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Showing posts from May 23, 2017

What’s a Sign?

What’s a Sign?Exodus 3:12 Excerpt ... [a sign is] a significant event, act, or other manifestation that betokens God’s presence or intention. Signs may be miraculous and spectacular, as in the case of those performed by Moses before the people of Israel to demonstrate that God had sent him to them (Exod. 4:1-91730) or before Pharaoh for the same purpose (Exod.7-11). On the other hand, a natural phenomenon such as a rainbow or a sunset may be called asign (Gen.9:13; Ps.65:8), as may an identifying mark such as circumcision (Gen.17:11) or even a prophet and his children (Isa.8:18). More Achtemeier, Paul J., Harper & Row and Society of Biblical Literature. Harper’s Bible dictionary 1985 : 951. Print.

The Emperor Was Supreme

The Emperor Was SupremeExcerpt The Roman emperor was “supreme” in the Roman provinces to which this Epistle was addressed. The Jewish zealots refused obedience. The distinction between “the king as supreme” and “governors sent by him” implies that “if the king command one thing, and the subordinate magistrate another, we ought rather to obey the superior” [Augustine in Grotius]. Scripture prescribes nothing upon the form of government, but simply subjects Christians to that everywhere subsisting, without entering into the question of the right of the rulers (thus the Roman emperors had by force seized supreme authority, and Rome had, by unjustifiable means, made herself mistress of Asia), because the de facto governors have not been made by chance, but by the providence of God. More Jamieson, Robert, A. R. Fausset, and David Brown. Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible. Vol. 2. Oak Harbor, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc., 1997. Print.

Theophany

TheophanyExodus 3:2 Excerpt theophany ... [is a] manifestation of God. The ot contains a number of narratives of or poetic allusions to God revealing himself to men and women. Theophanies frequently are associated with particular holy places, representing the foundation legend of a sanctuary (Gen.12:6-713:1818:128:1-17; Exod.40:34-38) or the call of a prophet within it (Isa.6:1-8). They tend to follow a literary pattern with Canaanite roots: God appears, frequently as divine warrior or king, surrounded by fire or in splendor (Deut. 33:2; Pss. 18:8104:2; Ezek. 1:27-28; Hab. 3:4), andsometimes riding like Baal upon the wind and clouds (Pss.18:1068:33104:3); nature trembles (Exod.19:18; Judg. 5:4-5; Pss.18:7;

Words of “Sin” in the New Testament

Words of “Sin” in the New TestamentRomans 5:12–21 Excerpt The principal NT term is hamartia (and cognates), which is equivalent to ḥṭ’. In classical Gk. it is used for missing a target or taking a wrong road. It is the general NT term for sin as concrete wrongdoing, the violation of God’s law (Jn. 8:46Jas. 1:151 Jn. 1:8). In Rom. 5–8 Paul personifies the term as a ruling principle in human life (cf.5:126:12147:17208:2).paraptōma occurs in classical contexts for an error in measurement or a blunder. The NT gives it a stronger moral connotation as misdeed or trespass (cf.‘dead through … ’Eph. 2:1Mt. 6:14f.).parabasisis a similarly derived term with similar meaning, ‘transgression’, ‘going beyond the norm’ (Rom. 4:15Heb. 2:2).asebeia is perhaps the profoundest NT term and commonly translates pš‘in the lxx. It implies active ungodliness or impiety (Rom. 1:182 Tim. 2:16). Another term is anomia, lawlessness, a contempt for law (Mt. 7:232 Cor. 6:14).kakiaandponēria are…

Connect the Testaments

May 23: Fear: The Fight against It 1 Chronicles 12:1–13:14; 1 Timothy 6:11–21; Psalm 81:1–82:8 Fear is poisonous. When it drives our decisions, it will slowly destroy us—causing us to make moves that are against God’s will and detrimental to ourselves and others. The antidote to fear is complete reliance on Yahweh, our God, and His work through the Spirit. David is the epitome of someone who sets aside fear in favor of God’s work. He surrounds himself with “feared” men, his “mighty men.” The descriptions of their skills show the caliber of these warriors and thus the incredible character and skill it must have taken to lead them (1 Chr 12:1–15). It takes courage to be a leader and valor to be a leader of leaders. David was a man of valor—a man empowered by the Spirit’s work. It would have been easy for David to worry or be concerned as a leader—especially when the Spirit comes upon a smaller group of men who oppose him. People rise up around him, and they are being chosen by God in a way …

Morning and Evening

Morning, May 23Go To Evening Reading
“The Lord will perfect that which concerneth me.” —Psalm 138:8
Most manifestly the confidence which the Psalmist here expressed was a divine confidence. He did not say, “I have grace enough to perfect that which concerneth me—my faith is so steady that it will not stagger—my love is so warm that it will never grow cold—my resolution is so firm that nothing can move it"; no, his dependence was on the Lord alone. If we indulge in any confidence which is not grounded on the Rock of ages, our confidence is worse than a dream, it will fall upon us, and cover us with its ruins, to our sorrow and confusion. All that Nature spins time will unravel, to the eternal confusion of all who are clothed therein. The Psalmist was wise, he rested upon nothing short of the Lord’s work. It is the Lord who has begun the good work within us; it is he who has carried it on; and if he does not finish it, it never will be complete. If there be one stitch in the celestial…

My Utmost for His Highest

May 23rd Careful infidelity Take no thought for your life, what ye shall eat, or what ye shall drink; nor yet for your body what ye shall put on.Matthew 6:25. Jesus sums up commonsense carefulness in a disciple as infidelity. If we have received the Spirit of God, He will press through and say—‘Now where does God come in in this relationship, in this mapped-out holiday, in these new books?’ He always presses the point until we learn to make Him our first consideration. Whenever we put other things first, there is confusion. “Take no thought …”—don’t take the pressure of forethought upon yourself. It is not only wrong to worry, it is infidelity, because worrying means that we do not think that God can look after the practical details of our lives, and it is never anything else that worries us. Have you ever noticed what Jesus said would choke the word He puts in? The devil? No, the cares of this world. It is the little worries always. I will not trust where I cannot see, that is where infi…

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

May 23 Hide thyself by the brook 1 Kings 17:3 Not by the river, but by the brook. The river would always contain an abundant supply, but the brook might dry up at any moment. What does this teach us? God does not place His people in luxuriance here. The world’s abundance might withdraw their affections from Him. He gives them not the river, but the brook. The brook may be running today, tomorrow it may be dried up. And wherefore does God act thus? To teach us that we are not to rest in His gifts and blessings, but in Himself. This is what our hearts are always doing—resting in the gift, instead of the Giver. Therefore God cannot trust us by the river, for it unconsciously takes up His place in the heart. It is said of Israel that when they were full they forgot God. F. Whitfield

 Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.