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Showing posts from May 10, 2017

Paul’s Salutation

Paul’s SalutationExcerpt Paul1 began his letter by identifying himself in three different ways.2 First, he was a “servant of Christ Jesus.” He belonged without reserve to the one who confronted him on the Damascus road. Although cultured Greeks would never refer to themselves in such a demeaning fashion, the Old Testament designation “servant of the Lordwas a title of honor given to Moses and other prominent leaders (Josh 14:7;24:29). Then Paul said that he was “called to be an apostle.” God initiated the process. Paul did not choose the role for himself. And even before he was called, he had been “set apart”3 to serve the interests of the gospel of God.4 All three statements reflect the minor role the apostle played. Not for a moment did he elevate himself above his assigned position as a servant of God, set apart and called to serve the interests of the proclamation of the gospel. More Mounce, Robert H. Romans. Vol. 27. Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1995. Print. The N…

Kindness

KindnessEphesians 2:7 Excerpt The particular channel in which the riches of his grace flows is kindness shown to us in Christ Jesus. Kindness in the matter of the blessing, forgiving us freely, and accepting and adopting us in him; kindness in the manner of the blessing, dealing with us as Jesus dealt with the woman that was a sinner, or with the thief on the cross, or with Peter after he had fallen, or with Saul of Tarsus; kindness in the extent of the blessing, providing amply for every want; kindness in the duration of the blessing—for evermore. More Spence-Jones, H. D. M., ed. Ephesians. London; New York: Funk & Wagnalls Company, 1909. Print. The Pulpit Commentary.

Until the Day of Christ Jesus

Until the Day of Christ JesusPhilippians 1:6 Excerpt Paul expressed the confidence that the growth would take place “until the day of Christ Jesus.” He glanced backward to their salvation and forward to the completion of their character when the Lord returns. No doubt the reference to the “day of Christ Jesus” is the “day of the Lord” so common in the Old Testament (Joel 2:1Amos 5:20). The question is why the end times were included at this point. Although Paul could have thought in terms of the imminent coming of the Lord, he also was more aware of a delay than earlier in his ministry.16 Paul’s use of the phrase “until the day” actually called to mind the consummation of the present age. It was Paul’s way of making two emphases: sanctification was an ongoing process and the process would continue to the end of the age. At that time the believers would be complete in character. They needed not to fear the judgment which characterized that day.17 More Melick, Richard R. Philippians, Col…

Noah Enters the Ark

Noah Enters the ArkExcerpt Noah is given a week’s warning before the flood begins. The Hebrew word for “rain” in verse 4 is different than the word for “rain” in verse 12. That used in verse 12 designates a heavy downpour. The rain of verse 4 is no shower—it is to last forty days and forty nights. Noah does what God says (vv. 7–9) and God fulfills his word (v. 10). As the flood starts (7:11–16), again we find the deliberate use of repetition and summarization. This is a characteristic of epic composition. Note: the flood (v. 6); entry into the ark (vv. 7–9); the flood (vv. 10–12); entry into the ark (vv. 13–16). Actually, there are two references to the flood’s beginning: verse 10 and verse 11. The additional data given in verse 11 are about the two sources of the rain: the springs of the great deep and the floodgates of heaven. But the following verse refers only to the second of these. More Hamilton, Victor P. “Genesis.” Evangelical Commentary on the Bible. Vol. 3. Grand Rapids, MI: Ba…

Connect the Testaments

May 10: Old, Wise, and Desperately in Need of God Judges 18:1–19:30; Philippians 4:10–20; Psalm 71:1–24 Sometimes we expect that we’ll naturally grow in faith as we grow older. We tend to see elderly people as those who have been molded and shaped by life—rock-solid in their faith and untapped sources of wisdom. That, or we speed around them in the grocery aisle, blissfully disengaged with the reality that our bodies, too, will slow down and endure pain. While the psalmist seems to express a shadow of both these perspectives in Psa 71, neither of them is complete. Adopting the point of view of an elderly person, he reflects on his life. His prayer to God shows us that maturing in faith isn’t automatic. The elderly man is respected by others, but he doesn’t trust in the honor that some ascribe to him. He knows that Yahweh is the source of his strength, and he praises Him continually: “I have become a wonder to many, but you are my strong refuge. My mouth is filled with your praise, with yo…

Morning and Evening

Morning, May 10Go To Evening Reading
“But now is Christ risen from the dead.” —1 Corinthians 15:20
The whole system of Christianity rests upon the fact that “Christ is risen from the dead;” for, “If Christ has not risen, then is our preaching vain, and your faith is also vain: ye are yet in your sins.” The divinity of Christ finds its surest proof in his resurrection since he was “Declared to be the Son of God with power, according to the spirit of holiness, by the resurrection from the dead.” It would not be unreasonable to doubt his Deity if he had not risen. Moreover, Christ’s sovereignty depends upon his resurrection, “For to this end Christ both died, and rose, and revived, that he might be Lord both of the dead and living.” Again, our justification, that choice blessing of the covenant, is linked with Christ’s triumphant victory over death and the grave; for “He was delivered for our offenses, and was raised again for our justification.” Nay, more, our very regeneration is connecte…

My Utmost for His Highest

May 10th Take the initiative Add to your faith virtue … (“Furnish your faith with resolution.”) (MOFFATT) 2 Peter 1:5. “Add” means there is something we have to do. We are in danger of forgetting that we cannot do what God does and that God will not do what we can do. We cannot save ourselves nor sanctify ourselves, God does that; but God will not give us good habits, He will not give us character, He will not make us walk aright. We have to do all that ourselves, we have to work out the salvation God has worked in. “Add” means to get into the habit of doing things, and in the initial stages, it is difficult. To take the initiative is to make a beginning, to instruct yourself in the way you have to go. Beware of the tendency of asking the way when you know it perfectly well. Take the initiative, stop hesitating, and take the first step. Be resolute when God speaks, act in faith immediately on what He says, and never revise your decisions. If you hesitate when God tells you to do a thing, …

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

May 10 The blood of Jesus Christ, his Son, cleanseth us from all sin 1 John 1:7 Learn a lesson from the eye of the miner, who all day long is working amid the flying coal dust. When he emerges in the light of day his face may be grimy enough; but his eyes are clear and lustrous because the fountain of tears in the lachrymal gland is ever pouring its gentle tides over the eye, cleansing away each speck of dust as soon as it alights. Is not this the miracle of cleansing which our spirits need in such a world as this? And this is what our blessed Lord is prepared to do for us by His cleansing blood if only we will trust Him. F. B. Meyer

 Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.