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Showing posts from May 2, 2017

The Work of the Gospel

The Work of the GospelPhilippians 1:5 Excerpt The word “gospel” originally meant a reward for bringing good news, but later it came to be used for good news itself, often the joyous news of victory in war. In the New Testament it always means good news itself and refers to the salvation that God has made possible through the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. The word appears nine times in Philippians and is used in a variety of ways. It is the message about Jesus Christ that is proclaimed (1.54.15), defended (1.716), promoted, spread, and advanced (4.31.122.22). It is also the standard of Christian living and basis of faith (1.27). The phrase in this context is not a reference to the Philippians’ sharing in accepting Paul’s preaching, but rather to their active participation in the work of the gospel. It may therefore be expressed as “in proclaiming the good news to others,” or “in the telling of the good news to others.”More Loh, I-Jin, and Eugene Albert Nida. A Handbook o…

Love and Obedience

Love and ObedienceJohn 14:15 Excerpt The uncompromising connection between love for Christ and obedience to Christ repeatedly recurs in John’s writings (cf. vv. 212315:14). The linkage approaches the level of definition: ‘This is love for God: to obey his commands’ (1 Jn. 5:3). But what are his ‘commands’? The parallels that tie together ‘what I command’ (v. 15, lit. ‘my commands’), ‘commands’ (v. 21), and ‘my teaching’ (lit. ‘my word’ in v. 23, and ‘my words’ in v. 24) suggest to some that more is at stake than Jesus’ ethical commands. What the one who loves Jesus will observe is not simply an array of discrete ethical injunctions, but the entire revelation from the Father, revelation holistically conceived (cf. 3:31–3212:47–4917:6). More Carson, D. A. The Gospel according to John. Leicester, England; Grand Rapids, MI: Inter-Varsity Press; W.B. Eerdmans, 1991. Print. The Pillar New Testament Commentary.

The Book of Proverbs

The Book of ProverbsProverbs 3:1–12 Excerpt The twentieth book of the Old Testament according to the Christian canon and third of the poetical books (Job, Psalms, Proverbs) in the Hebrew canon included among the Writings. The book of Proverbs is a collection of largely proverbial Wisdom Literature traditionally associated with Solomon, the Israelite king famed for his divine gift of wisdom (1 Kgs. 3–4); the Hebrew title for the book (Heb. mišlêProv. 1:1) reflects this association. It is clear from literary analyses and internal evidence that the contents of the book must be attributed to a variety of authors over an extended period of time. At least three authors are named in headings (Solomon, 1:110:125:1; Agur, 30:1; Lemuel, 31:1), and other segments are attributed anonymously to “the wise” (22:1724:23). The designation of the whole collection as “proverbs” (LXX Gk. Paroimiai; Vulg. Lat. Liber Proverbiorum) is not entirely apt since large portions of the contents (primarily th…

John the Baptist’s Birth Announced

John the Baptist’s Birth AnnouncedExcerpt In this section Luke recorded how God after four hundred years once again visited Israel and raised up a prophet who would prepare the people for the coming of the Messiah. Although the Qumran community believed that God was active and revealed himself through their movement and that their Teacher of Righteousness was a prophet, for the majority of Israel the prophets had fallen asleep (2 Bar 85:1–31 Macc 4:469:2714:41) and the Holy Spirit had ceased in Israel (Tosefta Soṭa 13:3). As a result most people tended to look back to the period of the law and the prophets when God was active among his people or forward to the time of the messianic age when God would once again be active and fulfill his covenantal promises. Thus God’s visit to Zechariah marks for Luke the breaking in of the messianic age, i.e., the beginning of the things that God has fulfilled among his people. More Stein, Robert H. Luke. Vol. 24. Nashville: Broadman & Holman…

Catholic Daily Readings

Tuesday, May 2, 2017 | Memorial Saint Athanasius, Bishop and Doctor of the Church Years 1 & 2 | Roman Missal | Lectionary


From Tuesday of the 3rd Week of Easter First Reading Acts 7:51–8:1a Response Psalm 31:6a Psalm Psalm 31:3c–4, 6, 7b, 8a, 17, 21ab Gospel Acclamation John 6:35ab GospelJohn 6:30–35

Catholic Daily Readings. Bellingham, WA: Faithlife, 2009. Print.

Connect the Testaments

May 2: Don’t Focus on Overcoming Judges 2:11–3:31; Philippians 1:12–18; Psalm 63–64 When I go through difficult circumstances, I want the end. I’m so focused on escape and overcoming that I barely think about what God might be teaching me through that experience. And I’m certainly not thinking about how He might be using me to witness to others. Paul was on a completely different wavelength. In his letter to the church at Philippi, he sets his Roman imprisonment in context: “Now I want you to know, brothers, that my circumstances have happened instead for the progress of the gospel, so that my imprisonment in Christ has become known in the whole praetorium and to all the rest” (Phil 1:12–13). Paul wasn’t just enduring or anticipating the end of his imprisonment. He was using his experience to be a witness for Christ. His captors must have wondered: what makes a person willing to suffer like this? What makes his message worth imprisonment? Paul’s circumstances didn’t merely create waves wit…

Morning and Evening

Morning, May 2Go To Evening Reading
“I pray not that thou shouldst take them out of the world.” —John 17:15
It is a sweet and blessed event which will occur to all believers in God’s own time—the going home to be with Jesus. In a few more years the Lord’s soldiers, who are now fighting “the good fight of faith” will have done with conflict, and have entered into the joy of their Lord. But although Christ prays that his people may eventually be with him where he is, he does not ask that they may be taken at once away from this world to heaven. He wishes them to stay here. Yet how frequently does the wearied pilgrim put up the prayer, “O that I had wings like a dove! for then would I fly away and be at rest;” but Christ does not pray like that, he leaves us in his Father’s hands, until, like shocks of corn fully ripe, we shall each be gathered into our Master’s garner. Jesus does not plead for our instant removal by death, for to abide in the flesh is needful for others if not profitable f…

My Utmost for His Highest

May 2nd The passion of patience Though it tarry, wait for it.Hab. 2:3. Patience is not indifference; patience conveys the idea of an immensely strong rock withstanding all onslaughts. The vision of God is the source of patience, because it imparts a moral inspiration. Moses endured, not because he had an ideal of right and duty, but because he had a vision of God. He “endured, as seeing Him Who is invisible.” A man with the vision of God is not devoted to a cause or to any particular issue; he is devoted to God Himself. You always know when the vision is of God because of the inspiration that comes with it; things come with largeness and tonic to the life because everything is energized by God. If God gives you a time spiritually, as He gave His Son actually, of temptation in the wilderness, with no word from Himself at all, endure; and the power to endure is there because you see God. “Though it tarry, wait for it.” The proof that we have the vision is that we are reaching out for more t…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

May 2 In him was life; and the life was the light of men … Ye are the light of the world John 1:4; Matt. 5:14 In the light we can walk and work. We walk in the light and become entirely children of the light. We let our light, the light of God, shine, so that men may see our good works, and glorify our Father in Heaven. Gently, silently, lovingly, unceasingly, we give ourselves to transmit the light and the love God so unceasingly shines into us. Our one work is to wait, and admit, and then transmit the light of God in Christ. Andrew Murray

 Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.