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How Has Archaeology Corroborated the Bible?

How Has Archaeology Corroborated the Bible?Excerpt The real role of archaeology is not to “prove” the Bible, for that kind of “proof” is available only in certain deductive sciences such as mathematics and logic. On the contrary, the role of archaeology is: (1) to supply cultural, epigraphic, and artifactual materials that provide the background for accurately interpreting the Bible, (2) to anchor the events of the biblical text in the history and geography of the times, and (3) to build confidence in the revelation of God where the truths of Scripture impinge on historical events. Over the last century or so, archaeology has strengthened the case for biblical reliability. Missing individuals, peoples, places, and obscure customs, historical, and political settings have been helpfully identified. More Kaiser Jr., Walter C. “How Has Archaeology Corroborated the Bible?”The Apologetics Study Bible: Real Questions, Straight Answers, Stronger Faith. Ed. Ted Cabal et al. Nashville, TN: Holman …

Creation Myths

Creation MythsGenesis 1:1–2 Excerpt Ancient explanations of the universe ranged from the Mesopotamian claim that matter represents the corpse of a slain deity, Tiamat, to the Greek conviction that the physical universe preexisted the gods. Only Genesis exalts God above His Creation. And only Genesis gives human beings a central place in Creation, as persons made in God’s image who are deeply loved by Him. Thus the biblical view of Creation has always been radical—and remains in direct conflict with the modern notion that everything is the product of chance evolution. More Richards, Lawrence O. The Bible Reader’s Companion. electronic ed. Wheaton: Victor Books, 1991. Print.

Origins of the Samaritans

Origins of the SamaritansJohn 4:1–45 Excerpt Josephus traces their origins to the foreigners (he calls them Cutheans) forcibly brought into the territory of Israel after its defeat by the Assyrians in 722 b.c.e. (2 Kgs. 17). The earliest evidence of the schism between Jew and Samaritan comes from the Persian period. This includes the more ambiguous mention of Samaritans in Ezra 4, which could be a geographical designation of peoples rather than a reference to a religious group. More Anderson, Robert T. “Samaritans.” Ed. David Noel Freedman, Allen C. Myers, and Astrid B. Beck. Eerdmans dictionary of the Bible 2000 : 1159. Print.

Who is the Loyal Yokefellow?

Who is the Loyal Yokefellow?Philippians 4:3 Excerpt The exact identity of Paul’s loyal yokefellow is not known. Some say yokefellow(syzygus) is a proper name. Paul knew he could count on him to work with the women and bring them back to fellowship with each other and with the Lord. Clement and other fellow workers had also contended for the gospel with these women. (This is more likely than supposing the words “along with Clement and the rest of my fellow workers” go with “help,” as though Paul were enlisting Clement and others to help Syzygus unite the women.) More Lightner, Robert P. “Philippians.”The Bible Knowledge Commentary: An Exposition of the Scriptures. Ed. J. F. Walvoord and R. B. Zuck. Vol. 2. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books, 1985. 663. Print.

Thoughts for the Quiet Hour

June 21 These … have turned the world upside down Acts 17:6 The serene beauty of a holy life is the most powerful influence in the world next to the might of God. Pascal

 Hardman, Samuel G., and Dwight Lyman Moody. Thoughts for the Quiet Hour. Willow Grove, PA: Woodlawn Electronic Publishing, 1997. Print.

Morning and Evening

Morning, June 21Go To Evening Reading
“Thou art fairer than the children of men.” —Psalm 45:2
The entire person of Jesus is but as one gem, and his life is all along but one impression of the seal. He is altogether complete; not only in his several parts, but as a gracious all-glorious whole. His character is not a mass of fair colours mixed confusedly, nor a heap of precious stones laid carelessly one upon another; he is a picture of beauty and a breastplate of glory. In him, all the “things of good repute” are in their proper places, and assist in adorning each other. Not one feature in his glorious person attracts attention at the expense of others; but he is perfectly and altogether lovely.
Oh, Jesus! thy power, thy grace, thy justice, thy tenderness, thy truth, thy majesty, and thine immutability make up such a man, or rather such a God-man, as neither heaven nor earth hath seen elsewhere. Thy infancy, thy eternity, thy sufferings, thy triumphs, thy death, and thine immortality, are …

My Utmost for His Highest

June 21st The ministry of the interior But ye are … a royal priesthood.1 Peter 2:9. By what right do we become “a royal priesthood”? By the right of the Atonement. Are we prepared to leave ourselves resolutely alone and to launch out into the priestly work of prayer? The continual grubbing on the inside to see whether we are what we ought to be, generates a self-centred, morbid type of Christianity, not the robust, simple life of the child of God. Until we get into a right relationship to God, it is a case of hanging on by the skin of our teeth, and we say—‘What a wonderful victory I have got!’ There is nothing indicative of the miracle of Redemption in that. Launch out in reckless belief that the Redemption is complete, and then bother no more about yourself, but begin to do as Jesus Christ said—pray for the friend who comes to you at midnight, pray for the saints, pray for all men. Pray on the realization that you are only perfect in Christ Jesus, not on this plea—‘O Lord, I have done …

Connect the Testaments

June 21: Position, Prayer, and Strategy Nehemiah 1:1–3:32; 1 John 4:13–15; Psalm 108:1–13 Trying to make a difference in the world can be disheartening; it’s easy to feel like merely a drop in the bucket. When Nehemiah first heard about the suffering of His people, he could have been discouraged. When he learned that the returned exiles were “in great trouble and shame,” living in a city with no walls (Neh 1:3), he could have said, “I’d love to help, but what can I do from this far away?” Instead, he decided to take action (Neh 1:3), and he did so thoughtfully. Rather than making a rash decision, he prayed (Neh 1:4–8). He then volunteered to be the one to help God’s people (Neh 1:9–11), even though doing so meant risking his life. As the cupbearer to the king, Nehemiah recognized his unique place of influence and acted upon it (Neh 2:1–3). He chose to appear saddened before the most powerful man in the world by hanging his head. His actions could have been perceived as a sign of disrespec…