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The Form of Philippians 2:6-11

The Form of Philippians 2:6-11Philippians 2:6–11 Excerpt The basic question regarding form is whether these verses are an early Christian hymn. Most contemporary scholars interpret these verses as a hymn because of the rhythmical quality, rare words and phrases, and motifs. The second portion of the passage, 2:9–11, goes beyond the demands of the immediate context. It seems to be the second stanza of the hymn about Christ. Although the exaltation theme presented there contributes to the context, here Paul advocated humility, not exaltation. If the verses do constitute a hymn, which seems reasonable, they reveal something of the worship of the early church. At least two characteristics predominate: They express a depth of theology which reveals in particular a highly developed Christology; they reveal that the early church had formulated its Christology in cryptic but powerful language. Further, the fact that Paul could appeal to the (apparently) well-known hymn indicates the widespread …

Knowing the Fear of the Lord

Knowing the Fear of the LordExcerpt The fear of the Lord has a familiar, weakened sense, in which it means little more than piety (e.g. Job 28:28Prov. 9:10); the context forbids this weakened sense here. So far as we are to be judged by our deeds we may well be afraid of what is to come. It is in this fear that we persuade (conative, perhaps: we try to persuade) men. Compare Gal. 1:10, Are we now persuading men or God? This verse suggests that Paul may have been accused of persuading men in a bad sense, that is, of winning them over to his side in an unscrupulous way that would bear examination neither before God nor at the bar of the human conscience. More Barrett, C. K. The Second Epistle to the Corinthians. London: Continuum, 1973. Print. Black’s New Testament Commentary.

Uzziah

UzziahExcerpt Judah’s king from around 792 to 740 bc (cf. 2 Kgs 14:21–2215:1–72 Chr 26:1–23), the son of King Amaziah and Jecoliah of Jerusalem. Uzziah is the name he is called in Chronicles, but in Kings he is known as Azariah. Azariah means “the Lord has helped”; the meaning of Uzziah is “my strength is the Lord.” Azariah may have been his given name and Uzziah a throne name taken upon his accession. He came to the throne at the age of 16, after the death of his father, who was assassinated in Lachish as a result of a conspiracy arising from his apostasy. Uzziah was a capable, energetic, and well-organized person, with many diverse interests. The Lord blessed him in all of his undertakings, so that he prospered. He is characterized as one who “did what was right in the eyes of the Lord” (2 Kgs 15:32 Chr 26:4). He determined to seek God and went to Zechariah (not the postexilic prophet) for spiritual instruction. Consequently, “as long as he sought the Lord, God made him prosper”…

Jericho

JerichoExcerpt With a great crowd following Him, Jesus was on His way to Jerusalem for that final Passover. There were two cities named Jericho: the ruined old city and the new city about a mile away, built by Herod. This helps to explain how He could depart from Jericho (Matt. 20:29), draw near to Jericho (Luke18:35), and come and go out of Jericho all at the same time and still meet the two blind beggars (Matt. 20:30). Mark describes the healing of Bartimaeus, the more vocal of the two, just as he did the healing of one of the Gadarene demoniacs (5:2). More Wiersbe, Warren W. Wiersbe’s Expository Outlines on the New Testament. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1992. Print.

Connect the Testaments

June 8: Badly Aligned 2 Chronicles 19:1–20:37; Titus 3:12–15; Psalm 101:1–8 Like a car with bad alignment, we are prone to drift off course when we’re not focused on steering our faith. Often, we use intellectual pursuits to disguise our drifting. It’s easier to argue an opinion than to respond faithfully. It’s stimulating to have a theoretical conversation about a complex issue because there is no hard-and-fast application. When we drift, we might even succeed in convincing ourselves that we’re being faithful. New Christians often have a zealous faith and a desire to learn that make seasoned Christians take a second look at their own faith. In Psalm 101, the psalmist expresses this type of zeal for God. While his specific actions can seem strange to our modern ears, his desire to pursue God with his entire being is one we ourselves should adopt. He follows his repeated “I will” statements with promises to sing of God’s steadfast love and justice, ponder the way that is blameless, and wa…

Morning and Evening

Morning, June 8Go To Evening Reading
“There fell down many slain, because the war was of God.” —1 Chronicles 5:22
Warrior, fighting under the banner of the Lord Jesus, observe this verse with holy joy, for as it was in the days of old so is it now, if the war be of God the victory is sure. The sons of Reuben, and the Gadites, and the half tribe of Manasseh could barely muster five and forty thousand fighting men, and yet in their war with the Hagarites, they slew “men, an hundred thousand,” “for they cried to God in the battle, and he was entreated of them, because they put their trust in him.” The Lord saveth not by many nor by few; it is ours to go forth in Jehovah’s name if we be but a handful of men, for the Lord of Hosts is with us for our Captain. They did not neglect buckler, and sword, and bow, neither did they place their trust in these weapons; we must use all fitting means, but our confidence must rest in the Lord alone, for he is the sword and the shield of his people. The gr…

My Utmost for His Highest

June 8th What next? Determine to know more than others. If ye know these things, happy are ye if ye do them.John 13:17. If you do not cut the moorings, God will have to break them by a storm and send you out. Launch all on God, go out on the great swelling tide of His purpose, and you will get your eyes open. If you believe in Jesus, you are not to spend all your time in the smooth waters just inside the harbour bar, full of delight, but always moored; you have to get out through the harbour bar into the great deeps of God and begin to know for yourself, begin to have spiritual discernment. When you know you should do a thing, and do it, immediately you know more. Revise where you have become ‘stodgy’ spiritually, and you will find it goes back to a point where there was something you knew you should do, but you did not do it because there seemed no immediate call to, and now you have no perception, no discernment; at a time of crisis you are spiritually distracted instead of spiritually …

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

June 8 Thou shall never wash my feet John 13:8 Whatever hinders us from receiving a blessing that God is willing to bestow upon us is not humility, but the mockery of it. A genuine humility will ever feel the need of the largest measures of grace, and will be perfected just in the degree in which that grace is bestowed. The truly humble man will seek to be filled with all the fullness of God, knowing that when so filled there is not the slightest place for pride or for self. George Bowen

 Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.