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Showing posts from June 12, 2017

The Name “John”

The Name “John”Luke 1:13 Excerpt The name means Yahweh has been gracious, but the significance of the name was not explained. The name was not given because of its etymology (contrast Matt 1:21). It was noted because Luke’s readers already knew of John the Baptist and his role in salvation history and because Luke wanted to point out John’s miraculous birth and divine calling to prepare for the coming of the Messiah. John is referred to again in Luke 3:1–205:337:18–359:7–911:116:1620:4–6More Stein, Robert H. Luke. Vol. 24. Nashville: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1992. Print. The New American Commentary.

Pass From Death to Life

Pass From Death to LifeExcerpt This is a spiritual resurrection (see Eph. 2:1–3) and takes place when sinners hear theWord and believe. The man Christ healed was really a living dead man. When he heard the Word and believed, he was given new life in his body. Christ has life in Himself, for Christis “the Life” (14:6) and therefore can give life to others. More Wiersbe, Warren W. Wiersbe’s Expository Outlines on the New Testament. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1992. Print.

The Angel Gabriel

The Angel GabrielLuke 1:19 Excerpt A prominent angel. Gabriel reveals eschatological mysteries in Dan. 8:15–269:21–27 and announces the births of John the Baptist and Jesus in Luke 1:11–2026–38. The etymology of the name is disputed, meaning “God is my Warrior” or perhaps “Man of God.” Gabriel and Michael are the only two angels explicitly named in the OT. In the more developed angelology of Jewish apocalyptic traditions, they appear regularly together with Raphael and others as prominent archangels who stand in the presence of God (1 En. 9:1; 10:1–12; 1QM 9:14–16; Luke 1:19; cf. Rev. 8:26). In Daniel Gabriel serves primarily as interpreter of visions and mysteries; in later apocalyptic sources his functions are more varied. In 1 Enoch he is identified as one of the holy angels whose role is to oversee the garden of Eden, the serpents and the cherubim (1 En. 20:7); in 10:9–10 he is sent in judgment against the children born from the “Watchers” (fallen angels). In the War Scroll at …

Church or Lair?

Church or Lair?Excerpt Dragons, of course, are fictional beasts—monstrous reptiles with lion’s claws, a serpent’s tail, bat wings, and scaly skin. They exist only in the imagination. ‎But there are dragons of a different sort, decidedly real. In most cases, though not always, they do not intend to be sinister; in fact, they’re usually quite friendly. But their charm belies their power to destroy. ‎Within the church, they are often sincere, well-meaning saints, but they leave ulcers, strained relationships, and hard feelings in their wake. They don’t consider themselves difficult people. They don’t sit up nights thinking of ways to be nasty. Often they are pillars of the community—talented, strong personalities, deservingly respected—but for some reason, they undermine the ministry of the church. They are not naturally rebellious or pathological; they are loyal church members, convinced they’re serving God, but they wind up doing more harm than good. … More Shelley, Marshall. Well-Intentio…

Connect the Testaments

June 12: Conflict Creators and Peacemakers 2 Chronicles 29:1–30:27; 1 John 2:7–14; Psalm 104:1–15 Conflict can be good. And in communities, it’s inevitable. The ways in which we respond to it can display and develop character. But what if we are the ones responsible for creating conflict with others? John addresses the root of chronic conflict in a letter to a church community. He tells them, “The one who says he is in the light and hates his brother is in the darkness until now. The one who loves his brother resides in the light, and there is no cause for stumbling in him. But the one who hates his brother is in the darkness, and walks in the darkness, and does not know where he is going, because the darkness has blinded his eyes” (1 John 2:9–11). John was giving the church a way in which they could judge false teachers who created conflict and division. Those who were not walking in the light—who hated their brothers—were known by their contentious nature. Conversely, those who walked i…

Morning and Evening

Morning, June 12Go To Evening Reading
“Thou art weighed in the balances and art found wanting.” —Daniel 5:27
It is well frequently to weigh ourselves in the scale of God’s Word. You will find it a holy exercise to read some psalm of David, and, as you meditate upon each verse, to ask yourself, “Can I say this? Have I felt as David felt? Has my heart ever been broken on account of sin, as his was when he penned his penitential psalms? Has my soul been full of true confidence in the hour of difficulty as his was when he sang of God’s mercies in the cave of Adullam, or in the holds of Engedi? Do I take the cup of salvation and call upon the name of the Lord?” Then turn to the life of Christ, and as you read, ask yourselves how far you are conformed to his likeness. Endeavour to discover whether you have the meekness, the humility, the lovely spirit which he constantly inculcated and displayed. Take, then, the epistles, and see whether you can go with the apostle in what he said of his exper…

My Utmost for His Highest

June 12th Getting there "Where the self-interest sleeps and the real interest awakens: Master, where dwellest Thou?Come and see.… Come with Me."John 1:39. “They abode with Him that day.” That is about all some of us ever do, then we wake up to actualities, self-interest arises and the abiding is passed. There is no condition of life in which we cannot abide in Jesus. “Thou art Simon, thou shalt be called Cephas.” God writes the new name on those places only in our lives where He has erased the pride and self-sufficiency and self-interest. Some of us have the new name in spots only, like spiritual measles. In sections we look all right. When we have our best spiritual mood on, you would think we were very high-toned saints; but don’t look at us when we are not in that mood. The disciple is one who has the new name written all over him; self-interest and pride and self-sufficiency have been completely erased. Pride is the deification of self, and this to-day in some of us is not …

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

May 12 "I know how to abound" Phil. 4:12 It is a dangerous thing to be prosperous. The crucible of adversity is a less severe trial to the Christian than the refining-pot of prosperity. It needs more than human skill to carry the brimming cup of mortal joy with a steady hand; yet Paul had learned that skill, for he declares, “In all things I am instructed both to be full and to be hungry.” When we have much of God’s providential mercies it often happens that we have but little of God’s grace; satisfied with earth, we are content to do without Heaven. Rest assured, it is harder to know how to be full than it is to know how to be hungry, so desperate is the tendency of human nature to pride and forgetfulness of God. Take care that you ask in your prayers that God would teach you “how to be full.” Spurgeon

 Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.