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Showing posts from May 3, 2017

Full Assurance of Faith

Full Assurance of FaithExcerpt “Let us draw near” (προσερχώμεθα) is a liturgical phrase, denoting the approach of the people, after ceremonial atonement, to the earthly sanctuary (cf. ver. 1τοὺς προσερχομένους). We may now draw near to the very heavenly mercy-seat, without any sense of a bar to our doing so on the ground of consciousness of sin. In Christ we are to see accomplished all that is needed for atonement. But there are conditions also required in ourselves, expressed first by the “true heart”, and the “fulness of faith”, and then by the clauses that follow. These clauses, like προσερχώμεθα, have a liturgical basis—that of the blood sprinkling (e.g.of the people with the blood of the covenant under Mount Sinai, ch. 9:19, and of the priests on their consecration, Lev. 8:23) and of the ablutions before sacrificial service (Lev. 8:616:424Exod. 30:39). Hence these two participial clauses are not to be separated from each other, and seem best to be both taken in connection …

The Adornment of the Christian Woman

The Adornment of the Christian WomanExcerpt Peter in verses 1 and 2 exhorts these Christian wives to win their husbands to the Lord by pious living. In this verse, he forbids them to depend upon outward adornment in their effort at gaining their husbands, and not only upon outward adornment as such, but upon worldly adornment, the kind which they wore before they were saved, immodest, gaudy, conspicuous. These women were making the mistake of thinking that if they would dress as the world dressed, that that would please their unsaved husbands, and they would thus be influenced the easier to take the Lord Jesus as Saviour. It is true that they would be pleased, pleased because the appearance of their wives appealed to their totally depraved natures, and pleased because the Christian testimony of their wives was nullified by their appearance. They would say, “What you appear to be speaks so loudly I cannot hear what you are saying.” It is not true that that would help win their husbands …

Sealed by the Spirit

Sealed by the SpiritEphesians 1:13–14 Excerpt At the time of salvation, the Holy Spirit “seals” or “identifies” the believer, “guaranteeing” his or her salvation. This seal image suggests several things about the believer’s relationship to God: • The believer is owned by God (see 1 Cor. 6:19–202 Tim. 2:19). • he or she is eternally secure (see 4:30; see exposition on John 10:22–30). • Salvation is a completed transaction (see Jer. 32:9–10John 17:419:30). The Holy Spirit is “promised,” for Christ promised his coming (1:13; see John 14:16–1716:713Acts 1:4–5). More Willmington, H. L. Willmington’s Bible Handbook. Wheaton, IL: Tyndale House Publishers, 1997. Print.

A Merciful and Faithful High Priest

A Merciful and Faithful High PriestExcerpt Whatever their needs or trials, their Captain is adequate to help them since He ministers to Abraham’s descendants,not angels. The expression “Abraham’s descendants” (lit., “Abraham’s seed”) may point to the Jewishness of the writer’s audience, but even Gentile Christians could claim to be the “seed of Abraham” in a spiritual sense (Gal. 3:29). The help which the Captain gives to these His followers is again predicated on the fact that He was made like Hisbrothers in every way (Heb. 2:17), that is, both in terms of becoming incarnate and by virtue of suffering. Here for the first time the writer introduced the thought of His priesthood, which he elaborated on later. For now he was content to affirm that this identification with “His brothers” had made possible a priesthood characterized both by mercy and fidelity in service to God. This involved, as its basis, atonement for the sins of the people. Of this too the author said more later, but he…

Connect the Testaments

May 3: If Life Were a Musical Judges 4:1–6:10; Philippians 1:19–30; Psalm 65:1–13 Maybe life should be more like a musical or an oratorio—like Les Misérables or Handel’s Messiah. How we feel is often expressed better in song or poetry than anything else. Literary criticism tells us that poets write verse because prose simply can’t capture the emotions they’re feeling. So much of the Bible is poetry, suggesting that maybe, in a way, poems and songs are the language of God. Deborah and Barak understood this. After Yahweh claimed victory over Israel’s foes through them, they “sang on that day” (Judges 5:1). The Bible records their song. It was epic—the earth trembling (Judges 5:4, 5), the people rejoicing (Judges 5:7), and everyone singing as they recounted “the righteous deeds of Yahweh” and made their way to the city gates (Judges 5:11). This is music, after all; it’s expressive. Paul breaks out in a type of song in Philippians as well (Phil 2:5–11). His song is a result of his raw excitem…

Morning and Evening

Morning, May 3Go To Evening Reading
“In the world ye shall have tribulation.” —John 16:33
Art thou asking the reason of this, believer? Look upward to thy heavenly Father, and behold him pure and holy. Dost thou know that thou art one day to be like him? Wilt thou easily be conformed to his image? Wilt thou not require much refining in the furnace of affliction to purify thee? Will it be an easy thing to get rid of thy corruptions, and make thee perfect even as thy Father which is in heaven is perfect? Next, Christian, turn thine eye downward. Dost thou know what foes thou hast beneath thy feet? Thou wast once a servant of Satan, and no king will willingly lose his subjects. Dost thou think that Satan will let thee alone? No, he will be always at thee, for he “goeth about like a roaring lion, seeking whom he may devour.” Expect trouble, therefore, Christian, when thou lookest beneath thee. Then look around thee. Where art thou? Thou art in an enemy’s country, a stranger and a sojourner. …

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

May 3 Be ye steadfast, unmovable, always abounding in the work of the Lord 1 Cor. 15:58 Activity in doing good is one recipe for being cheerful Christians; it is like exercise to the body, and it keeps the soul in health. Bishop Ryle

 Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.