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προσκυνέω in John 4:20-24

προσκυνέω in John 4:20-24John 4:20–24 Excerpt John 4:20–24 deals with the question of the legitimate place to worship God. Jesus declares the alternative “Jerusalem or Gerizim” posed by the Samaritan woman at Jacob’s well (v. 20a, b) to be outdated (vv. 2123a, b). Though the Jews’ worship is, indeed, put before that of the Samaritans (v. 22a, b), this difference is overcome because “now”“the true worshipers worship the Father in spirit and truth” (v. 23a). This does not constitute a rejection of worship at specific places; it is not a matter of the “inwardness” of worship. “Spirit” is the opposite of “flesh,” of powerless and selfish human existence. Worship “in spirit” is worship within the liberated human situation newly disclosed by God. It happens in the “truth” that has come through Christ (1:17). Indeed, Christ is the “truth” (14:6). God’s Spirit leads into “truth” (16:13). Worship “in spirit and truth” (so also 4:24a, b) is worship made possible by Jesus Christ and realized in …

The Woman Caught in Adultery

The Woman Caught in AdulteryExcerpt This story, beloved for its revelation of God’s mercy toward sinners, is found only in John. It was almost certainly not part of John’s original Gospel. The NIV separates this passage off from the rest of the Gospel with the note, “The earliest and most reliable manuscripts and other ancient witnesses do not have John 7:538:11.” That is, the earliest Greek manuscripts, the earliest translations and the earliest church fathers all lack reference to this story. Furthermore, some manuscripts place it at other points within John (after 7:367:44 or 21:25), others include it in the Gospel of Luke (placing it after Luke 21:38), and many manuscripts have marks that indicate the scribes “were aware that it lacked satisfactory credentials” (Metzger 1994:189). Furthermore, it contains many expressions that are more like those in the Synoptic Gospels than those in John. More Whitacre, Rodney A. John. Vol. 4. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1999. Print. …

Seventy Times Seven

Seventy Times SevenExcerpt It was a settled rule of Rabbinism that forgiveness should not be extended more than three times. Even so, the practice was terribly different. The Talmud relates, without blame, the conduct of a rabbi who would not forgive a very small slight of his dignity, though asked by the offender for thirteen successive years, and that on the day of atonement; the reason being that the offended rabbi had learned by a dream that his offending brother would attain the highest dignity; whereupon he feigned himself irreconcilable, to force the other to migrate from Palestine to Babylon, where, unenvied by him, he might occupy the chief place (Edersheim). It must, therefore, have seemed to Peter a stretch of charity to extend forgiveness from three to seven times. Christ is not specifying a number of times greater than the limit of seven. He means that there is to be no limit. “Forgiveness is qualitative, not quantitative.” More Vincent, Marvin Richardson. Word Studies in t…

Torah in Proverbs

Torah in ProverbsProverbs 3:1 Excerpt Proverbs knows of torah as advice of a parent (1:83:1) or a sage (13:14). Torah is paralleled to reproof (1:8), command (3:1), and a good lesson (4:2). Although many of the occurrences of torah here are in the sense of general wisdom, the specific use of torah as religious instruction appears also (28:929:18). More Achtemeier, Paul J., Harper & Row and Society of Biblical Literature. Harper’s Bible dictionary 1985 : 1084. Print.

Catholic Daily Readings

Tuesday, May 9, 2017 | Easter Tuesday of the Fourth Week of Easter Years 1 & 2 | Roman Missal | Lectionary


First Reading Acts 11:19–26 Response Psalm 117:1a Psalm Psalm 87:1b–7 Gospel Acclamation John 10:27 Gospel John 10:22–30

Catholic Daily Readings. Bellingham, WA: Faithlife, 2009. Print.

Connect the Testaments

May 9: Success Deceives Judges 15:1–17:13; Philippians 4:2–9; Psalm 69:18–70:5 When leaders come to power, there are always people who become insistent on stopping them. It’s incredible how easy it is for people to justify envy or hatred for authority figures. Most of us have made the offhand remark, “I hate that guy.” And in those words, even when they’re meant in jest, we reveal the motives of the human heart. But this doesn’t represent who we’re meant to be—people who live for others. Samson, an Israelite judge, endured that fate. A young warrior, he had enemies who wanted him dead and would do nearly anything to bring him down—spiritually or physically. The Philistines who opposed him went so far as to burn his wife and her father alive (Judg 15:6). Samson brought these trials on himself by disobeying God and marrying a foreign wife who would ultimately lead him to worship foreign gods. Even so, the acts of violence against him were not just his own doing. The Philistines, like many p…

Morning and Evening

Morning, May 9Go To Evening Reading
“Who hath blessed us with all spiritual blessings.” —Ephesians 1:3
All the goodness of the past, the present, and the future, Christ bestows upon his people. In the mysterious ages of the past the Lord Jesus was his Father’s first elect, and in his election he gave us an interest, for we were chosen in him from before the foundation of the world. He had from all eternity the prerogatives of Sonship, as his Father’s only-begotten and well-beloved Son, and he has, in the riches of his grace, by adoption and regeneration, elevated us to sonship also, so that to us he has given “power to become the sons of God.” The eternal covenant, based upon suretiship and confirmed by oath, is ours, for our strong consolation and security. In the everlasting settlements of predestinating wisdom and omnipotent decree, the eye of the Lord Jesus was ever fixed on us; and we may rest assured that in the whole roll of destiny there is not a line which militates against the …

My Utmost for His Highest

May 9th Grasp without reach Where there is no vision, the people cast off restraint.Proverbs 29:18 (R.V.). There is a difference between an ideal and a vision. An ideal has no moral inspiration; a vision has. The people who give themselves over to ideals rarely do anything. A man’s conception of Deity may be used to justify his deliberate neglect of his duty. Jonah argued that because God was a God of justice and of mercy, therefore everything would be all right. I may have a right conception of God, and that may be the very reason why I do not do my duty. But wherever there is vision, there is also a life of rectitude because the vision imparts moral incentive. Ideals may lull to ruin. Take stock of yourself spiritually and see whether you have ideals only or if you have vision. “Where there is no vision …” When once we lose sight of God, we begin to be reckless, we cast off certain restraints, we cast off praying, we cast off the vision of God in little things, and begin to act on our ow…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

May 9 Whom the Lord loveth he chasteneth Heb. 12:6 It has been well said that “earthly cares are a heavenly discipline,” but they are even something better than discipline; they are God’s chariots, sent to take the soul to its high places of triumph. In the Canticles we are told of “a chariot paved with love.” We cannot always see the love lining to our own particular chariot—it often looks very unlovely; but every chariot sent by God must necessarily be paved with love, since God is love. It is His love, indeed, that sends the chariot. Look upon your chastenings, then, no matter how grievous they may be for the present, as God’s chariots, sent to carry your souls into the “high places” of spiritual achievement and uplifting, and you will find that they are, after all, “paved with love.” Smith

 Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.