wheaton, IL: Crossway Books, 2000. Print. Preaching the Word.

It was the Lord’s Will...

It was the Lord’s Will...Isaiah 53:10 Excerpt The suffering and death of the Servant was clearly the Lord’s will. In that sense He was “slain from the Creation of the world” (Rev.13:8). The statement, theLord made the Servant’s life aguilt offering, does not mean that Jesus’ life satisfied the wrath of God but that His life which culminated in His death was the sacrifice for sins. As indicated in Isaiah 53:7-8 He had to die to satisfy the righteous demands of God. The word for “guilt offering” is ’āšām, used in Leviticus 5:156:519:21 and elsewhere of an offering to atone for sin. His death and burial appeared to end His existence (He was “cut off, ”Isa.53:8), but in actuality because of His resurrection Jesus will see His offspring (those who by believing in Him become children of God, John1:12) and He will prolong His days (live on forever as the Son of God). He will be blessed (prosper; cf. Isa.53:12a) because of His obedience to the will (plan) of theLord. More Martin, John A. “Isa…

Catholic Daily Readings

Monday, May 1, 2017 | Easter Monday of the Third Week of Easter Years 1 & 2 | Roman Missal | Lectionary


On the same date: Saint Joseph the Worker First Reading Acts 6:8–15 Response Psalm 119:1ab or Text Psalm Psalm 119:23–24, 26–27, 29–30 Gospel Acclamation Matthew 4:4b GospelJohn 6:22–29

Catholic Daily Readings. Bellingham, WA: Faithlife, 2009. Print.

Connect the Testaments

May 1: Who Will Fight for Us? Judges 1:1–2:10; Philippians 1:1–11; Psalm 61:1–62:12 “Who will go up first for us against the Canaanites to fight against them?” (Judg 1:1). I’ve felt this way before—wondering who will be my advocate in my time of need. It’s ironic that we are surrounded by people, and we have constant access to communication, and yet we can still feel alone. In a world of ambient noise, we’re often left feeling that no one is there to come to our aid. Most of us do have people to help us; it’s just that we’re not willing to ask for help. At all times, we have someone who will be our guide in times of distress. Paul tells us that it is Christ “who began a good work in you [and He] will finish it until the day [He returns]” (Phil 1:6). In essence, the story of Paul and the Philippian believers’ struggles is really the same story told in the book of Judges. God’s people are at war against powers seen and unseen (Phil 3:1–4; compare Col 1:16). They feel lonely and wounded, but…

Morning and Evening

Morning, May 1Go To Evening Reading
“His cheeks are as a bed of spices, as sweet flowers.” —Song of Solomon 5:13
Lo, the flowery month is come! March winds and April showers have done their work, and the earth is all bedecked with beauty. Come my soul, put on thine holiday attire and go forth to gather garlands of heavenly thoughts. Thou knowest whither to betake thyself, for to thee “the beds of spices” are well known, and thou hast so often smelt the perfume of “the sweet flowers,” that thou wilt go at once to thy well-beloved and find all loveliness, all joy in him. That cheek once so rudely smitten with a rod, oft bedewed with tears of sympathy and then defiled with spittle—that cheek as it smiles with mercy is as fragrant aromatic to my heart. Thou didst not hide thy face from shame and spitting, O Lord Jesus, and therefore I will find my dearest delight in praising thee. Those cheeks were furrowed by the plough of grief, and crimsoned with red lines of blood from thy thorn-crowned …

My Utmost for His Highest

May 1st Insight not emotion I have to lead my life in faith, without seeing Him.2 Cor. 5:7. (Moffatt.) For a time we are conscious of God’s attentions, then, when God begins to use us in His enterprises, we take on a pathetic look and talk of the trials and the difficulties, and all the time God is trying to make us do our duty as obscure people. None of us would be obscure spiritually if we could help it. Can we do our duty when God has shut up heaven? Some of us always want to be illuminated saints with golden haloes and the flush of inspiration, and to have the saints of God dealing with us all the time. A gilt-edged saint is no good, he is abnormal, unfit for daily life, and altogether unlike God. We are here as men and women, not as half-fledged angels, to do the work of the world, and to do it with an infinitely greater power to stand the turmoil because we have been born from above. If we try to re-introduce the rare moments of inspiration, it is a sign that it is not God we want. …

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

May 1 Thou art my God: early will I seek thee Ps. 63:1 In a world where there is so much to ruffle the spirit’s plumes, how needful that entering into the secret of God’s pavilion, which will alone bring it back to composure and peace! In a world where there is so much to sadden and depress, how blessed the communion with Him in whom is the one true source and fountain of all true gladness and abiding joy! In a world where so much is ever seeking to unhallow our spirits, to render them common and profane, how high the privilege of consecrating them anew in prayer to holiness and to God. Archbishop Trench

 Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.