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Showing posts from May 11, 2017

The Common Gospel

The Common GospelExcerpt Most of the sections of the epistle have begun with a clear reference to the reasons that had led Paul to write them—news, for example, received from Chloe’s household (1:11), or questions asked in a Corinthian letter (7:1, etc.). No such reference is made in the present paragraph, and it is not till 15:12 that we learn that there were some in Corinth (of whom Paul had heard, possibly through Stephanas, Fortunatus, and Achaicus—16:17) who held the view that there was no resurrection of the dead. Throughout chapter 15 Paul deals with this wrong opinion, its presuppositions, and its consequences. In doing so, he finds it necessary to begin some way back; hence the present paragraph, which is intended to call to mind that the resurrection of Christ played an essential part in Paul’s preaching, and indeed in all Christian preaching. Paul plunges directly into the theme. More Barrett, C. K. The First Epistle to the Corinthians. London: Continuum, 1968. Print. Black’s…

Introduction

IntroductionExcerpt ‎There has hardly been a more important time in the history of the United States for Christians to be aware of the nature and function of law and government. Law is the skeletal structure of society, and Christians must work within that structure every day. Jesus said that we are not to be of the world, that is, we are not to adopt its values and ideology. He continues, however, by saying that we are in the world, surrounded by it and interacting with it. The problem is that many Christians in that contact are not having an impact on the world; rather, they are merely bombarded by its values and often succumb to its pressures. To interact with and have an impact on the society in which we live, it is important that we develop a biblical view of the purpose of law and government. … More House, H. Wayne. Christian Ministries and the Law. Ed. Revised edition. Grand Rapids, MI: Kregel, 1999. Print.

Two Views of Adam’s Sin

Two Views of Adam’s SinRomans 5:12 Excerpt The Greek past (aorist) tense occurs in all three verbs in this verse. So the entire human race is viewed as having sinned in the one act of Adam’s sin (cf. “all have sinned,” also the Gr. past tense, in 3:23). Two ways of explaining this participation of the human race in the sin of Adam have been presented by theologians—the “federal headship” of Adam over the race and the “natural or seminal headship” of Adam. (Others say that people merely imitated Adam, that he gave the human race a bad example. But that does not do justice to 5:12.) The federal headship view considers Adam, the first man, as the representative of the human race that generated from him. As the representative of all humans, Adam’s act of sin was considered by God to be the act of all people and his penalty of death was judicially made the penalty of everybody. The natural headship view, on the other hand, recognizes that the entire human race was seminally and physically in A…

Psalm 119

Psalm 119Excerpt This psalm is special in several ways. It is the longest psalm (176 verses), and it is an acrostic psalm, following the letters of the Hebrew alphabet. In most editions of the Bible, the twenty-two sections of this psalm are headed by the successive letters of the Hebrew alphabet (Aleph, Beth, Gimel, etc.). In theHebrew Bible, each verse in a section begins with that Hebrew letter. For example, all the verses in the “aleph” section (vv. 1–8) begin with the Hebrew letter “aleph.” Look at the “teth” section (vv. 65–72) and start v. 67with “Til” and v. 71 with “Tis,” and you will have each line starting with the English letter “T” (which is the same as the Hebrew “teth”). The Jews wrote in this fashion to help them memorize the Scriptures so they could meditate on God’s Word. We do not know who wrote this psalm, although the writer refers to himself many times. He was suffering from his love for God’s Law (vv. 2250–539598115), yet he had determined to obey the Wor…

Connect the Testaments

May 11: Being Good at What Matters Judges 20:1–21:25; Philippians 4:21–23; Psalm 72:1–20 Though prayer is important, it’s an area of our faith lives that we often neglect. But people of great faith in the Bible relied on prayer—and not just for difficult situations. From general direction to specific details, they turned everything over to prayer. God spoke to them directly, they listened, and then they act. Maybe you don’t believe God speaks directly to you. If that’s the case, consider why you think this way. Why wouldn’t He want to speak to you? He chose you by sending His own son to die for you. Jesus, that son, said that God would come and speak to you (John 17). You’re important to God, and He wants to talk to you—to know you. In Judges, we find a situation where people relied on God not just for direction, but for details. The Israelites rose up against the tribe of Benjamin because they refused to address the wickedness among them (Judg 20:12–14). But before entering battle, they …

Morning and Evening

Morning, May 11Go To Evening Reading
“I am with you alway.” —Matthew 28:20
It is well there is One who is ever the same, and who is ever with us. It is well there is one stable rock amidst the billows of the sea of life. O my soul, set not thine affections upon rusting, moth-eaten, decaying treasures, but set thine heart upon him who abides for ever faithful to thee. Build not thine house upon the moving quicksands of a deceitful world, but found thy hopes upon this rock, which, amid descending rain and roaring floods, shall stand immovably secure. My soul, I charge thee, lay up thy treasure in the only secure cabinet; store thy jewels where thou canst never lose them. Put thine all in Christ; set all thine affections on his person, all thy hope in his merit, all thy trust in his efficacious blood, all thy joy in his presence, and so thou mayest laugh at the loss, and defy destruction. Remember that all the flowers in the world’s garden fade by turns, and the day cometh when nothing will…

My Utmost for His Highest

May 11th You won’t reach it on tiptoe Add to your brotherliness … love.2 Peter 1:7. Love is indefinite to most of us, we do not know what we mean when we talk about love. Love is the sovereign preference of one person for another, and spiritually Jesus demands that that preference is for Himself (cf. Luke 14:26). When the love of God is shed abroad in our hearts by the Holy Ghost, Jesus Christ is easily first; then we must practice the working out of these things mentioned by Peter. The first thing God does is to knock pretense and the pious pose right out of me. The Holy Spirit reveals that God loved me not because I was lovable, but because it was His nature to do so. ‘Now,’ He says to me, ‘show the same love to others’“Love as I have loved you.”‘I will bring any number of people about you whom you cannot respect, and you must exhibit My love to them as I have exhibited it to you.’You won’t reach it on tiptoe. Some of us have tried to, but we were soon tired. “The Lord suffereth long …”

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

May 11 Whatsoever he sayeth unto you, do it John 2:5 If I could give you information of my life, it would be to show how a woman of very ordinary ability has been led by God in strange and unaccustomed paths to do in His service what He has done for her. And if I could tell you all, you would see how God has done all, and I nothing. I have worked hard, very hard, that is all: and I have never refused God anything. Florence Nightingale

 Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.