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But Because You are Lukewarm...

But Because You are Lukewarm...Excerpt The Laodiceans were in spiritual things cold comparatively, but not cold as the world outside, and as those who had never belonged to the Church. The lukewarm state, if it be the transitional stage to a warmer, is a desirable state (for a little religion, if real, is better than none); but most fatal when, as here, an abiding condition, for it is mistaken for a safe state (Rev 3:17). This accounts for Christ’s desiring that they were cold rather than lukewarm. For then there would not be the same “danger of mixed motive and disregarded principle” [Alford]. Also, there is more hope of the “cold,” that is, those who are of the world, and not yet warmed by the Gospel call; for, when called, they may become hot and fervent Christians: such did the once-cold publicans, Zaccheus and Matthew, become. But the lukewarm has been brought within reach of the holy fire, without being heated by it into fervor: having religion enough to lull the conscience in fa…

I and the Father are One

Iand the Fatherare OneJohn 10:30 Excerpt The statement in 10:30 that “I and the Father are one” has been an important battleground of theology.282 The first matter to note is that the word “one” here is neuter (hen) and not masculine (heis), so the text is not arguing for a oneness of personalities or personae (to use the Latin concept) but rather something akin to a oneness of purpose and will. The point being made then is that protecting the sheep (Christians) here is a joint task of the Father and the Son. Having made this point, however, it must be stated immediately that there is no intention here of speaking about two separate gods or of asserting the Arian denial of Jesus as God. Such ideas find no support in Johannine Christology. The clear thesis throughout the Gospel from the Prologue (in which the Word is declared to be God, 1:1) to Thomas’s climactic confession (“My Lord and my God!”20:28) is that Jesus is God.283 No other affirmation would be adequate for John. Moreover, Jo…

Paul Quotes Isaiah

Paul Quotes IsaiahEphesians 2:17 Excerpt Paul used Isaiah 57:19 (quoted in 2:17) and Psalm 118:22 or Isaiah 28:16 (alluded to in 2:20) to show how Christ, as the cornerstone, brought those who were near and far together into one holy temple in the Spirit. The words “But now” (2:13) introduce a contrast with the Gentile’s previous position (2:11–12). Christ brought peace (2:14) by joining the two groups into one. The “wall” (2:14) is an allusion to the wall on the temple grounds that separated the court of the Gentiles from the court that only Jews could enter. The death penalty would be inflicted if a Gentile passed that barrier. That wall of hostility had been broken down in Christ. More Hughes, Robert B., and J. Carl Laney. Tyndale Concise Bible Commentary. Wheaton, IL: Tyndale House Publishers, 2001. Print. The Tyndale Reference Library.

The Sanhedrin

The SanhedrinActs 4:5–6 Excerpt The next day the supreme council or Sanhedrin meets, what Luke calls the rulers, elders, and scribes (4:5). Some antecedent to this body was likely organized by Ezra after the exile (cf. Ezra 5:5Neh. 2:16; etc.). By Peter’s time it is modeled after the group of seventy elders who assisted Moses (Num. 11:16–24Mishnah Sanhedrin 1.16). This court has come to exercise wide-ranging powers, functioning as the final authority in religious matters and handling many domestic political cases as well. The high priest presides over the assembly, with former high priests, members of privileged families, and noted jurists on the court with him. In earlier days the Sanhedrin was made up chiefly of Sadducees, but around 67 b.c. Pharisees gained in power. Now both parties are found in some strength in the Sanhedrin (cf. Acts 5:34–4023:6–10). The present meeting seems to be a specially called one. The councillors sit in a semicircle, with the presiding officer (high…

Catholic Daily Readings

Monday, May 8, 2017 | Easter Monday of the Fourth Week of Easter Years 1 & 2 | Roman Missal | Lectionary


First Reading Acts 11:1–18 Response Psalm 42:3a Psalm Psalm 42:2–3, 43:3–4 Gospel Acclamation John 10:14 GospelJohn 10:1–10 or John 10:11–18 (Year A)

Catholic Daily Readings. Bellingham, WA: Faithlife, 2009. Print.

Connect the Testaments

May 8: Beyond Regret Judges 13:1–14:20; Philippians 3:12–4:1; Psalm 69:1–17 I’ve excelled at regret. When I’ve dwelt on the wrongs I committed against other people and my offensive rebellion against God, I lost my focus. It’s difficult to be confident in our righteousness through Christ when we go through these periods. In Philippians 3:12–14, Paul offers both hope and advice for these times based on his own experience: “But I do one thing, forgetting the things behind and straining toward the things ahead, I press on toward the goal for the prize of the upward call of God in Christ Jesus.” Paul looks forward to being with God in fullness and experiencing the fruits of his labor for the gospel, so he presses “toward the goal.” He emphasizes that we need to forget the “things behind.” Paul would have known the need for this. As a zealous Pharisee, he had persecuted the early church, counting himself the foremost of sinners (1 Tim 1:15). Does forgetting imply that we act as if our failures n…

Morning and Evening

Morning, May 8Go To Evening Reading
“He that was healed wist not who it was.” —John 5:13
Years are short to the happy and healthy; but thirty-eight years of disease must have dragged a very weary length along the life of the poor impotent man. When Jesus, therefore, healed him by a word, while he lay at the pool of Bethesda, he was delightfully sensible of a change. Even so the sinner who has for weeks and months been paralysed with despair, and has wearily sighed for salvation, is very conscious of the change when the Lord Jesus speaks the word of power, and gives joy and peace in believing. The evil removed is too great to be removed without our discerning it; the life imparted is too remarkable to be possessed and remain inoperative; and the change wrought is too marvellous not to be perceived. Yet the poor man was ignorant of the author of his cure; he knew not the sacredness of his person, the offices which he sustained, or the errand which brought him among men. Much ignorance of J…

My Utmost for His Highest

May 8th The patience of faith Because thou hast kept the word of My patience.Rev. 3:10. Patience is more than endurance. A saint’s life is in the hands of God like a bow and arrow in the hands of an archer. God is aiming at something the saint cannot see, and He stretches and strains, and every now and again the saint says—‘I cannot stand any more.’ God does not heed, He goes on stretching till His purpose is in sight, then He lets fly. Trust yourself in God’s hands. For what have you need of patience just now? Maintain your relationship to Jesus Christ by the patience of faith. “Though He slay me, yet will I wait for Him.” Faith is not a pathetic sentiment, but robust vigorous confidence built on the fact that God is holy love. You cannot see Him just now, you cannot understand what He is doing, but you know Him. Shipwreck occurs where there is not that mental poise which comes from being established on the eternal truth that God is holy love. Faith is the heroic effort of your life, you…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

May 8 The righteous eateth to the satisfying of his soul Prov. 13:25 Christ must satisfy; then, if we are not satisfied, it must be because we are not feeding on Him wholly and only. The fault is not in the provision which is made. Frances Ridley Havergal

 Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.