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Showing posts from May 30, 2017

Walking With God

Walking With GodExcerpt John’s readers were confused by two false teachings. The first was the claim that those who choose sin’s lifestyle can maintain fellowship with God. This John labeled as a lie (v. 6). The second claim was by those who said they were without sin (v. 8). They based their claim to fellowship with God on the belief that they matched God in His moral perfection! John called this claim self-deceit: “We deceive ourselves and the truth is not in us” (v. 8). Truth and falsehood are not related so much to the trustworthiness of the teller as they are to correspondence with reality. The problem with the claim of sinlessness is not that the motives of the claimant are unpure. His or her report may be made with honest conviction. But the report of sinlessness is mistaken: it does not correspond to reality. “We deceive ourselves and the truth is not in us.” What is the reality of sin for the Christian? The simple fact is that while in His death Jesus dealt fully with sin, the s…

The Common Gospel

The Common GospelExcerpt Most of the sections of the epistle have begun with a clear reference to the reasons that had led Paul to write them—news, for example, received from Chloe’s household (1:11), or questions asked in a Corinthian letter (7:1, etc.). No such reference is made in the present paragraph, and it is not till 15:12 that we learn that there were some in Corinth (of whom Paul had heard, possibly through Stephanas, Fortunatus, and Achaicus—16:17) who held the view that there was no resurrection of the dead. Throughout chapter 15 Paul deals with this erroneous opinion, its presuppositions and its consequences. In doing so he finds it necessary to begin some way back; hence the present paragraph, which is intended to call to mind that the resurrection of Christ played an essential part in Paul’s preaching, and indeed in all Christian preaching. Paul plunges directly into the theme. More Barrett, C. K. The First Epistle to the Corinthians. London: Continuum, 1968. Print. Black…

Slaves to Righteousness

Slaves to RighteousnessExcerpt People obviously are the slaves of the one to whom they offer themselves to obey (v.17).43 Paul set forth two masters: one is sin, and the other is obedience [to God]. There is no possibility of living without an allegiance to one or the other. “There is no absolute independence for man,” writes J. Denney; “our nature requires us to serve somemaster.”44 Unbelievers may think they are free and would have to give up that freedom should they accept Christ. Such is not the case. They are servants of sin right now. In coming to Christ they simply exchange one master for another. Servitude to sin is replaced with servitude to God. The master we obey is clear evidence of whose slaves we really are. There is no room for compromise.45 As Jesus taught, “No one can serve two masters” (Matt 6:24). We also are reminded of Joshua’s challenge to the Israelites at Shechem, “Choose for yourselves this day whom you will serve” (Josh 24:15). More Mounce, Robert H. Romans. Vo…

Salvation by Faith, Not by the Law

Salvation by Faith, Not by the LawExcerpt The first part of Deuteronomy 30:12 is Who will ascend into heaven? Paul interprets this as to bring Christ down (= “that is, the incarnation”). Paul’s use of that is is similar to Qumran’s pesher interpretation (so Cranfield 1979; Wilckens 1980; Fitzmyer 1993b), in which the Old Testament text is made to fit a contemporary situation. Paul’s is somewhat different in that he does not view this as the actual meaning of the Old Testament text (as Qumran did) but is applying the Deuteronomy quote to Christ and to the issue of justification by faith (so Moo 1996). Ascending into heaven is an impossible quest. Moses meant that one did not have to climb up to heaven or cross the sea to obey the law. Paul is saying that one does not have to go to heaven to bring Christ down to earth so he can provide salvation to humankind. God has already done that for them. The incarnation is God’s grace gift; it can never be the product of human achievement. In the s…

Catholic Daily Readings

Tuesday, May 30, 2017 | Easter Tuesday of the Seventh Week of Easter Years 1 & 2 | Roman Missal | Lectionary


First Reading Acts 20:17–27 Response Psalm 68:33a Psalm Psalm 68:10–11, 20–21 Gospel AcclamationJohn 14:16 Gospel John 17:1–11a

Catholic Daily Readings. Bellingham, WA: Faithlife, 2009. Print.

Connect the Testaments

May 30: In Season and Out of Season 1 Chronicles 26:1–27:34; 2 Timothy 4:1–8; Psalm 89:23–52 I like to operate when I feel like I’m in control. When I haven’t gathered enough information or I feel uncertain of my circumstances, it’s tempting to avoid making a decision or taking action. Paul knew that this type of outlook was detrimental to Timothy’s ministry. He tells Timothy that regardless of his circumstances, he was required to act: “Preach the word, be ready in season and out of season, reprove, rebuke, exhort, with all patience and instruction” (2 Tim 4:2). Paul uses the certainty of Christ’s return to motivate Timothy to stick to his task (2 Tim 4:1). Although Timothy experienced times when it was not always convenient for him to act on his calling, he had been admonished by Paul about the importance of the work they were doing together: their calling. He also knew the urgency of that calling. Christ’s return and the appearance of His kingdom was their motivation (2 Tim 4:1). We can…

Morning and Evening

Morning, May 30Go To Evening Reading
“Take us the foxes, the little foxes that spoil the vines.” —Song of Solomon 2:15
A little thorn may cause much suffering. A little cloud may hide the sun. Little foxes spoil the vines; and little sins do mischief to the tender heart. These little sins burrow in the soul, and make it so full of that which is hateful to Christ, that he will hold no comfortable fellowship and communion with us. A great sin cannot destroy a Christian, but a little sin can make him miserable. Jesus will not walk with his people unless they drive out every known sin. He says, “If ye keep my commandments, ye shall abide in my love, even as I have kept my Father’s commandments and abide in his love.” Some Christians very seldom enjoy their Saviour’s presence. How is this? Surely it must be an affliction for a tender child to be separated from his father. Art thou a child of God, and yet satisfied to go on without seeing thy Father’s face? What! thou the spouse of Christ, and…

My Utmost for His Highest

May 30th “Yes—But …!” Lord, I will follow Thee; but … Luke 9:61. Supposing God tells you to do something which is an enormous test to your common sense, what are you going to do? Hang back? If you get into the habit of doing a thing in the physical domain, you will do it every time until you break the habit determinedly; and the same is true spiritually. Again and again you will get up to what Jesus Christ wants, and every time you will turn back when it comes to the point, until you abandon resolutely. ‘Yes, but—supposing I do obey God in this matter, what about …?’ ‘Yes, I will obey God if He will let me use my common sense, but don’t ask me to take a step in the dark.’ Jesus Christ demands of the man who trusts Him the same reckless sporting spirit that the natural man exhibits. If a man is going to do anything worth while, there are times when he has to risk everything on his leap, and in the spiritual domain Jesus Christ demands that you risk everything you hold by common sense and …

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

May 30 Ye are the light of the world. A city that is set on an hill cannot be hid Matt. 5:14 Lamps do not talk, but they do shine. A lighthouse sounds no drum, it beats no gong; and yet far over the waters its friendly spark is seen by the mariner. So let your actions shine out your religion. Let the main sermon of your life be illustrated by all your conduct. Spurgeon

 Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.