Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from May 19, 2017

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

May 19 I am not able to bear all this people alone, because it is too hard for me Num. 11:14 It is most needful for all servants of Christ to remember that whenever the Lord places a man in a position of responsibility, He will both fit him for it and maintain him in it. It is, of course, another thing altogether if a man will rush unsent into any field of work, or any post of difficulty or danger. In such a case we may assuredly look for a thorough breakdown, sooner or later. But when God calls a man to a certain position, He will endow him with the needed grace to occupy it. This holds good in every case. We can never fail if we only cling to the living God. We can never run dry if we are drawing from the fountain. Our tiny springs will soon dry up; but our Lord Jesus Christ declares, “He that believeth in me, as the Scripture hath said, out of his belly shall flow rivers of living water.” C. H. M.

 Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: …

The Tree of Life

The Tree of LifeExcerpt Whereas God had possibly created trees with the appearance of age (1:12), the trees in the garden were others that had grown later (2:9). Among those trees in the garden was one that produced life (the tree of life) and another that produced knowledge (the tree of the knowledge of good and evil), or at least eating them did. This “knowledge” was experiential. “Good and evil,” a merism for the things that protect life and that destroy life, would be experienced if the forbidden fruit were eaten (v. 17). The potential for catastrophe was great if they in self-confident pride (hubris) overstepped their bounds and attempted to manipulate life. The tree of life, on the other hand, was apparently a means of preserving and promoting life for Adam and Eve in their blissful state. These trees were in the middle of the garden, apparently close to each other; they provided the basis for the testing to come. More Ross, Allen P.Genesis.”The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Ex…

Do Not be a Drunkard

Do Not be a DrunkardExcerpt Nex,t there is the demand for the elder’s temperance —“not given to drunkenness” (v. 3)—literally, “not lingering beside wine.” Anyone who longs for the halcyon days of the apostolic church longs for an illusion. It was rough and tumble. Drunkenness was an ancient blight. In Corinth, some Christians were even in the habit of getting drunk at the Lord’s Supper (cf. 1Corinthians 11:21)! Paul repeats this warning to deacons in verse 8 (“not indulging in much wine”) and again to elders in Titus 1:7 (“not given to drunkenness”). More Hughes, R. Kent, and Bryan Chapell.1 & 2 Timothy and Titus: To Guard the Deposit. Wheaton, IL: Crossway Books, 2000. Print. Preaching the Word.

A Lesson from Barnabas and Paul

A Lesson from Barnabas and PaulActs 15:1–5 Excerpt The behavior of Paul and Barnabas teaches us that it is right to contend for the truth of the gospel in spite of the debate that may ensue. No local church or denomination should settle for politically expedient peace at the expense of doctrinal purity. At the same time, Antioch’s decision to appeal to Jerusalem shows us that doctrinal purity maintained in an atmosphere of contentiousness—at the expense of peace—is an equally wrong situation. More Larkin, William J., Jr. Acts. Vol. 5. Downers, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1995. Print. The IVP New Testament Commentary Series.

Catholic Daily Readings

Friday, May 19, 2017, | Easter Friday of the Fifth Week of Easter Years 1 & 2 | Roman Missal | Lectionary


First Reading Acts 15:22–31 Response Psalm 57:10a Psalm Psalm 57:8–10, 12 Gospel Acclamation John 15:15b GospelJohn 15:12–17

Catholic Daily Readings. Bellingham, WA: Faithlife, 2009. Print.

Connect the Testaments

May 19: Outline for Honor 1 Chronicles 7:1–40; 1 Timothy 5:1–9; Psalm 78:30–52 In most Western cultures today, we’ve lost our connection with the elderly. With one grandparent living halfway across the country and the others having died before I was born, I wasn’t around older people until I met my wife and her family. Unlike me, my wife had the privilege of knowing her great-grandparents. She has a strong sense of tradition and respect for the elderly, as well as a deep desire to help them in all aspects of life, and she has been able to teach me to do the same. Paul is dealing with a similar experience in his first letter to Timothy. Paul says to Timothy, “Do not rebuke an older man but appeal to him as a father, younger men as brothers, older women as mothers, younger women as sisters, with all purity. Honor widows who are truly widows” (1 Tim 5:1–3). By “honor,” Paul means showing a deep sense of concern and an earnest, regular desire to help them financially and with their daily nee…

Morning and Evening

Morning, May 19Go To Evening Reading
“I have seen servants upon horses, and princes walking as servants upon the earth.” —Ecclesiastes 10:7
Upstarts frequently usurp the highest places, while the truly great pine in obscurity. This is a riddle in providence whose solution will one day gladden the hearts of the upright; but it is so common a fact, that none of us should murmur if it should fall to our own lot. When our Lord was upon earth, although he is the Prince of the kings of the earth, yet he walked the footpath of weariness and service as the Servant of servants: what wonder is it if his followers, who are princes of the blood, should also be looked down upon as inferior and contemptible persons? The world is upside down, and therefore, the first are last and the last first. See how the servile sons of Satan lord it in the earth! What a high horse they ride! How they lift up their horn on high! Haman is in the court, while Mordecai sits in the gate; David wanders on the mountains, …

My Utmost for His Highest

May 19th “Out of the wreck, I rise” Who shall separate us from the love of Christ?Romans 8:35. God does not keep a man immune from trouble; He says—“I will be with him in trouble.” It does not matter what real problems in the most extreme form get hold of a man’s life, not one of them can separate him from his relationship to God. We are “more than conquerors in all these things.” Paul is not talking about fabulous things, but of things that are desperately actual; and he says we are super-victors in the midst of them, not by our ingenuity, or by our courage, or by anything other than the fact that not one of them affects our relationship to God in Jesus Christ. Rightly or wrongly, we are where we are, exactly in the condition we are in. I am sorry for the Christian who has not something in his circumstances he wishes was not there. “Shall tribulation …?” Tribulation is never a noble thing; but let tribulation be what it may—exhausting, galling, fatiguing, it is not able to separate us fr…